Saddle patch/repair advice

After a first round of internet searching, it seems that there isn’t an obvious one-stop approach to repairing saddles.

Here is my saddle:

What I’m thinking right now is some good ol’ Gorilla Tape.

Thoughts? Thanks in advance,

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Gorilla tape, duck tape, all good things. If you want to get fancy you could remove all the staples and take the cover off, see a patch on, and then make a bunch of holes around the perimeter, reinforce the holes, and tie it all together with a shoe string. When I did that I actually never got around to the patch as I was mainly doing it to add more foam to the seat. This comes with the benefit of being able to just remove the handle and bumper and untie the saddle cover to mess with foam layout. Oh and I also boiled that seat flat.

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Gorilla/ductape worked fine for me. Not exactly permanent, but lasted probably a year or so before I needed to reapply, which I think is good enough.

You could of course carefully take the cover off and properly patch it, but I don’t think I would do that unless you have an additional reason. (Like flattening the base or reshaping foam).
It never ends up just as neat as it was before.

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Thanks to both of you. I’m gonna go the Gorilla Tape route on this one. It’s a stock saddle and this one is meant to take a beating :smiley:

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Some people use hockey tape to protect their saddle. It’s more aesthetically pleasing. I haven’t tried it myself.

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I think hot melt glue also works.

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This is probably no help with repairing your seat, but the first thing I made for my KH29 and all other unicycles as I get them, is to make a Rubber bumper for the seat.

I had an old truck tire that the kids used until it deflated. Now I cut strips off it and cable tie the rubber to the plastic seat bumper. (after drilling 2 holes at 3 locations.)
Before cable ties, I tried just silicone, as can be seen in photo, it doesn’t hold.
I also put tape on the rubber to lessen friction, but it gets messy as tape ages.



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Oh I like that. You could probably sell those.

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Can you 3D print a bumper, or is that material just too fragill for that?

@Pokalde That is a sharp ideal! I like it to! :sunglasses:

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It depends on the plastic and on how often and badly the uni falls.
For example, on my 29er, I have a PLA 3d printed part at the back, to protect the frame. It has got one real fall on the road, and a small part is broken.
So on a street uni or a muni, I would say you can’t do it with PLA or ABS.
On a road uni, it might work, but it requires a quite good level to nearly never fall, because it wouldn’t survive a lot of falls.

But if you can print nylon or TPU, I think that a solid or nearly solid piece could work, even on a street uni.

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Can you 3D Print with TPU at home, or is that strictly for a corporate 3D printer?

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You can, but it is a bit challenging, and some printers are not able to, because since this is a flexible material, it has a tendency to flex in the extruder and to go on the side instead of in the nozzle.

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Ahhh, I found some TPU 3D printers. I see money making ideals with this! :slightly_smiling_face:

https://43dprint.org/tpu-3d-printer/

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My solution is to paste a piece of female velcro on the rear bumper, and make a removable fabric bumper with male velcro.

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Oh, that’s even better! Makes it more cost effective to replace when the bumper gets damaged, and it looks nice. Much better option than hockey tape.:+1:

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