Knobby tire

Hey,

I’ve got a 20" norco unicycle, and sometimes i ride on gravel roads with it, but the thing is the tire isnt very knobby, so for my birthday i got a knobby tire, but i havent put it on yet. So anyways i go to this bike shop to get my KH seat, and i’m talking to the guy there, and i say i’m going to put on a knobby tire, and he says thats not a good idea, its not meant for a knobby tire. Does anyone else think this, maybe he thought i was putting a wider tire on, but the knobby tire i got is the same size and width. Can someone give me their opinion???

One more question on tires, why do i always see people spelling it “tyre,”??

As long as it fits there is nothing wrong with a knobby. It just won’t be as efficient on pavement and not quite as condusive to freestyle but would definitely help for gravel roads. If a knobby fits your needs, go for it.

This is an international newsgroup. Different cultures use different spellings. You will find many different terms too. What is pavement to you may be tarmac to another.

Have fun with with your knobby tyre for off tarmac riding.:slight_smile:

Great question, with no logical answer. My ancestors had to flee the Old Country because they just couldn’t get with the programme. They sought a new land, where words could be spelled correctly and tomatoes could be pronounced with the long A they so richly deserved… :sunglasses:

Re: Knobby tire

On Sat, 21 Jun 2003 09:23:53 -0500, glopal
<glopal.pdnwo@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>One more question on tires, why do i always see people spelling it
>“tyre,”??

Because it is the only correct English spelling, English being the
language used in England.

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

“No two crotches are alike. If they are, I don’t want to know about it. - John Foss, on seat comfort.”

Why do people spell it as tire? :slight_smile:

Colour. Disc. Sulphur.

Adrian,

How do other people spell disc and sulphur?

Just to bring this back onto the subject…it does sound like you should get a knobby tyre. I don’t mind using knobby tyres for the occasional freestyle things and I actually prefer them for wheel walking (although I don’t own a freestyle uni).

Andrew

Disk, and sulfur. Silly americans :wink:
Technically, sulfur is now the ‘standard’ way of spelling it, but I’d imagine most people will continue to spell it the way they’re used to.

Shouldn’t it be a ‘knobbly’ tyre, rather than a ‘knobby’?

How can you change the spelling of an element? That’s a bit strange isn’t it?

Shouldn’t it be a ‘knobbly’ tyre, rather than a ‘knobby’?
…or ‘knobful’.

Re: Knobby tire

In article <andrew_carter.pekjn@timelimit.unicyclist.com>,
andrew_carter <andrew_carter.pekjn@timelimit.unicyclist.com> writes:

> How can you change the spelling of an element? That’s a bit strange
> isn’t it?

The precident in “Aluminium” is pretty well established.

============================================================
Gardner Buchanan <gbuchana@rogers.com>
Ottawa, ON FreeBSD: Where you want to go. Today.

Re: Knobby tire

On Sat, 21 Jun 2003 21:08:25 -0500, andrew_carter
<andrew_carter.pekjn@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>How can you change the spelling of an element? That’s a bit strange
>isn’t it?
Happened to ‘aluminium’ as well. Most Americans call it ‘aluminum’.
Don’t get me started on the recent official (by law) spelling revision
in the Netherlands.

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

“No two crotches are alike. If they are, I don’t want to know about it. - John Foss, on seat comfort.”

Tyre? I mean really

Leave it to the Brits to use the name of a Phoenician city that was founded around 2600 BC!

As far as the American pronunciation of aluminium (aluminum) explain to me why Brits pronounce it school (skool) and schedule (shed-yule) and then I’ll shut up. Besides as unicyclists should we really be commenting about anyone being silly?

Poh-tay-toe, poh-tot-toe, tom-ate-toe, tom-ot-toe