Encouraging parents - not!

Out for a little muni with Chris Dobbie and others
yesterday. On the way back to the car park, I heard
a woman say to her young daughter, “That’s hard. You’d
never be able to do that, would you?”. I couldn’t help
thinking about Hannah Dobbie, about the same age, riding
only 50 yards or so behind me. It amused me anyway.

Another guy did approach me to find out where he could
get a uni for his son, so I guess it all balances out. [I sent him your way, Roger.]

Arnold the Aardvark

Re: Encouraging parents - not!

Arnold the Aardvark wrote:
>
> Out for a little muni with Chris Dobbie and others
> yesterday. On the way back to the car park, I heard
> a woman say to her young daughter, “That’s hard. You’d
> never be able to do that, would you?”.

Sad, sad, sad.

As a parent myself, I find it very disheartening when parents discourage
their children from trying things. The simple fact is, unless a child
has a mental or physical disability they CAN do anything whether it’s
art, science, sports or anything else you can imagine.

…stepping down from my soap box now.

Jason

One young girl who was obviously keen and whose mother inexplicably said no was undefeated… she tells me with a twinkle in her eye, “Don’t worry, I’ll see you here sometime when I’m with my Dad, and he lets me try BMX bikes and everything”. So a determined kid will find a way.

Re: Encouraging parents - not!

Of course we don’t have the benefit of seeing or hearing the mother’s tone of voice and facial expressions, but perhaps she was using reverse psychology and secretly issuing a challange to her daughter.

On the other hand, as former day care center owners, we’ve seen such a variety of parents’ child handling methods and some are extremely discouraging. It’s almost as if the parent is harboring some secret, deep hurt and is taking it out on the child’s confidence. Very sad.

Bruce

…brainwashed child

I agree that most children are completely open to get into new things and tend to have a lot of trust into their own abilities.
While riding on a muddy trail today, I overheard an about 8 year old girl who was walking next to a women (possibly her grandma, she was too old to be her mom): “Unicycling is much too dangerous.” I was too flabbergasted to make any attempt to un-brainwash the kid (and did not want to turn around either for fear of faceplanting into the mud - which might have reinforced the kid’s/grandparent’s prejudice).

Have fun,
Fred

Re: …brainwashed child

I’ve heard a few people say that… I generally tell them there’s less to get tangled up on than a bike, so if you fall off you generally just end up standing up feeling a bit silly.

Liberal use of the word “generally”… tell that to the scar on my leg!

Phil, just me