Your defiinition of Mountain Uni'n?

whats your def. of MUni? like i mean to me when i think of MUni, i think of steeper trails with roots, and stuff, not like climbing hills on my uni. cuz were i am, its impossible to ride up the mountain. well maybe not, no it is, unless you got like legs like Catorina Lee May Doen,(spelt her name wrong wrong, but shes a speed skater, and has huge legs)

first of all you would probably need shimizu legs but you’re not a skater so you wouldn’t know(or are you?). I would classify it as anything on rough terrain , and it doesn’t have to be insanely extreme either. anything that requires my muni to ride instead of just a street uni is good enough for me to be called muniing

That’s how I think of it, as more challenging off-road riding, not just going down a grassy hill. I don’t think of it as steeper, though, but more as being rougher.

My definition had changed a few days ago. Please see http://tinyurl.com/4rz for my current thoughts on the word Muni.
-David Kaplan

RE: Your defiinition of Mountain Uni’n?

> whats your def. of MUni?

noun: A unicycle designed and built to ride off road (on unpaved surfaces)

This is not to say you can’t have fun “MUni’ing” with an off-the-shelf
regular unicycle, you can. But the cycle is not, by definition, a MUni.

verb: Mountain unicycling.

George Peck always called it “rough terrain unicycling.” His moniker was the
more accurate one, but I always preferred mountain unicycling because it
related to mountain bicycling. When mountain bikes first became popular,
they were called ATBs (all terrain bicycles) and other things. Surely the
name “mountain bike” would be bad marketing, because people in
non-mountainous areas wouldn’t want one.

But they did. Just as people buy SUVs mainly because they “look cool”
(surely not for the bad gas mileage, rough ride, and expensive tires), a
mountain bike had the same mystique and association with adventure. Even if
you were only riding (driving) to the store to get some milk, the vehicle
calls to mind thoughts of riding in faraway, rugged places.

So today they call them mountain bikes, and people have figured out you
don’t need a mountain. In fact, I read several years ago that 90% of
mountain bikes are never ridden off pavement.

Brief rant: The same goes for SUVs. The vast majority of people don’t drive
them off road (the ones that are designed for this), and usually never need
most of the “utility” features. Then there are the ones who try to tell me
they have more room in theirs than I have in my minivan. They don’t. Even
the abominable Ford Excursion has less cargo space than my Grand Caravan. I
drive one of the most useful motor vehicles on Earth. How come people keep
asking me how many kids I have? :frowning:

So we call them mountain unicycles, to latch on to the popularity of
mountain bikes. And it has worked. Mountain unicycling has gotten tons of
mainstream press in the last few years, where more traditional forms of
unicycling do not seem to have had an increase. People like the adventure
sports connotation.

> cuz were i am, its impossible to ride up the mountain.

I’m not in that great of shape either :slight_smile: But at least we have mountains.
Most people don’t. Do you need a mountain to ‘mountain unicycle’? No. So
where does one draw the line?

I don’t think a line is truly necessary. Soon as you do, you start finding
exceptions. But as a loosely defined line, I would say the edge of the
pavement. If you’re off the pavement (and outside), it can be MUni. But I
also consider Trials to be a branch of MUni, and this is often done on (or
above) pavement. So you can do Muni there as well.

But in general, in my mind, MUni means riding off the pavement. Could be a
dirt road, grass, sand, or whatever there is. It doesn’t have to be steep,
extra bumpy, or anything special, just not paved.

So why MUni and not Muni? I’m the guy who started this, so I’ll explain.
First, type “muni” into a search engine. What do you get? The San Francisco
Municipal Railroad, muni bond funds, and municipal this and that. On Yahoo I
was impressed to see Sarah and Paul’s Muni Page ranked #3, wow! But the next
unicycling-related hit was #10.

Plus, Pashley was introducing a unicycle called the Muni, and rumor has it
they registered this name as some sort of a trademark. So I wanted to
identify the sport in a way that wouldn’t step on Pashley’s toes. Hey, they
were promoting our sport in the most concrete way possible!

Seeing MUni, with the capital U, should make people look twice and see that
it’s probably not their standard idea of what the word muni is used for. So
I chose the spell-checker-frustrating “MUni.” Computer companies mangle the
English language worse all the time, so I feel we’re not doing too much
harm.

Stay on top,
John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone
"The guy who added the capital “U” to MUni!

(Duncan Castling gets credit for the other three letters)

Hey Brokenframe… or whatever your real name is.

I see that you are from terrace. I am from Houston (Topley)… not there now… but I will be there this summer. Let me know if you want to go for a ride… ilcox@unicyclist.com

Yeah, I know this is the wrong spot for this.

Ian

Re: Your defiinition of Mountain Uni’n?

On Wed, 8 May 2002 12:47:11 -0700, John Foss <john_foss@asinet.com>
wrote:

>So today they call them mountain bikes, and people have figured out you
>don’t need a mountain. In fact, I read several years ago that 90% of
>mountain bikes are never ridden off pavement.
>
>Brief rant: The same goes for SUVs. The vast majority of people don’t drive
>them off road (the ones that are designed for this), and usually never need
>most of the “utility” features.

Brief question (not ranting) on your use of “the same”: which part of
Sports Utility Vehicle do you think points to off road use?

BTW, after having read a few restrictive definitions of Muni/MUni, I
was relieved to learn that my relatively light off road riding is
included in your definition of MUni. That’s heartening.

Klaas Bil

“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked automagically from a database:”
“Fernspah, tank, JITEM”

Been thinkin,

welli been thinkin… I came up with this,.

 MUni what people would defin it as, might change with the terrain they ride,or live around like in say a place that doesnt have steep hills/mountains, but have long sloping hills of some trees and brush, they would call that MUni.  Or like me, in the Coast Mountains, with fairly steep mountains, with big trees, and stuff would call that MUni.

Anyways…

> cuz were i am, its impossible to ride up the mountain.

I’m not in that great of shape either :slight_smile: But at least we have mountains.
Most people don’t. Do you need a mountain to ‘mountain unicycle’? No. So
where does one draw the line?

Im in good shape, just that the logging roads here are just to steep to ride up, even if you had ver strong legs,or a coker, (wouldnt that be easier with the bigger tire to ride up a steeper grade?) the roads have loose gravel, potholes and are just not that well upkept, partly cuz there old, and unused, and the new ones are not bein used that much now because the saw mills have slowed right down and there is no need to bring logs out of the bush, cuz of the whole American tariff. but whatever, this is suposed to be about unicycles not Canadian/American disputes.

jesse737373 first of all you would probably need shimizu legs but you’re not a skater so you wouldn’t know(or are you?).

I dont skate anymore, i used to play ice hockey for 7 years.

Well thats all i have to say for now.

MUni has such a nice ring to it…as does MUnicycling,

cf ATU or RTU or UMX

By the way, I thought ‘mountainbike’ was originally a brand name for all terrain bicycles. It got so widely used that everyone called them ‘mountainbikes’. Just like the guys that make Cellotape had to change their name to something else because everyone was making cellotape.

yes i am a speedskater. I got 7th in nationals this year for short track and 7th for north americans(I beat the american champion! Canadians got 1-7th ha) anyway im just lettin you know that i know what im talking about:)

RE: Your defiinition of Mountain Uni’n?

> Brief question (not ranting) on your use of “the same”: which part of
> Sports Utility Vehicle do you think points to off road use?

You need big knobby tires and high ground clearance to drive on pavement?
But my statement applied only to the ones built for off-roading. Some are
not.

> BTW, after having read a few restrictive definitions of Muni/MUni, I
> was relieved to learn that my relatively light off road riding is
> included in your definition of MUni. That’s heartening.

I guess if you live in Holland, you would hope there wasn’t a minimum
altitude… :slight_smile:

JF

RE: Your defiinition of Mountain Uni’n?

> MUni has such a nice ring to it…as does MUnicycling,

I agree, as long as you’re using the common pronunciation:
“M’you-knee”

> By the way, I thought ‘mountainbike’ was originally a brand
> name for all terrain bicycles. It got so widely used that
> everyone called them ‘mountainbikes’. Just like the guys
> that make Cellotape had to change their name to something
> else because everyone was making cellotape.

Welcome to the wonderful world of trademarking and branding. I recall a
similar story in the early days of the mountain bike, but can’t remember the
details. There was definitely a product name dispute involved.

In my work, I do lots of Web pages for Intel Corporation. The value of the
Intel brand, and it’s association with the Intel Inside program and other
uses, is valued in the billions of dollars. So needless to say, they are
very protective of their brand, and have strict rules for when and where to
use circle-r’s (®) and trademark symbols (™). Hope those show up in your
mail reader.

Many a product name has lost it’s original owner because of coming into
common use without being protected by them. Items like Kleenex, Frisbees,
cellophane, Velcro, etc. Some of those might still be recognized as
trademarks, but they are examples of “endangered” ones.

Depending where you live you may have heard an advertising jingle that went
“I am stuck on Band-Aid, 'cause Band-Aid’s stuck on me.” Remember that one?
Now it’s different: “I am stuck on Band-Aid brand 'cause Band-Aid’s stuck on
me.” That’s the company protecting themselves from their product name
becoming generic. By the same token, you should never see the Intel (or
Coca-Cola) logo without its accompanying circle-r.

Pashley made the world’s first purpose-built mountain unicycle (or rough
terrain unicycle), and called it the Muni. I don’t know if they have any
legal trademarking on this name, but the unicycling community recognizes
that they were the first to use it for business purposes. I think that means
something if it comes into dispute at a later time.

I hope that was interesting reading… :slight_smile:

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone
jfoss@unicycling.com

“If people want to truly understand mountain biking, they have to do two
other things: ride a unicycle, and master the trampoline.” – Joe Breeze,
one of the originators of mountain biking, in a conversation with Tim Bustos

Re: Your defiinition of Mountain Uni’n?

On Thu, 9 May 2002 09:21:15 -0700, John Foss <john_foss@asinet.com>
wrote:

>I guess if you live in Holland, you would hope there wasn’t a minimum
>altitude… :slight_smile:

You bet! Most of my unicycling is done BELOW sea level.

Klaas Bil

“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked automagically from a database:”
“ISG, Competitor, bird dog”