Yesss!

It may seem like small stuff to y’all but I broke the twenty foot barrier
yesterday. I practice on an outdoor roller hockey rink and was always having a
real hard time making it from blueline to centerline (about twenty feet).
Yesterday I went from blueline to blueline!

I don’t know if this is good technique but I found that griping the seat tighter
between my thighs gave me the extra stability. I guess that once I get
consistent, I’ll try learning to freemount.

It’s amazing how good one can feel with such seemingly small
accomplishments. Jim

Re: Yesss!

>It may seem like small stuff to y’all but I broke the twenty foot barrier
yesterday.

Way ta go!

I’ve been riding since October of last year and I can sure relate to your
feeling of joy. There have been many times that a person could have seen me out
on my uni practicing at the local tennis court, arms outstretched, head back, an
exuberant “YES!” being exclaimed to the heavens, after I had just performed a
skill for the first time.

I remember telling my daughter Leslie when I first started riding last year that
someday I would be able to ride the entire loop around our neighborhood without
stopping, which is about 2 miles in length on the sidewalks down various streets
and cul-de-sacs. She didn’t believe it, and I hardly did either at the time;
only being able to just barely make it down the driveway.

Since then, I have ridden farther than that distance several times, but up until
this weekend I still hadn’t achieved that particular accomplishment. I had tried
to do it a couple times this spring but was foiled once by a major frost-heave
in a sidewalk, and the second time by a parked car blocking the sidewalk just a
quarter mile from home (reinforcing my hatred of cars). Well, I had some free
time yesterday afternoon so I tried it and did it. Yippee! I made it over all
the bumps and even rode over a sprinkler hose (easy!). Another one for the
record books!

That is one thing I really love about unicycling. You can go out almost every
day and do something that you have never done before.

>I don’t know if this is good technique but I found that griping the seat
>tighter between my thighs gave me the extra stability.

I remember doing that too. It helped me go straighter. After awhile I found that
I didn’t need to do it anymore. When you learn to put your weight on the seat
not the pedals, you will have more control.

>I guess that once I get consistent, I’ll try learning to freemount.

Freemounting is a blast. You’ll definitely be ready to celebrate when you can do
that. Keep us posted.

-Rick

Re: Yesss!

Good one Jim, feels good don’t it !

J. Michaels wrote in message <376BC4FA.43B99CA3@home.com>…
>It may seem like small stuff to y’all but I broke the twenty foot barrier
>yesterday. I practice on an outdoor roller hockey rink and was always having a
>real hard time making it from blueline to centerline (about twenty feet).
>Yesterday I went from blueline to blueline!
>
>I don’t know if this is good technique but I found that griping the seat
>tighter between my thighs gave me the extra stability. I guess that once I get
>consistent, I’ll try learning to freemount.
>
>It’s amazing how good one can feel with such seemingly small
>accomplishments. Jim

Re: Yesss!

“J. Michaels” wrote:
>
> It may seem like small stuff to y’all but I broke the twenty foot barrier
> yesterday.

Hey, congratulations Jim! The first time I wobbled off down the street for a
hundred yards, I was so thrilled! I’m just learning too, my first decent ride
was probably about 2 months ago. I’ve since been working on turning and most
recently on free mounting. It’s been a lot of fun, but I don’t know any other
unicyclists, so it’s hard to find someone who can congratulate me on my small
victories.

> I don’t know if this is good technique but I found that griping the seat
> tighter between my thighs gave me the extra stability.

Also makes your legs sore! You’ll probably find that after you get accustomed to
the balance of the unicycle, you’ll relax a lot. At that poin, you won’t get so
sore and it’ll be a lot less tiring to ride.

>I guess that once I get consistent, I’ll try learning to freemount.

This has taken a long time for me. I don’t know if I just started out wrong and
had to relearn/unlearn a lot to get there or what, but it’s been one of the more
difficult things I’ve worked on.

The one unicycle rider I know gave me some excellent advice on learning new
skills like this. He said, you can try and figure out what you need to do, but
if you just ride a lot and don’t worry so much about specific things, many times
things like turning and freemounting will just kind of come by themselves.
You’ll try it one day, and it’ll work. I’ve found this to be true. I can’t
explain why I can turn now when a month ago I couldn’t. I don’t think I’m
actually doing anything different, but it works now. I think it’s because of
getting more accustomed to the balance of just being on the unicycle. Once
that’s more together, other skills seem to come considerably easier.

> It’s amazing how good one can feel with such seemingly small accomplishments.

Oh yeah!! It’s definitely a great feeling!

Greg

Re: Yesss!

> Being a newbie and just learning could someone explain to me what a
> freemount is?

Freemounting is getting on your unicycle without holding on to anything else.

Go to http://www.unicycling.org/ for all sorts of unicycle information and
pictures. One thing to check out is “The 10 Skill Levels”. From there, you can
follow the link “Mount Unicycle Unassisted” for suggestions on some ways to
learn to freemount (if you don’t already know how).

Another method that’s not mentioned there, but that was easier for me to learn
is to lean forward over the unicycle and hold onto the wheel with one hand to
keep it from rolling when you put your second foot on a pedal. (It may sound
difficult, but it’s not really that hard.) I put my right foot on its pedal,
hold the seat front with my left hand, bend forward and grab the wheel with my
right hand, then step onto the left pedal while letting go of the seat (so I can
flail my left arm), then straighten up while pedalling away. You have to hold
the wheel forward of the top so you can push forward and down on the wheel to
counteract the action of the right foot trying to make the unicycle go
backwards.

Jim

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