worldrecord

Last weekend, Christian Hoverath from Germany set up a new world record at the National Unicycle Convention of Germany.

He managed the 800 metres in 02.06.34 minutes. The old world record was 02.07.62 by Marc Haefflinger.

Finally he won the title of the national overall racing champion.

Uber-Christian! Zer schnell!

Moritz,

According to the IUF Web site the existing world record was 02:21:91 set by Floyd Beattie at the US chanpionships in 1990. I know this information is wrong. As you said, Marc Haefliger had previously posted a time of 02:07:62 in international competition in the 800M. I know this because I have a copy of the results from UNICON 11, the event where Marc posted this time.

We obviously need to do a better job at posting accurate World Records. Christian should ensure that the IUF gets copies of all of the information needed (information about the nature of the competition, the track, the officials recording the time, the system used to record the time, what color socks he was wearing, etc.) to record his outstanding accomplishment. Normally this would be a problem for Christian since he is such a shy and modest person. In this case, however, it shouldn’t be too hard, as he is currently serving as the Vice President of the IUF.

Tom Daniels
Secretary / Treasurer
International Unicycling Federation, Incorporated

Re: worldrecord

On Mon, 23 Jun 2003 13:04:55 -0500, Moritz Hahn
<Moritz.Hahn.phnfb@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>He managed the 800 metres in 02.06.34 minutes.
That’s 22.80 km/h, or 14.17 mph.

What are the rules? Is the start including a freemount? A supported
standing start (like it officially is in the Obstacle Course, I
believe)? Or a flying start?

And the crank/wheel combo? Minimum 125 mm cranks? Wheelsize max 24",
and then what tyre width or max rollout?

I’m too lazy to look the answers up. (And not sure where they are in
the first place.)

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

“No two crotches are alike. If they are, I don’t want to know about it. - John Foss, on seat comfort.”

Bill,

The HTML version of the current IUF racing rules are at: http://www.unicycling.org/iuf/rulebook/iufrules/2racing.htm

You can find the USE rules at:

Per the IUF rules, adults must race on wheels of no more than 24" diameter where the outside diameter of the tire may not be larger than 24.333" (61.8cm) and crank arms may be no shorter than 125mm (5"). There are no restrictions in the rules on tire width.

Here is the definition of a legal racing start from the IUF rules: “Riders start mounted, holding onto a starting post or other support. Because unicycle riders need to be leaning before the starting gun fires, the Starter will give a four count start; “One, two, three, BANG!” This allows riders to predict the timing of the gun, for a fair start. There should be about 3/4 second between each number in the count, with the same amount of time between “One” and “Two” as there is between “Three” and BANG! Starters should practice this several times before the races begin. Riders start with the fronts of their tires behind the edge of the starting line that is farthest from the finish line. Running starts are not permitted in any race. However, a rider may start as far behind the starting line as he or she desires, provided the wheel does not move before the gun fires. Riders may lean before the gun fires, as long as their wheels do not move forward until the gun fires. Riders may place starting posts in the location most comfortable for them, as long as it doesn’t interfere with other riders.”

Tom Daniels
Secretary / Treasurer
International Unicycling Federation, Incorporated
and President
Unicycling Society of America, Incorporated

Re: worldrecord

On Mon, 23 Jun 2003 23:58:21 -0500, tadaniels
<tadaniels.pihqz@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>The HTML version of the current IUF racing rules are at:
>http://tinyurl.com/f3k2
Funny that the url converts to a tinyurl address (obscuring the typed
url) on the newsgroup and not on the forum. However, you made a typo
there. The correct url is
<http://www.unicycling.org/iuf/rulebook/iufrules/2racing.html>.

>Per the IUF rules, adults must race on wheels of no more than 24"
>diameter where the outside diameter of the tire may not be larger than
>24.333" (61.8cm) and crank arms may be no shorter than 125mm (5"). There
>are no restrictions in the rules on tire width.
I don’t think you should state both metric and imperial units in the
rules, especially so as they do not boil down to the same length or
diameter as in this case. For the wheel diameter it is quite close but
still not exact (0.009% difference). But for the crank length (5"
equals 127 mm) the difference is 2 mm, or 1.60%. Considering that the
new record is only 1.00% lower than the old record, such margins are
IMHO small enough to have more precise rules about crank length.

So if I may, I would suggest that only one unit system per measure is
chosen. Being an engineer spoonfed with S.I. units, I would of course
prefer metric units. With your credentials you must be able to remove
this ambiguity.

Sincerely,

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

“No two crotches are alike. If they are, I don’t want to know about it. - John Foss, on seat comfort.”

Re: Re: worldrecord

The wheel size conversion was done with some form of conversion calculation which is apparently wrong. The crank length conversion was done off the top of someone’s head (who will remain nameless), who was under the impression that 5" was equal to 127mm.

The rulebook is wrong.

The racing crank length we’ve been allowing all these years is 125mm. Since crank arms are almost universally made in metric sizes these days, the inch measurement is intended only as a rough equivalent. It should mention that the metric numbers are the specific ones.

Wheel sizes are a lot messier. You have what’s printed on the side of the tire, which is for some reason still in inches on 24" tires, and usually notoriously innacurate. The numbers on the sides of the tires are effectively nearly meaningless. We decided to allow up to 24 1/3 inches, to allow flexibility with tires from around the world.

The hard part is measuring tire diameter. Though you can use a tape measure around the circumference, this can really be a pain to do if you never tried it. And at the start line of a race, we don’t want to use up a lot of time.

The best way to do it would be with a tire-measuring tool. This would be some sort of oversized t-sqaure type of thing, with a right angle to put the tire into, and either a sliding piece, or just a fixed bar to tell you where the max. point is. Kind of like where kids have to measure themselves before riding certain amusement park rides.

I guess it could be even simpler in the form of a tire-sized slot. If the tire doesn’t fit in the slot, it’s too big. And tire pressure must be the equivalent of what the rider will use for the race.

Thanks for bringing that to my attention!

But one small point on the race that’s the subject of this thread. Was it held using IUF rules? If it was hosted by one of the BDR-connected clubs, probably. But it may have been something a little different…

Re: worldrecord

On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 14:54:27 -0500, johnfoss
<johnfoss.pjn6o@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

> The wheel size conversion was done with some form of conversion
>calculation which is apparently wrong.
It’s just the rounding. 24.333" is exactly 61.80582 cm. The difference
with the stated 61.8 cm is less than 0.06 mm. No way that you can
measure a tyre diameter that accurately (rubber is soft, tyre is not
round, there may be a hair on it, etc). But it is the principle that
counts: Don’t state two different diameters as THE rule.

>The crank length conversion was
>done off the top of someone’s head (who will remain nameless), who was
>under the impression that 5" was equal to 127mm.
That impression is correct but 5" is not equal to 125 mm. (I tried to
type 125 in capital numbers but it came out as !@%)

>We decided to allow up to 24 1/3
>inches
Now you’ve done it again by adding yet another diameter (although not
in the rules themselves). 24 1/3 is not equal to 24.333 although the
difference is really really small. OK that’s nitpicking but, you know,
the principle blablabla.

>I guess it could be even simpler in the form of a tire-sized slot.
That’s the way to go for merely checking compliance to a maximum tyre
size. I have measured actual tyre size in two ways:

(1) by holding a 90-degree-tool (how do you call that L-shaped thing?)
on the tyre, eyeballing that one leg of it as well as the uni frame
were vertical. Then just measure from the bottom of the other leg of
the L to the floor.

(2) by doing a rollout (and divide by the correct value of pi using a
‘sufficient’ number of digits).

But using the T-shape with the sliding thingie (as you suggested) is
probably more accurate.

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

“No two crotches are alike. If they are, I don’t want to know about it. - John Foss, on seat comfort.”