World Records

NOTE: I am answering this in public becuase this information should be of GREAT
interest to all unicyclists.

<Unicycle@aol.com> wrote:

>There are a couple of details about unicycle racing that I hope you can take a
>moment to answer for me, because your knowledge is more firsthand.
>
>1. The Wheel Walking records from Japan are incredibly fast. Can you confirm
> for me that it’s indeed a standing start, and that the distance is 30
> meters? I find 6.81 seconds hard to imagine! At 8 seconds (the old men’s
> record) I feel getting the record back is still within my grasp. I can’t
> come close to Kato’s 6.81.

Sorry to disapooint you, ol’ man, but it’s for real: the world record for men is
by Yuichiro at 6.81 for 30 meters from a standing start. And he is not the only
one who can do it in less than 7 seconds. The women’s record goes to Lisa
Shofuku at 8.11 seconds. I guess your days of glory are over :slight_smile:

Another, even more important subject. Here are what should no doubt be world
records for 100 meters on a 24".

    5" cranks Yuichiro Kato 12.68 seconds 4" cranks Yuichiro Kato
    12.29 seconds

Kato’s father told me that the latest edition of Guness Book as 12.11 seconds
for Peter Rosendahl. Is that really true? And under what conditions has this
been done? Where is Peter hiding, anyway…

The women’s record is as you state in OOW, Yumiko Ichikawa 14.9, but at the
Japanese NUM in Aomori Ai Hiroe did it in 13.65 seconds with 5" cranks BUT with
a flying start, so it doesn’t count, but is interesting info anyway. I guess
that the day for breaking the 12 second barrier is not far off…With my best
time at about 15.5, that’s a staggering difference :slight_smile:

IMPORTANT news from Japan. Our rules committee, under the strong guidance of
Kato’s father, has formally abandoned the free crank length for experts and went
back to 5" to stay in line with the IUF. But ironically we are now going the
other way !? :slight_smile: I’ve always maintained that crank length should NOT be
unrestrcted.

Ken, the above can perhaps be incorporated into an article for UI, including
John’s info on world records – a subkect everyone is no doubt interested in.

>
>2. Are the Funabashi races held on a standard track, or something else?

Yes, completely standard.

>Note: The JUA 1 Foot race is non-compatible with the IUF and USA version. We go
> 50m with a 5m starting distance, JUA goes 30m with a 7m starting
> distance.
>
>The purpose of both questions is to make sure these events have all been held
>under similar conditions to what are used at UNICONS or at USA competitions. My
>new spreadsheet with the speed records has all times for IUF-legal racing
>unicycles, a few extra ones for those unicycles on indoor (200 m) tracks, a
>third section for unlimited unicycles (including those old 1888 records), and a
>section for 24" wheels with unlimited crank length. When I get it finished I’ll
>upload it for public consumption.

And for translatino to Japanese. Thanks for you efforts, John.

Stay on top, Jack Halpern, IUF Vice President

Re: World Records

Hello,

    What were the absolute speed records set on and why were they so fast in
    1888? Could you please tell me what the records actually were.
    Particularly what is the absolute speed record? ie. the fastest anyone
    has ever ridden a unicycle, of any dimensions. Also have there been any
    recent attempts at breaking these very old record?

    I am in the middle of making a low rise carbon giraffe at the moment
    with a three speed gear. If this was geared up suitably it could
    theoretically be ridden very fast. Would this be the right sort of
    unicycle to have a go at breaking such records?

                            Mark Rushton

Re: World Records

M.G. Rushton <93mgr@eng.cam.ac.uk> wrote:

> What were the absolute speed records set on and why were they so fast in
> 1888? Could you please tell me what the records actually were.
> Particularly what is the absolute speed record? ie. the fastest anyone
> has ever ridden a unicycle, of any dimensions. Also have there been any
> recent attempts at breaking these very old record?

I don’t know off hand how fast the records were. However, they were very fast
since a typical wheel size might have been as large as 60 inches in diameter, 2
1/2 larger that a standard 24 inch today.

> I am in the middle of making a low rise carbon giraffe at the moment
> with a three speed gear. If this was geared up suitably it could
> theoretically be ridden very fast. Would this be the right sort of
> unicycle to have a go at breaking such records?

No, a giraffe will be much harder to control than a big wheel standard, thus
speeds on a big wheel will always be far greater than on the far more stable
big wheel. Note that the axle of a big wheel will never move forward or
backward relative to the wheel, whereas this is the major control problem on a
geared up giraffe!

Sincerely,

Ken Fuchs <kfuchs@winternet.com

Re: World Records

“M.G. Rushton” <93mgr@eng.cam.ac.uk> wrote:
>Hello,
>
> What were the absolute speed records set on and why were they so fast in
> 1888? Could you please tell me what the records actually were. Particularly
> what is the absolute speed record? ie. the fastest anyone has ever ridden a
> unicycle, of any dimensions. Also have there been any recent attempts at
> breaking these very old record?
>
John, you’re our records man. ITs agood question, And I’d like to see old
records included in the records sheet you’re compiling…

Regards, Jack Halpern

Kanji Dictionary Publishing Society 1-3-502 3-Chome Niiza, Niiza-shi, Saitama
352 JAPAN Voice: +81-048-481-3103 Fax: +81-048-479-1323

Re: World Records

Ken Fuchs wrote:
>
> No, a giraffe will be much harder to control than a big wheel standard,

Ok I have it so far…

thus speeds on a big wheel will always be far greater than ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
on the far more stable big wheel. ^^^^^^^^^^^^ Eh?? I don’t get it, what
do you mean?

Note that the axle of a big wheel
> will never move forward or backward relative to the wheel, whereas this is the
> major control problem on a geared up giraffe!

or this? How can the fixed axle of any wheel move foreward relative to
the wheel??

Surely the wheel moves WITH the wheel and not independantly of it…

The only problem i can see with the geared up uni of any size is the ratio of
pedal turns to wheel turns, the difference being hard to get used to without the
aid of another wheel(as in a geared bicyle) to stabalise the uni along the line
of travel…

Sorry i said the B word but it was necesarry…
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Ken Fuchs <kfuchs@winternet.com>

Comments are welcome as are corrections…


///////////////////////\ Balls-up! : Homepage at :
http://www.ncl.ac.uk/~njugsoc/ E-mail on : balls@ncl.ac.uk Juggle on :
forever… ///////////////////////

Re: World Records

I’ve corrected a few critical errors to my response to the following question:

> I am in the middle of making a low rise carbon giraffe at the moment
> with a three speed gear. If this was geared up suitably it could
> theoretically be ridden very fast. Would this be the right sort of
> unicycle to have a go at breaking such records?

My corrected response follows:

No, a giraffe will be much harder to control than a big wheel standard, thus
speeds on a big wheel will always be far greater on the far more stable big
wheel. Note that the crank shaft of a big wheel will never move forward or
backward relative to the wheel, whereas this is the major control problem on a
geared up giraffe. Also, a giraffe almost always has more play in the drive
system, which when geared up becomes a major balance problem!

What follows is a detailed response to the errors pointed out by “Balls up!”.
Thanks for letting me know my original response didn’t sense.


>Ken Fuchs wrote:
>> No, a giraffe will be much harder to control than a big wheel standard,

Balls up! <balls@ncl.ac.uk> wrote:

>Ok I have it so far…

>> thus speeds on a big wheel will always be far greater than
> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>> on the far more stable big wheel.
> ^^^^^^^^^^^^ Eh?? I don’t get it, what do you mean?

Sorry, I didn’t proof read it very well. Omit the word “than” and the sentence
will be as originally intended.

>> Note that the axle of a big wheel will never move forward or backward
>> relative to the wheel, whereas this is the major control problem on a geared
>> up giraffe!

>or this? How can the fixed axle of any wheel move foreward relative to
>the wheel??

I should have said the crank shaft, which on a big wheel is the same as the
wheel axle. But these are two separate axles on a giraffe …

That’s the point! It can’t! However, the crank axle of a giraffe is
constantly shifting backward and forward of wheel axle in response to the
rider’s balance system.

Add this to the fact that a giraffe will almost always have more play in the
drive system than a standard big wheel. When a giraffe is geared up to a high
gear inch, the inherent play in the drive system goes from a minor irritation to
a major control problem, because the drive system is no longer responsive enough
to maintain precise control over the wheel. Riding such a machine is not fun,
unless one enjoys struggling to maintain control of a unicycle.

Sincerely,

Ken Fuchs <kfuchs@winternet.com