Winter blues

It’s dark when I leave work, never mind when I get home, and it seems to have rained every day for ever. From riding 3 - 4 nights a week, I’m down to half an hour in the Morris hall on Thursdays, and rare opportunities to go out at weekends.

I took the Coker out yesterday on one of my ‘stand by’ routes around the local country park. I was surprised I could even remember how to mount it! The previously solid tracks and wide aprons of grass are now a slimy quagmire - OK for MUni, but not if you just want a smooth fast ride to blow the cobwebs away, and the uni ends up filthy. And the recent storms have brought trees down over some of my favourite narrow paths.

I’m getting tired of winter already. Someone change the season.

On the positive side, even taking it steady I averaged comfortably over 9 mph and no one asked about my missing wheel. No UPDs and only one missed mount. :0)

I know exactly what you mean… it’s awful when you want to go for a ride only to look out the window to notice it’s flinging it down.

I used to uni to lectures and from A to B, but due to the lack of mudguard and limited trouser washing capacity I don’t do that any more.

Although having said that I actually managed a muni today, after the rain stopped… I got absolutely covered in mud, it was great fun. I’ve never ridden through mud and slime that thick before… blummin’ great fun sliding all over the place.

Phil, just me

I’ve had clear weather for all of our long Thanksgiving weekend, Wednesday, 27 November through today, 1 December. I’ve gotten to ride Blue Shift (no winter blues there, ha, ha, ha) for long test rides (10-15 miles) each day. Everything is dry and it’s easy to find long, flat stretches of asphalt on the numerous city bike trails. The weekend before was clear also. Are we on the same planet?

by living in the pacific northwest i would have expected sheets of cold water by now?but like Harper says,its been realy nice here.Cold but dry.

phil,you need to find a good covered area or a underground parking garage.somewhere with a few things to hop on and no bobbie’s

In York? Heh… :slight_smile:

Good idea, though… I shall look out for one. Dunno where, though…

Phil, just me

theres got to be a covered area somwhere.how about a elementary school?

Re: Winter blues

phil wrote:
> I used to uni to lectures and from A to B, but due to the lack of
> mudguard and limited trouser washing capacity I don’t do that any
> more.

The former is easily solved. I fitted a mudguard to my Coker after getting
wet on the way home from work one evening, one designed to mount to the
seatpost of an ATB.

The latter is also easily solved, though you may get chilly riding without
trousers at this time of year. I couldn’t comment on the effects of turning
up trouserless to lectures, but I suppose you could carry a pair in a
rucksack.


Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny )
Recumbent cycle page: http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/
“He who dares not offend cannot be honest.” - Thomas Paine

Re: Re: Winter blues

“Hey, you’ve lost… erm… err… yes, a wheel… umm…”

Phil, just me

You could all fly south for the winter :smiley:

I think I might just go for a ride now- it’s a beautiful warm day outside- not a cloud in sight! Even better- long daylight hours to go riding after work.

Ken :smiley: :smiley: :smiley:
(Basking in the southern hemisphere summer)

Re: Winter blues

You could try visiting us in California. Four of us went on a really nice 36
mile ride today under clear skies. I brought just a T-shirt and sweated a
lot - didn’t even think of taking a jacket, and that’s for a 5 hour ride!
Technically it’s not winter quite yet and I’m sure we’ll have our share of
rain one of these days…

—Nathan

“Mikefule” <Mikefule.ezzla@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:Mikefule.ezzla@timelimit.unicyclist.com
>
> It’s dark when I leave work, never mind when I get home, and it seems to
> have rained every day for ever. From riding 3 - 4 nights a week, I’m
> down to half an hour in the Morris hall on Thursdays, and rare
> opportunities to go out at weekends.
>
> I took the Coker out yesterday on one of my ‘stand by’ routes around the
> local country park. I was surprised I could even remember how to mount
> it! The previously solid tracks and wide aprons of grass are now a
> slimy quagmire - OK for MUni, but not if you just want a smooth fast
> ride to blow the cobwebs away, and the uni ends up filthy. And the
> recent storms have brought trees down over some of my favourite narrow
> paths.
>
> I’m getting tired of winter already. Someone change the season.

Just move to Texas. It’s in the 60’s most of the time, I can wear tee-shirts comfortably. No rain, no snow, no nothin’ except sun.

Riding throughout the winter is just as much fun as riding in the summer. Once the ground freezes in late fall it’s perfect for riding and when the snow starts to fall MUni rides become a challenge and are tons of fun. The various snow conditions completely change a trail and make it feel like a trail you’ve never ridden before.

When traction becomes an issue use a studded tire and chains. I have yet to try using a studded tire, but chains work relatively well.

That said, I do agree that the warm summer weather and more daylight make it my preferred time of the year for riding. Unfortunately, I live in the wrong country for year long warm weather.

Carl

Mike, I feel your pain. I don’t like cold rain and early sundowns, and the gym is too far away to walk and full of healthy young college kids anyhow. As a juggler I intend to try contact and refail at devilsticking, at least while the weather is bad. I made a freestanding ladder and learning it is a mild workout, there’s something you might consider until sunny skies return. On the bright side, they will close off the parkway soon, so I will have a place to go Cokering if the skies hold off.
Anybody else got a winter coping hint? carjug, Soon to do some cross-country skiing.

I really enjoy winter MUniing. Try to dress in layers and lower your tire pressure. It’s great fun.

The problem with our winter is that the ground doesn’t freeze up much and snow doesn’t start to fall, it’s just mudtastic all winter.

Joe

which is great if you like riding in mud, but for the more keeping dry inclined it does pose some problems.

Having said that, I’ve been riding for an hour or so most lunchtimes whilst working from home and been out night muni-ing lots and am muniing all weekend. When I commuted I loved riding home in the dark with lights on too.

I ride a unicycle down to the shops, especially when it’s raining because I get less wet if I’m faster.

I solved the unicycle becoming filthy problem ages ago by not cleaning it ever. If there’s too much mud on it, that’s a great excuse to go and ride until the mud falls off.

Joe

That’s alright for you lot who can keep their unis in the porch or garage or wherever; us poor students have to hide them away in our rooms. You can tell when I’ve been muni-ing, the floor is filthy…

Phil, just me

I’ve taken to doing a lot of trials riding in town because it’s so muddy it’s impossible to ride most of the trails round here.
When it rains we go down into the sub-terrainian loading bays underneath the pedestrian shopping area.
These rock, but you do have to teach the guard to unicycle before he’ll let you :slight_smile:

We’ve even got some palletts set-up and a skip. if my camera ever works again I’ll take a piccie.

The truth is, if it isn’t actually raining (or worse) or too windy, the main problem is motivation. Hard day at work, grey skies all day, then dark and damp in the evening, paths are muddy, and everything gets kacked up…

Got off my posterior this evening and did about 6 or 7 miles in about 50 minutes on the 28. I can’t say there was any time when it was unpleasant, except in a muddy section when the tyre, the darkness and my skill combined to horizontalize the uni rather too many times. It was more of a stroll than a blast though - plodding along a familiar route, scanning the ground for clues, and keeping the speed steady.

New head torch: it has 3 high powered LEDs. Princeton Tec. Very light weight, and not at all bulky.

It is brighter than a 2XAA Maglite, and best of all, there’s no dark circle in the middle of the illumination (the ‘shadow’ of the bulb). Highly recommended, although additional hand held lighting helps on the tricky bits.

I agree with you about the issue of motivation.

What Princeton Tec model are you referring to?

Have fun,
Fred