Wheel walk question

After about an hour of practicing I have this reflection:

One-foot riding is all about speed and power. It’s masculine. You crank up to speed and lift that foot and pump like mad.

Wheel-walking is all about balance and grace. It’s feminine. You sit up straight and say, “oh, my, I look pretty” and walk carefully away.

This is what’s going to help me learn, reminding myself that wheel-walking is all about balance. I’ve gone a whopping 11 feet and had brief intervals where I felt in control. Now I need to get out of my basement where there is more room.

Any advice? Groves would tell me to put on a tutu.

Re: Wheel walk question

He might also point out that the truth of the assesment depends on your taste in men or women.

Christopher

In a message dated 1/24/02 1:38:06 AM Eastern Standard Time,
forum.member@unicyclist.com writes:

> One-foot riding is all about speed and power. It’s masculine. You crank up
to
> speed and lift that foot and pump like mad.

If you get out in a flat open space, try practicing varying your speed, and
try going really slowly. Your control will improve quickly. You can ride
quite "delicately and gracefully this way, so don’t throw out the tutu!

Also, to borrow Dr. Stone’s word, learn to be ambipedalous. The payoff is
big. Try this exercise. Ride while alternating the feet you remove to an
odd-metered 5 or 7 beat rhythm. Each beat is half a rotation. It goes
something like this:
Off - 2 - 3 - On - 5 - of 2 - 3 - On - 5. (Foot off on one and back on on
4). 7 beats gives you more time to situate your foot back on the pedal. If
7 is still too hard, try 9 or 11 beats. It’s odd metered because you are
switching legs. Hopefully that’s clear. Soon you will be riding down the
street taking either foot off at will without thinking about it.

> Wheel-walking is all about balance and grace. It’s feminine. You sit up
> straight and say, “oh, my, I look pretty” and walk carefully away.
>
> This is what’s going to help me learn, reminding myself that wheel-walking
> is all about balance. I’ve gone a whopping 11 feet and had brief intervals
> where I felt in control. Now I need to get out of my basement where there
is
> more room.

Definitely. My one- legging took a big leap when I got out to an open space
to practice.

harper <forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote:
have to disagree. Not every one feels the same way about one footing.

> One-foot riding is all about speed and power. It’s masculine.

My one footing has never been that fast, and I feel very poised whist
one footing, especially on the coker. Oh and not at all masculine.

sarah

  British Unicycle Convention #9  April 19-21 2002

Unicycle Hockey, Games, Muni rides, Quidditch and Barn dance
Harry Cheshire High School, Habberley rd, Kidderminster
http://www.unicycle.org.uk/buc9/

On Thu, 24 Jan 2002 11:30:15 EST, Nycjoe@aol.com wrote:

>Also, to borrow Dr. Stone’s word, learn to be ambipedalous. The payoff is
>big. Try this exercise. Ride while alternating the feet you remove to an
>odd-metered 5 or 7 beat rhythm. Each beat is half a rotation. It goes
>something like this:
>Off - 2 - 3 - On - 5 - of 2 - 3 - On - 5. (Foot off on one and back on on
>4). 7 beats gives you more time to situate your foot back on the pedal. If
>7 is still too hard, try 9 or 11 beats.
Our music group plays pieces in 5/8, 7/8, 9/8, 11/16 and 13/8 meters
(Eastern European folk). Need a sample to keep in sync?

Klaas Bil

“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked automagically from a database:”
“public key encryption, SSL, ddos”

Re: Wheel walk question

then I guess I have no chance of ever learning. Put on a tutu.

sarah@vimes.u-net.com writes:
>> One-foot riding is all about speed and power. It’s masculine.
>
>My one footing has never been that fast, and I feel very poised whist
>one footing, especially on the coker. Oh and not at all masculine.

Wow – I am impressed. That Coker is too scary for me to 1-foot. I am not
sure I have even tried it on a 26" (I think I have). But it’s never even
happened on Roger by accident for more than one rev, and that was scary
enough. I have tried it a few times with a spotter but decided against
further efforts.

David

Co-founder, Unatics of NY
1st Sunday / 3rd Saturday
@ Central Park Bandshell
1:30 start time after 11/1/01

> One-foot riding is all about speed and power. It’s masculine. You
> crank up to speed and lift that foot and pump like mad.

Wow, you must do it fast! But it is definitely a “power” skill, especially
when you’re learning. Lots of power goes in during the parts of the pedal
stroke where you have control. But yes, to do it slowly takes more finesse.

> Wheel-walking is all about balance and grace. It’s feminine. You
> sit up straight and say, “oh, my, I look pretty” and walk carefully away.

For best results you have to sit up straight. Your position on the seat is
different from skills where your feet are on the pedals. You must move your
feet carefully to keep them from hitting each other. So I can see this.

But then on the other hand to beat Kato in a wheel walking race, you have to
be not only masculine, but fly your feet on that tire at the raw edge of
control!

> Any advice? Groves would tell me to put on a tutu.

I haven’t tried the tutu. Try to keep a gap between your heel and toe on the
tire. Don’t let your feet get too close together or they’ll knock each other
off. Use your toe and heel as they roll on and off the tire. There’s lots of
traction there. Keep your arms out, and swing them side to side to get the
steering down.

Enjoy,
JF

I found only one thing hard about 1-foot on Coker: getting up the guts
to
try it. Once you’re going, it’s no big deal and kind of fun. On a big
wide
open flat smooth surface that is.

—Nathan

“David Stone” <dstone@packer.edu> wrote in message
news:mailman.1011928715.8406.rsu@unicycling.org
> sarah@vimes.u-net.com writes:
> >> One-foot riding is all about speed and power. It’s masculine.
> >
> >My one footing has never been that fast, and I feel very poised
whist
> >one footing, especially on the coker. Oh and not at all masculine.
>
> Wow – I am impressed. That Coker is too scary for me to 1-foot. I am
not
> sure I have even tried it on a 26" (I think I have). But it’s never
even
> happened on Roger by accident for more than one rev, and that was
scary
> enough. I have tried it a few times with a spotter but decided against
> further efforts.
>
> David

Do you have samples online? I love Bulgarian music. Ivo Papasov would
get the wheel spinning. BTW, how do I respond to you directly (I guess I
need to alter your spam-proof address, but how)?
> Our music group plays pieces in 5/8, 7/8, 9/8, 11/16 and 13/8 meters
> (Eastern European folk). Need a sample to keep in sync?

On Fri, 25 Jan 2002 10:14:29 EST, Nycjoe@aol.com wrote:

>Do you have samples online?
It’s on my to do list. We have an audio page on our website already,
but it’s empty. Well, it’s a start.

>BTW, how do I respond to you directly (I guess I need to alter your
spam-proof address, but how)?
What you have to remove is “remove_the_spamkiller” (without the
quotes).

Klaas Bil

>> Our music group plays pieces in 5/8, 7/8, 9/8, 11/16 and 13/8 meters
>> (Eastern European folk). Need a sample to keep in sync?
>


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been
picked automagically from a database:”
“AIMSX, BOSS, tiger”

Hey,

I have recently started to try wheel walking and find it difficult with
my size
13 feet, does anyone else incounter this, or a similar problem?..

Thanx,

Keep on keepin on

Don’t worry, it’s not a problem. My feet are the same size, and I had
the
same thought when I first started wheel walking. I don’t remember
exactly
in what way I thought there wasn’t room, or where I found the room…
but
it’s there, don’t worry. I think the main thing is the foot goes down
farther than you might have thought at first… especially on a 20"
wheel.

lutkus

> Hey,
>
> I have recently started to try wheel walking and find it difficult
with
> my size 13 feet, does anyone else incounter this, or a similar
> problem?..
>
> Thanx,
>
> Keep on keepin on
>


> rec.sport.unicycling mailing list -
> www.unicycling.org/mailman/listinfo/rsu

Sent via the Unicyclist Community - http://Unicyclist.com

I have very dainty size 12 shoes. When I first started trying to wheel walk I thought that there’s no way those giant dogs were going to fit on that little wheel. To support my fears, my feet kept crashing into each other and hitting the sides of the wheel. But you’re not looking at your feet when you do this so you really don’t know where they are. After a little while you start to do it by feel. Again, it’s just like everything else you learn to do. It took me a while to learn to eat both left and right handed with chop sticks. But, like all other valuable skills, it was worth the effort.

> while to learn to eat both left and right handed with chop sticks.
But,

hmm, and I thought I was the only one who bothered to learn both hands.

Sent via the Unicyclist Community - http://Unicyclist.com

“Nathan Hoover” <nathan@movaris.com> wrote in message
news:u524jqtd46pnc2@corp.supernews.com
> I found only one thing hard about 1-foot on Coker: getting up the guts
to
> try it.

Surprising comment from someone who had the “guts” to ride down El Pico
de
Orizaba.

-mg

Greetings

In message “Re: 1-footing on a Coker”,
Michael Grant wrote…
>
>“Nathan Hoover” <nathan@movaris.com> wrote in message
>news:u524jqtd46pnc2@corp.supernews.com
>> I found only one thing hard about 1-foot on Coker: getting up the
guts to
>> try it.
>
>Surprising comment from someone who had the “guts” to ride down El
Pico de
>Orizaba.

I second that – Is aw that fantastic video and keepshowing it to my
friends…

BTW, you cam see a clear picture of me riding Japan’s first Coker one-
foot here:

   <a href="http://www.kanji.org/kanji/jack/unicycle/images/coker-1foot.jpg">http://www.kanji.org/kanji/jack/unicycle/images/coker-1foot.jpg</a>

Stay on top, Jack Halpern
Executive Director for International Development
International Unicycling Federation, Inc.
Website: http://www.kanji.org

I still can’t use chopsticks!
Dustin
Zupancic

“Jeff Lutkus” <lutkus@unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:mailman.1012065514.24338.rsu@unicycling.org
> > while to learn to eat both left and right handed with chop sticks. But,
>
> hmm, and I thought I was the only one who bothered to learn both hands.
>

> Sent via the Unicyclist Community - http://Unicyclist.com

I still can’t use chopsticks!
Dustin
Zupancic

“Jeff Lutkus” <lutkus@unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:mailman.1012065514.24338.rsu@unicycling.org
> > while to learn to eat both left and right handed with chop sticks. But,
>
> hmm, and I thought I was the only one who bothered to learn both hands.
>

> Sent via the Unicyclist Community - http://Unicyclist.com

Chopsticks both hands: sounds kinda greedy to me…trying to quickly grab
all the best bits at the communal dim sum lunch maybe? :wink:
Nah, your left hand is what your rice bowl is for…much easier to
shovel the chickens feet from bowl to mouth with chopsticks in one hand and
the bowl in the other. Although…what the rice bowl is
for…the phrase just reminded me of the chinese girl in that video,
riding a giraffe one footed on top of a walking globe whilst tossing 4 rice
bowls from a balance on her ankle, to land, click,click,click,click into
another rice bowl balanced on her head. I suppose being chinese she would
be allowed to say THAT is what the rice bowls should really be used for.
Maybe I should aim lower: er…anyone got a second pair of chopsticks?

harper <forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:a2ukna$8ka$1@laurel.tc.umn.edu
>
>
> I have very dainty size 12 shoes. When I first started trying to
> wheel walk I thought that there’s no way those giant dogs were going
> to fit on that little wheel. To support my fears, my feet kept
> crashing into each other and hitting the sides of the wheel. But
> you’re not looking at your feet when you do this so you really don’t
> know where they are. After a little while you start to do it by feel.
> Again, it’s just like everything else you learn to do. It took me a
> while to learn to eat both left and right handed with chop sticks.
> But, like all other valuable skills, it was worth the effort.