What unicycle should I get next?

I currently have a cheap generic 20" unicycle (with 125mm cranks) that
I am reasonably proficient on.

I cannot do any tricks but can cycle reasonably far on it. I have good
balance and am reasonably fit but find it very tiring cycling any
distance. I cycled 2 miles into town today (road/pavement) and was
exhausted.

My real interest is cycling some distance on roads (not off-road) and
developing a few simple tricks.

Would I benefit from a larger wheel and/or a better unicycle? If so,
what aize and any particular make would you recommend?

Also, is there anywhere in South East that I can try a few different
unicycles?

Alan Steele

I would say to either get a 29’’ unicycle, or a 36’’ unicycle. The bigger diameter tires help a lot when it comes to distance riding. If you have the money i would recommend a Coker 36’’ unicycle, or a Kris Holm 36’’ unicycle. Or, i know lots of people use 29’’ unicycles too, which ive seen a few places online where you can buy them fairly cheap (around $100, but you get what you pay for). You could probably use This unicycle, although its slightly cheaper made (dont quote me on that) than the other’s of its brand. Theres also this Coker unicycle, which does fairly well i think.

Good luck!

Re: What unicycle should I get next?

Thanks for that.

How different are the bigger wheels to ride though?

I am about 5’ 8" with fairly short legs. I find my 20" easy and can
imagine riding a 29" but how about 36"?

Will I still be able to mount and do simple tricks etc. easy/possible
with 29" or 36" wheels?

Alan

Well, i dont know how it’d feel really, since i dont own one, but i’m sure someone respond and tell their info. But, i know that

can do some tricks on 36’ers and 29’ers. In that vid, he rides a 20’‘, a 29’‘, and a 36’'. I’m sure you’ll tell the difference.

It would probably be better to step up to a 29" before making the transition to a 36". The 29" wheel size is fairly light, easily maneurverable, is good for moderate distances and commuting, and will be easier to transition to than a 36". You definitely Could ride a 36 if you wanted to. Check out unicycle dot com, they have a great selection of unicycles in both sizes. Also if you mention where you are located, someone here may be willing to let you try one of their unicycles (if you live close enough)

I would get a 36er if your intrested in distance. You can use your current 20 inch to do tricks on, I would suppose.

I think getting a 29er before getting a 36er is actually a waste of money.

When you get a 29er because you want to try it out before you get a 36er then all you want is a 36er and the 29er just isn’t enough. Having a 29er is nice but it is a completely different beast to a 36.

Wherabouts in the Southeast are you?

Looks like Worthing. That’s not too far from funkytown these days if I recall correctly.

To answer the original question, yes, a 36" unicycle is probably the best for distance. However, it is a huge step up from a 20", and will almost be like learning to ride for the first time all over again. I’d suggest a Nimbus 29er as a great value for money commuting unicycle. It’s still a large change from a 20", but is much more do-able, and will give you a feel for distance unicycling. If all goes well, then maybe change up to a 36er in the future.

STM

If you get a 36er make sure to get 150mm or larger cranks to start with. it makes learning much better.

I started out with 125s under the advice of Adam Cohen (just1wheel). I thought it was pretty easy to adapt to. I’m using 102s now.

I think this is largely dependent on confidence and the person’s riding style. The first time I tried a coker with longer cranks I hated it, I had to ride it about 10 KM to get it home and the whole time I was wishing I had shorter cranks. I was used to smaller wheels and shorter cranks and so the huge cranks really through me off. The second I got the 125’s on it felt sooo much better.

There is no 29er in Terry’s video, only a 24"

I rode a 24dx for six months on and off then got my coker. Ya i did only use 150s for maybe 50-60 miles but when i put on the 125s,man its alot of diferance. Now im on 114s and mid next summer i will need something shorter.
150 just felt so solid compared to 125s to start.

I think that is you are already used to long cranks (as you were) it is easier to go to something with longer cranks. But since he is used to shorter cranks I’m suggesting he stick with what he has. At least not go any longer than 150’s.

Re: What unicycle should I get next?

Thanks for all the replies but I am now totally confused.

From this newsgroup the general feeling seems to be to go up to 29"
rather than 36" as this is already quite a big step up. It sounds as
if I will have a lot of learning to do with this.

unicycle.com (UK site) recommended 24" Nimbus II Unicycle though.

Should I consider a 24" or go up to a 29"?

I am worried that I am not good enough to cope with a massive wheel
and would find a 24" easier but, at the same time, I am worried that
24" is not big enough to justify the change!

Alan

A 24" unicycle will certainly be easier to master, and you’ll be able to go further and faster than on your current 20". If your goal is riding longer distances, however, and particularly if you do this already on a bike, then you will outgrow the 24 in no time.

If you’re thinking of riding off road (muni - Mountain UNIcycling), then a 24" is generally accepted as the way to go. They good fun and easy to ride.

Ultimately, a 29 or 36 will be the best for distances though. Moving to a 29 from a 20 is a big step, but it is certainly manageable.

There’s not many about, but if you’re unsure about a 29er, then a 26 could work out as a good stepping stone. That’s what I did, although mine was custom made by cut’n and shut’n an old 20 I had lying about. It was fine for commuting in central London for a few months, but after I tried a 29 for a couple of weeks, I have never gone back to it.

STM

Re: What unicycle should I get next?

2008-11-17, 10:11(-08), Alan:
> Thanks for all the replies but I am now totally confused.
>
> From this newsgroup the general feeling seems to be to go up to 29"
> rather than 36" as this is already quite a big step up. It sounds as
> if I will have a lot of learning to do with this.
>
> unicycle.com (UK site) recommended 24" Nimbus II Unicycle though.
>
> Should I consider a 24" or go up to a 29"?
>
> I am worried that I am not good enough to cope with a massive wheel
> and would find a 24" easier but, at the same time, I am worried that
> 24" is not big enough to justify the change!
[…]

Just to add my 2p comments:

  • the crank arm length makes almost as much of a
    difference as the wheel size, and it’s cheaper to buy shorter
    cranks than a bigger uni. On a 26", I use 102mm for commuting,
    125mm for mild muni and used to use the 150mm when I was a
    bigginner at muni and use them now only for hard (steep) muni.
    And I’m waiting for my order for 90mm ones from udc.uk.

  • I don’t know why there are so few 26" models. It sound to me
    like the perfect compromise for road/muni/trial. And it’s easier
    to find tyres/tubes for it.

If you want a cheap uni and may consider muni in the future you
could go for the Pashley muni. It’s too heavy if you don’t plan
to do muni though. You will also probably want to change the
saddle.


Stéphane

I learned on a 26", so going from 20" to 29" shouldn’t be impossible. It will take some time to get used to, but if you start with longer cranks I think it’ll be OK.

Most tricks are harder to do on a larger wheel, what kind of tricks were you thinking of?

He’s riding 125mm cranks on a 20"; that’s extremely long cranks for that wheel size.

If your goal is to ride distances on roads, you’d be a lot better off with a 29er or 36". You can keep the 20" to do tricks on. A 24" is better for riding distances than a 20", but not by much; I would definitely say that the difference isn’t large enough to be worth making a 24" your next unicycle.

You won’t have significant trouble riding a 29"; it’ll take you one or two rides to get used to it. You even wouldn’t have significant trouble riding a 36", though that might take longer to feel really comfortable mounting and riding. They’re all just unicycles in the end.