What never to do with a Coker!

Never, never, never! No, no, no!

Do not, if you’re seriously thinking of selling it, take Coker out for two massively excellent (pardon the hyperbole) rides.

Coker, at least until after the LBI Unithon, is off the market.

Last night I went down for my usual ride at the NJ Transit train station. I rode around it a couple of times but then ventured off onto the streets. I only rode around a couple of blocks and was passed by just a few cars, but it felt good to be riding beyond my usual confines. After getting back into the parking lot I rode about 7 laps. This is a couple more than usual for me and I felt like I could keep going for much longer, but I needed to get home.

Tonight I drove over to the middle school near me. This is just about 1/4 mile from my house, but it is on the other side of a rather sharp curve where cars have very little idea what’s beyond them and mostly go too fast around it.

I started by riding around a couple of out of the way side streets with very little vehicular traffic, just to warm up. A few dogs barked at me and one woman saw me and yelled, “Hey ma, get out here. You gotta see this!”; ma didn’t make it and I didn’t feel like stopping (mostly because I didn’t want to have to mount again - my achilles heel as far as the Coker is concerned).

After this I rode down a very heavily trafficked street, but one which is wide enough for cars to give me lots of room. Lots of cars honked and a lot of kids were out playing a pretty excited to see a unicyclist.

As far as the riding is concerned it just plain feels good. Despite the fact that a Coker is not extremely maneuverable, one can control it given sufficient lead time. For the most part what holds me back from riding it out further is being able to freemount in narrow spaces; I am planning to give this serious attention.

Depending on how confident I feel about freemounting by the time the LBI Unithon is over will largely determine whether or not I sell it. Also, of course, whether or not I eventually get to try out a 28" or 29" unicycle and how I feel about it.

Well, for now and until May 31 it’s Coker all the way!

Cheers,
Raphael Lasar
Matawan, NJ

PS Emma just showed me that she’s mastered the reverse cascade!!!

Re: What never to do with a Coker!

My theory is that it is easier to make space in one’s garage and wallet to purchase an additional unicycle than it is to go through the selling (and possibly shipping) process only to know that someone else is out there riding your baby. The saving can be painful, but then once it’s over, you’ll be able to choose whether to ride your 29 or your coker.

BTW: when you free mount, are you doing so in the traditional way from a standstill? That gave me major pains, so instead I tried getting a one-pedal-revolution running start then hopping on when the pedals are almost horizontal. That has worked much better, as the momentum is there and you just have to keep peddling. TB

Re: Re: What never to do with a Coker!

I am not nearly tall enough to do a standstill (standard) mount with a Coker. I’m doing a rolling mount, but actually only do a half revolution before mounting. I have been positioning the left pedal half a rev away and rolling the Coker until its in position to hop up. I’ll try positioning it back and bringing it around a full rev before hopping up and see if the extra half turn helps me head straight rather than veering off, as I often do.

Thanks,
Raphael Lasar
Matawan, NJ

nawh,your just to lazy to go find a refrigerator size box necessary to ship that 36inch plague…

dont worry,that conue feeling will get boring and you’ll want a kayak again.

Jagur, were you by chance abused by a Coker as a child?:slight_smile:

Re: What never to do with a Coker!

I find that using your hand to hold the wheel so it does not move is a good
option for mounting the Coker. Because there is so much momentum in the
wheel it is not good to do a rockback mount with (I have only ever seen
Sarah do this).
If you place the pedals horizontal and then reach forward and hold the tyre.
Then jump up and haul with your hand at the same time you will find that you
can get onto the unicycle without the wheel moving at all and it places you
in a position ready to move. The big advantage to this mount is that it can
be done on hills and rough ground equally affectively. :slight_smile:

Have fun

Roger

----- Original Message -----
From: “JJuggle” <JJuggle.m0gy0@timelimit.unicyclist.com>
Newsgroups: rec.sport.unicycling
To: <rsu@unicycling.org>
Sent: Thursday, April 17, 2003 4:47 AM
Subject: Re: What never to do with a Coker!

>
> tomblackwood wrote:
> > *BTW: when you free mount, are you doing so in the traditional way
> > from a standstill? That gave me major pains, so instead I tried
> > getting a one-pedal-revolution running start then hopping on when the
> > pedals are almost horizontal. That has worked much better, as the
> > momentum is there and you just have to keep peddling. TB *
> I am not nearly tall enough to do a standstill mount with a Coker. I’m
> doing a rolling mount, but actually only do a half revolution before
> mounting. I have been positioning the left pedal half a rev away and
> rolling the Coker until its in position to hop up. I’ll try positioning
> it back and bringing it around a full rev before hopping up and see if
> the extra half turn helps me head straight rather than veering off, as I
> often do.
>
> Thanks,
> Raphael Lasar
> Matawan, NJ
>
>
> –
> JJuggle - Last of the Dogmato-Revisionists
>
> “In 11 years of performing, I’ve only hit my assistant on five
> occasions” - Jayde Hanson, world record knife thrower, after nicking his
> assistant live on British TV
>
>
> 5TH ANNUAL LBI UNITHON
> Long Beach Island, New Jersey
> Saturday, May 31, 2003
> http://jjuggle.unicyclist.com/lbiunithon
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> JJuggle’s Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/24
> View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/24664
>
>


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When I do a rolling mount on the Coker I need to remind myself to hold the seat handle really tight (I use a Miyata seat handle). If I don’t hold the handle tight enough the Coker likes to go off line or lean over as I do the roll up and jump. Grip the handle in a death grip as you mount and your success rate might improve dramatically.

i use a little momentum in the mount, and get on the pedal as it’s horizontal, as previously mentioned. Now mounting using 150’s seems marginally harder than mounting the 26" but not enought o strt looking for ‘options’ (like holding the wheel)

like everything else…practice till it’s comfortable!

In all fairness to Jagur, I had asked him about his experience selling his Coker and here is a direct quote from my PM to him:

Be that as it may, however, we’ll see where things go. I am enjoying Cokering quite a bit these days and plan to take it out tonight.

Raphael Lasar
Matawan, NJ

Freemouning the Coker is intimidating at first, and difficult when you’re tired. However, a year ago, I was freemounting my 20 about 50%, on one side only, and I now find I can freemount my Coker ‘almost’ 100% on my good side, and ‘usually’ on my weak side. I’m not bragging, just saying it can be done, so don’t be discouraged. I’m 5 foot 7, 145 pounds, and 40 years old, so if I can do it, anyone can.

I find this works for me: Put the pedals at 3 and 9 on the clock face. Put the seat in position, but only loosely. Put your foot on the back pedal. Hold the front of the seat. Let that back pedal drop slightly, then give a bit of a forward push to the uni, and step up using that back pedal as if it were a fixed step.

Done ‘perfectly’ the wheel moves neither forwards nor backwards.

Now here’s an important bit of my technique: I go pedal, pedal, stand, drop onto the seat. That is, I makes sure both feet are in position, and I’m balanced, before I put my weight on the seat. By keeping my weight high, I make things happen more slowly. Also, the weight is in a useful position because I can choose to let it fall ont either foot/pedal as needed to control the Coker or start it rolling.

Another thing that helps. I mount with my left foot first, leaping off my right foot… and I normally start with the wheel leaning slightly to the right, and even turned slightly to the right. This means that my shove and leap are not straight along the plane of the wheel, and this reduces the tendency for the wheel to roll away.

And rollback mounts? Yes and no. I don’t use a rollback mount as such, but on a smooth surface, I can do a mount on the Coker which uses a small amount of rollback, as well as the forward movement of the rider.

Stick with it. When mounting becomes a racing certainty, it’s easier to love the Coker.

try this easy Coker mount.

(easy because you don’t have to leap onto it)

Holding the seat with both hands, step onto the pedals and mount to seat in front. Surprisingly, it may be easier than a ‘normal’ mount

as you start to pedal, slide onto the seat :slight_smile: