What is a 10 X 10 cm obstacle in Level 3?

Jorga has started working to qualify for level 3. In the unicycling FAQ that I
have on my HD (posted by Beirne Konarski in 1997) one of the level 3
requirements is to “Ride over a 10 X 10 cm obstacle”. This is ambiguous. An
obstacle has 3 dimensions, I think. Do we have to read as a cube with sides of
10 cm? Or is it like a longish beam with a cross section of 10 x 10 cm that has
to be traversed? Or ridden along its length, possibly? Either way, is the object
fixed to the ground in some way, or is it part of the skill to attack the object
“gently” so that it does not move so much that you’re thrown out of balance? Or,
maybe, is it a 10 x 10 square of insignificant height,
i.e. a target that has to be hit? Etc etc I could go on. But the question
is serious.

Klaas Bil

“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “Osama bin Laden, Pentagon, Iraq”

Re: What is a 10 X 10 cm obstacle in Level 3?

Hello all.

Here in the TCUC we have a board that is 4"x4" by about 4 feet. If the rider
can jump sideways, forward, or ride over the obstacle they are considered to
have passed that part of the test.

Or if you don't want to go threw the work you could do jump up a curb for
those who can... maybe. im not real sure if that would count.

Re: [What is a 10 X 10 cm obstacle in Level 3?]

You want something with a 10x10 cross section. So you are looking for a piece of
wood or similar that is 10 cm high and 10 cm wide and can be any length. Usually
it is a long piece of wood (two 2 by 4 planks nailed together work well).
Sometimes you are lucky enough to find a concrete curb that fits the bill.

It is not a requirement that the obstacle be loose so you are allowed to have
people hold down either end of bolt it to the floor or some such.

A nice design is to make an H shape out of a lump of 10 by 10 cross section
wood. You can make the crossbar of the H quite wide like so
|-----|

This gives you a portable obstacle that won’t move to much when people try to
ride over it.

You can get over the obstacle any way you like including: -riding over it,
-hopping onto it and then over it -jumping over it

The important thing is to be on the unicycle the entire time. The easiest way
to clear the obstacle is to ride over it. Just when you hit the obstacle pull
up on your seat and lean back a little bit. This helps you get up over the
first bit and then you can ride down the other side. Pedal position is
important too. You want to hit the obstacle in the “power position” where you
have maximum leverage. It is quite OK to line up your unicycle, wheel it
backwards and then get on so that you are set up to hit the obstacle with your
pedals in the right place.

o o Peter Bier o O o Juggler, unicyclist and mathematician.
o/|\o peter_bier@usa.net


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RE: What is a 10 X 10 cm obstacle in Level 3?

> An obstacle has 3 dimensions, I think. Do we have to read as a cube with sides
> of 10 cm? Or is it like a longish beam with a cross section of 10 x 10 cm that
> has to be traversed? Or ridden along its length, possibly? Either way, is the
> object fixed to the ground in some way, or is it part of the skill to attack
> the object “gently” so that it does not move so much that you’re thrown out of
> balance? Or, maybe, is it a 10 x 10 square of insignificant height,
> i.e. a target that has to be hit? Etc etc I could go on. But the question is
> serious.

This question has arisen before, but I think Klaas has summed it up better than
ever. We do need to address this issue by adding a few words to the level.

In the past people have asked what the third dimension was, and I jokingly said
infinity, as I expected it didn’t matter. But above we can see that it does.
The 10 x 10 skill comes from the original USA levels, in which it was to ride
down a 6" curb.

Also please note that the rider is allowed to “ride or hop over a 10 x 10
cm. obstacle”, though this doesn’t change the fact that we should clarify
it.

What do you think? Should it be nailed down, loose, or unspecified?

Stay on top, John Foss President, Unicycling Society of America President,
International Unicycling Federation jfoss@unicycling.com www.unicycling.com

RE: [What is a 10 X 10 cm obstacle in Level 3?]

Gilby posted:

> From the USA Rulebook:
> 8.4.2 Level 3: 10 x 10CM obstacle: A standard 4" x 4", or two attached 2" x 4"
> pieces of lumber are acceptable to use, though smaller than
> 10cm. The obstacle should be a rigid solid object. The rider can ride or
> jump (forward or sideways) over the obstacle, using no external
> aids, as long as rider begins and ends the skill on the unicycle.
>
> So, that makes the 4x4 acceptable.

For the USA levels. There are slight variations between the USA version of the
10 levels and the IUF version. The USA has much more detail on how to pass the
levels, but there are a couple of spots where details deviate from the more
strict, yet less defined IUF levels. This is mostly very minor, with the
allowance of a slightly smaller obstacle, and seat allowed to touch the body in
seat out skills.

If you want to find out more about how to do the levels, check out the USA
version: http://www.unicycling.org/usa/levels/

The IUF levels are here: http://www.unicycling.org/iuf/levels/

The levels themselves should be identical. Only the interpretation has
variances.

> It used to be where different wheel sizes would have a different size obstacle
> to ride over, so for 16", it was something like 8 cm by 8 cm.

I think that was a TCUC thing, not part of an official set of levels.

For a humorous look at the levels, read about them on my site:
http://www.unicycling.com/iuf/levels.htm

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com www.unicycling.com

“Dad, I’m hypo-icecreamic.” – Woody Hooten, at the end of a long MUni ride
(Woody’s mom is a doctor, and this sounds like something his family probably
developed on long car rides)

Re: [What is a 10 X 10 cm obstacle in Level 3?]

Nathan Hoover wrote:
>
> Not to be too lame about this, but in the USA, a 4x4 is really about 9cm x
> 9cm. A true 4" x 4" board or two true 2x4s can be used and really do measure
> 10cm, but these are rare around where I live. But with a 3" Gazz, does
> it really matter? No, not at all. Maybe such tires should be outlawed
> for this specific test…

>From the USA Rulebook:
8.4.2 Level 3: 10 x 10CM obstacle: A standard 4" x 4", or two attached 2" x 4"
pieces of lumber are acceptable to use, though smaller than
10cm. The obstacle should be a rigid solid object. The rider can ride or
jump (forward or sideways) over the obstacle, using no external aids,
as long as rider begins and ends the skill on the unicycle.

So, that makes the 4x4 acceptable. It used to be where different wheel sizes
would have a different size obstacle to ride over, so for 16", it was something
like 8 cm by 8 cm.

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Re: [What is a 10 X 10 cm obstacle in Level 3?]

Not to be too lame about this, but in the USA, a 4x4 is really about 9cm x
9cm. A true 4" x 4" board or two true 2x4s can be used and really do measure
10cm, but these are rare around where I live. But with a 3" Gazz, does it
really matter? No, not at all. Maybe such tires should be outlawed for
this specific test…

—Nathan

“Peter Bier” <peter_bier@usa.net> wrote in message
news:20010321225910.27328.qmail@nwcst319.netaddress.usa.net
> You want something with a 10x10 cross section. So you are looking for a
piece
> of wood or similar that is 10 cm high and 10 cm wide and can be any
length.
> Usually it is a long piece of wood (two 2 by 4 planks nailed together work
> well). Sometimes you are lucky enough to find a concrete curb that fits
the
> bill.

Re: [What is a 10 X 10 cm obstacle in Level 3?]

Actually, I think it is a true 4"x4", but im not sure. I sould measure it
some time.

Max, The Mad Man

Re: RE: What is a 10 X 10 cm obstacle in Level 3?

john_foss@asinet.com writes:
>The 10 x 10 skill comes from the original USA levels, in which it was to ride
>down a 6" curb.
>
>Also please note that the rider is allowed to "ride or hop over a 10 x 10
>cm. obstacle", though this doesn’t change the fact that we should clarify
>it.
>
>What do you think? Should it be nailed down, loose, or unspecified?

Since it was initially about a curb, I’d make it whatever seems most curb-y.
That seems to be loose, since curbs tend to be quite long, so a rider can choose
many points at which to hop over.

For our British friends, curb = kerb.

David

Re: What is a 10 X 10 cm obstacle in Level 3?

On 21 Mar 2001 15:40:34 -0800, john_foss@asinet.com (John Foss) wrote:

>The 10 x 10 skill comes from the original USA levels, in which it was to ride
>down a 6" curb.
Looks like you are confusing with what I think is a level 2 skill,
i.e. “Ride down a 15 cm vertical drop”.

On the issue of fixed or loose, in addition to the reaxions in the newsgroup,
Dirk Iwema and Peter Bier have e-mailed clarifications (Peter included a
picture) and they mention a FIXED obstacle. Peter had some logic: “It is not a
requirement that the obstacle be loose so you are allowed to have people hold
down either end of bolt it to the floor or some such.”

Suggested rewording: “Traverse (e.g., ride, hop or jump over) a rigid beam of 10
x 10 cm cross section.”

To dwell on the subject: In our uni club, we train in a gym, and we use a
“springboard” (know what I mean?) for level testing. It is about
2.5 cm high on the low side and probably a little less than 15 cm on the high
side. For level 2, one has to ride over it from low to high, for level 3 the
same thing is used but in the other direction. Both are, err, in inaccurate
conformance to the actual rules. Incidentally, for most people riding up the
2.5 cm edge and the subsequent slope-up appears to be at least as difficult as
going down the 15 cm at the end.

Klaas Bil

“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “intelligence, anonymous remailer, Abdelbaset
Al Megrahi”