Walking the Wheel

I agree with Terry’s remarks; but I think that this is a trick that should be
learned with two friends, one on each side, for you to grab onto while you’re
getting your balance. I’ve Also noticed a tendency for people to hunch down
while learning – maybe out of fear of falling. The double buddy system can
give the learner confidence to keep the back straight.

Re: walking the wheel

In a message dated 95-12-06 01:24:46 EST, you write:

>HELP! I’m having trouble learning walk the wheel. I’m decent with a spotter but
>I can’t get going fast enough to go on my own. It feels like there’s not enough
>room on the wheel for my feet. How can I get going faster. I’ve only seen it
>once, so !!any instruction would be helpful!!

STEP ONE: Don’t try to go fast. If you try to go the same speed you go when
pedaling, you’ll be disappointed. You just can’t comfortably walk the wheel that
fast. Because you are going slower, you must be more careful with your balance.
Pay a lot of attention, and use your arms to help steer.

STEP TWO: Use your whole foot on the tire. Most people bang their feet together
when they’re learning to walk the wheel, and it’s a common reason for even the
most experienced walker to fall off. Always try to leave at least an inch or two
between your heel and toe. Keep your feet in line with the tire, and start by
placing the tip of your toe on, letting the whole bottom of your foot roll down
the tire, and finishing with the rear edge of your heel going down the front.
The edge of your heel has a lot of gripping power, so use it! Mainly, you have
to get used to the foot action, and to the fact that you just don’t go as fast
as when riding regular.

Let us know how things turn out!

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone Wheel walking speed record holder, 1981-1992
unicycle@aol.com

Re: Re: walking the wheel

John Foss wrote:
|>
|> STEP ONE: Don’t try to go fast. If you try to go the same speed you go when
|> pedaling, you’ll be disappointed. You just can’t comfortably walk the wheel

John,I see yo’re a master at describing this kind of thing, Why not have a
chapter in the FAQ on important skills, as we have in idling?

I personally would vey much like to see a good description of how to learn to
glide. Can anyone write this or has it been written and I missed it? I am,
unfortunately, an eternal beginning glider…

Regards, Jack Halpern

Re: Re: walking the wheel

>
> John Foss wrote:
> |>
> |> STEP ONE: Don’t try to go fast. If you try to go the same speed you go when
> |> pedaling, you’ll be disappointed. You just can’t comfortably walk the wheel
>
> John,I see yo’re a master at describing this kind of thing, Why not have a
> chapter in the FAQ on important skills, as we have in idling?
>
> I personally would vey much like to see a good description of how to learn to
> glide. Can anyone write this or has it been written and I missed it? I am,
> unfortunately, an eternal beginning glider…

We have descriptions on how to do a variety of skills available on the
unicycling home page. I’ve kept them out of the FAQ to avoid FAQ bloat.

Having said this, I’m always looking for training information on more skills.
Gliding, is one that we lack, and I would be glad for a skill file on this. We
can also use files for coasting, hand wheel walk, and side ride.

Beirne


Beirne “Bern” Konarski | Unicycling Web Page: bkonarsk@mcs.kent.edu |
http://www.unicycling.org Kent State University | “Untouched by Scandal” |

Re: walking the wheel

jhalpern@super.win.or.jp (Jack Halpern) wrote:
>John Foss wrote:
>|>
>|> STEP ONE: Don’t try to go fast. If you try to go the same speed you go
when
>|> pedaling, you’ll be disappointed. You just can’t comfortably walk the
wheel
>
>John,I see yo’re a master at describing this kind of thing, Why not have a
>chapter in the FAQ on important skills, as we have in idling?
>
>I personally would vey much like to see a good description of how to learn to
>glide. Can anyone write this or has it been written and I missed it? I am,
>unfortunately, an eternal beginning glider…

Me too! I sure would like to glide down some of those nasty hills I ride. It’s
Always downhill and uphill both ways! I just can’t seem to get any better at it.
maybe I don’t practice it enough.

Eric

Re: walking the wheel

jhalpern@super.win.or.jp (Jack Halpern) wrote:
>John Foss wrote:
>|>
>|> STEP ONE: Don’t try to go fast. If you try to go the same speed you go
when
>|> pedaling, you’ll be disappointed. You just can’t comfortably walk the
wheel
>
>John,I see yo’re a master at describing this kind of thing, Why not have a
>chapter in the FAQ on important skills, as we have in idling?
>
>I personally would vey much like to see a good description of how to learn to
>glide. Can anyone write this or has it been written and I missed it? I am,
>unfortunately, an eternal beginning glider…

Me too! I sure would like to glide down some of those nasty hills I ride. It’s
Always downhill and uphill both ways! I just can’t seem to get any better at it.
maybe I don’t practice it enough.

Eric

Re: walking the wheel

Sometimes I don’t know whether I’m coming or going:

After, reading John’s description, I realize now that my previous description of
wheel walking strokes is backwards. However, it does accurately describe
backward wheel walking. Just reverse the motions to get the description of
FORWARD wheel walking.

I’m sorry about any confusion this may have caused.

On One Wheel,

Ken Fuchs <kfuchs@winternet.com