walk the wheel of fortune

Hello!

I’m currently learning wheel walking (not doing too bad, up to 12 solo steps
now…) and I have also tried it backwards (while hanging onto things on either
side of me). I was wondering if it is beneficial to learn backwards at the same
time as learning it forwards.

That’s not how I learned regular riding; I learned to ride forward, then
backward. But sometimes I wonder if it would be good to learn them
simultaneously. Or maybe it doesn’t really matter!

And when you are going backwards, do you turn your foot (toe in) so you can
scoot the wheel as far back as possible?

Is it possible to get so comfortable with wheel walking that it’s easier than
riding? Has anyone ever learned wheel walking FIRST? It doesn’t seem to me that
being able to ride is an absolute necessity to being able to wheel walk, but I
could be wrong. :slight_smile:

I was reading in the Complete Book of Unicycling (which I now have two copies
of, by the way. Thanks, but no one else needs to donate theirs!) all about the
many variations - forwards, backwards, split wheel walking, side wheel
walking, idling, split idling (maybe?) and seat-in-front or seat-in-back wheel
walking. Scary! All those skills look fun and exciting to learn. I was also
amazed with the “Feats and Records” part of the book. For instance, in 1982
(back when I was a toddler =Þ ), John Foss held the record for fastest 10-yd.
wheel walk with 3.77 seconds… WOW. And Sem Abrahams had the slowest, with
42 seconds! I didn’t know there could even be that much variation in the speed
of wheel walking!

Thanks for any tips,

Tammy :slight_smile: Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

RE: walk the wheel of fortune

> And when you are going backwards, do you turn your foot (toe
> in) so you can scoot the wheel as far back as possible?

I do, but maybe not like you think. I still go heel-toe with each foot (just
like I go toe-heel when going forward), but the heel can turn outward as your
foot comes up near the fork.

> Is it possible to get so comfortable with wheel walking that it’s easier
> than riding?

I highly doubt it. Wheel walking is far less efficient that turning the pedals.
Plus your seat position is set for leg extention to the pedals, making your legs
bent up too much when walking (unless you raise your seat a lot). This is
especially true with backward wheel walking, as you have very little leverage or
tire traction when going in that direction.

> Has anyone ever learned wheel walking FIRST? It doesn’t seem to me that being
> able to ride is an absolute necessity to being

Because wheel walking is so slow and relatively uncontrolled (unlike regular
riding where you feet stay in constant contact with the pedals), it would be
quite a bit harder to learn wheel walking without pedaling first. Maybe if you
couldn’t afford crank arms and pedals…

> toddler =Þ ), John Foss held the record for fastest 10-yd. wheel walk with
> 3.77 seconds… WOW. And Sem Abrahams had the slowest, with 42 seconds! I
> didn’t know there could even be that much variation in the speed of wheel
> walking!

Actually, Sem’s record was for the Slow race, which is regular riding (if you
can call it that). Times in the 3 second range were the reason for making the
Wheel Walk race 30 meters instead of 10. In the early days of wheel walk racing
(first done in 1979?), even 10 yds was an endurance race. Many riders won by
going real slow, but making it all the way to the finish line. But people got
better, just as they have with coasting in recent years. In 1986 at UNICON II,
we initially tried 50 meters, but that’s a long way to wheel walk, especially if
you’re going fast!

Stay on top,

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone, still disappointed about losing wheel walking
supremacy to Kato… http://www.unicycling.com

RE: walk the wheel of fortune

> > with 3.77 seconds… WOW.
>
> Wow, John, you old foggie!.. :wink:

Yeah. That was fifteen years ago!

jf

Re: walk the wheel of fortune

Tammy,

> I’m currently learning wheel walking (not doing too bad, up to 12 solo steps
> now…) and I have also tried it backwards (while hanging onto things on
> either side of me). I was wondering if it is beneficial to learn backwards at
> the same time as learning it forwards.

Go for it! it really impresses the Bmx posers… At a convention recently I did
a 15m WW backwards on stage without any practice. I was so chuffed, I didn’t
fall and even recovered my feet at the end! I haven’t found it to any advantage
riding backwards to my riding forwards. What I have found is that one footed it
a lot easier than 2 footed though.

> And when you are going backwards, do you turn your foot (toe in) so you can
> scoot the wheel as far back as possible?

I roll my foot from heal to toe so I end up with toe in because my foot rolls
from heal to toe.

> Records" part of the book. For instance, in 1982 (back when I was a toddler =Þ
> ), John Foss held the record for fastest 10-yd. wheel walk with 3.77
> seconds… WOW.

Wow, John, you old foggie!.. :wink:

Have fun

Roger

Re: walk the wheel of fortune

Hi,

No advice from me on wheel walking, I’m afraid, but I was just wondering who
publishes the Complete Book of Unicycling, and how to get it.

Thanks,

Kris.

At 12:58 PM 3/11/99 PST, you wrote:
>Hello!
>
>I’m currently learning wheel walking (not doing too bad, up to 12 solo steps
>now…) and I have also tried it backwards (while hanging onto things on either
>side of me). I was wondering if it is beneficial to learn backwards at the same
>time as learning it forwards.
>
>That’s not how I learned regular riding; I learned to ride forward, then
>backward. But sometimes I wonder if it would be good to learn them
>simultaneously. Or maybe it doesn’t really matter!
>
>And when you are going backwards, do you turn your foot (toe in) so you can
>scoot the wheel as far back as possible?
>
>Is it possible to get so comfortable with wheel walking that it’s easier than
>riding? Has anyone ever learned wheel walking FIRST? It doesn’t seem to me that
>being able to ride is an absolute necessity to being able to wheel walk, but I
>could be wrong.
>
>I was reading in the Complete Book of Unicycling (which I now have two copies
>of, by the way. Thanks, but no one else needs to donate theirs!) all about the
>many variations - forwards, backwards, split wheel walking, side wheel
>walking, idling, split idling (maybe?) and seat-in-front or seat-in-back wheel
>walking. Scary! All those skills look fun and exciting to learn. I was also
>amazed with the “Feats and Records” part of the book. For instance, in 1982
>(back when I was a toddler =Þ ), John Foss held the record for fastest 10-yd.
>wheel walk with 3.77 seconds… WOW. And Sem Abrahams had the slowest, with
>42 seconds! I didn’t know there could even be that much variation in the speed
>of wheel walking!
>
>Thanks for any tips,
>
>Tammy Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>


Kris Holm, B.Sc. Geologist, Forestry Group, EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd.
Suite 550, Sun Life Plaza, 1100 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6E 4A6
Tel:(604) 685-0275 Fax:(604) 684-6241 Email: kholm@eba.ca