viscount seats, bumpers and customisation.

the girrafe sized thread got me thinking…

has any body made decent replacement bumpers for their viscount seat?

we all know that the original bumpers fall of as soon as they look at the ground.

i’ve had to repace all the screws allready because the threads get stripped from the screws which makes them rattle about loose and in more danger of actualy breaking off.

this is especialy bad on my girrafe.

i’ve been thinking about some kind of metal bumper to protect the rear of my viscount seat ( the front end is protected by a reeder handle ) ever since i got the reeder handle.

ideas so far:

a bit of steel “L” section whacked with a hammer till it fits.
pitfalls: scrapes gym floors
solutions: lots of finishing, thick rubbery paint.
good points: easy to make, rock solid

a bit of rubber from a car tyre.
pitfalls: may not be the right shape, may leave trousers black
solutions: try lots of diferent tyres, coat with flexible paint/laquer
good points: cheap to make , bouncy

copy the design from the metal loops that some dm seats have.
pitfalls: may involve learning to weld and buying a welder and finding somewhere to do welding.
solution: find someone with the abouve skills/facilities, who is indebted to me in some way
good points: nice and shiny when chromed

my other criteria is that it looks nice. which may rule out the rubber bumpers.

everyones feedback will be apreciated.(if i’m reinventg the wheel i’d like to know, or equally if someone else already found out the square wheels don’t work very well)

i see a project coming upon me…(mental imagery of making bumpers in a frankenstien type laboratory in the middle of a storm and trying to bring them to life with lightning)

if the end result is any good and based on an original design maybee i’ll start making “UMX bumpers” so i can be up there with the patrons of the KH frame, the pozantner hub and the reeder handle.

UMX aka ewancycle

citizen_smith@hotmailOBSCURED.com
(your know the deal, there isn’t realy a domain called
hotmailOBSCURED.com)

citizen_smith@hotmailOBSCURED.com wrote in message news:<a4f9pg$hrt$1@paris.btinternet.com>…
<snip>
> i’ve been thinking about some kind of metal bumper to protect the rear of my viscount seat ( the front end is protected by a reeder handle ) ever since i got the reeder handle.
>
> ideas so far:
>
> a bit of steel “L” section whacked with a hammer till it fits.
> pitfalls: scrapes gym floors
> solutions: lots of finishing, thick rubbery paint.
> good points: easy to make, rock solid

Maybe a bit of L section aluminium instead? It would be a lot easier
to hammer in to shape and round off the corners on, is slightly less
likely to damage floors but may not last as long as steel. But then
again, it will probably be better matched strength-wise to the seat
itself, if you go for steel you may find that in a year or so all you
have left is your home made bumper, aluminium is more likely to “fall
apart” at a similar rate to the saddle.

> a bit of rubber from a car tyre.
> pitfalls: may not be the right shape, may leave trousers black
> solutions: try lots of diferent tyres, coat with flexible paint/laquer
> good points: cheap to make , bouncy

Car inner tubes may be a better, or at least cleaner, solution. Get an
old one from you local tyre fitters, they occasionally have old ones
they throw out. They have them less often now than in the past, thanks
to tubeless tyres. I used to get punctured tractor inner tubes from a
more rural tyre fitter, so maybe they’re a better bet (they’re great
for floating down rivers on). You could cut them up and laminate these
into the shape and thickness you want by using a decent contact
adhesive (e.g. Evostick in the UK)

Have fun!

Graeme
(above email is defunct, try graemeATgpdodsDOTcom, anti-spam address,
you know what to do!)

You could pull molds of the original bumpers, and cast them in aluminium. Cheep (alginate or silicon molds, wax, invest, centripital cast- or better yet, sand casting… ya, sand casting makes much more sence).

I’m working on getting a precision tubing bender- it’s reletively cheep (less $200) and allows for working over a template- but has some minimal diameter restrictions for larger tubing. Unless you are willing to put some holes in the seat, you are going to be dealing with those shallow bolt brackets. For this reason (and to provide a gripping serface) I would recommend a continuose loop, not L shapes. I stoped by my metal supplier 2 weeks ago- only to find they have gone out of buisness! If anybody has recommendations for tubing on-line, I’d love to hear it.

With several new MUni seats in developement, I’m a bit hesitant to invest in producing retro fit bumpers for the Viscount- bumpers that would cost more than the seat… still…

Christopher

alternative

Moving away a bit from your origional idea, when my bumpers fell off, i just strapped them back on with a load of electrical tape. If you do this neatly, it can look good, and if you choose a colour to match your seat (black in my case) it blends in well as the electrical tape tends to bond together to form s kind of large single piece, if you know what i mean. However, after repeated falls, the tape did wear through, so i moved on to Duct (Duck?) tape, actually, Power Duck tape, which is thicker and very strong. Having used this, my bumbers are ultra secure and i’m yet to have them fall off.
Another way of fastening bumpers which was suggested to me was to replace the little black screws supplied with the seat with wider ones so they cut a new wider thread. I’m not sure how secure this is, but it leaves your seat looking pretty much as new
Hope this helps

Ando

Ando wrote

^snip^
Another way of
> fastening bumpers which was suggested to me was to replace the little
> black screws supplied with the seat with wider ones so they cut a new
> wider thread. I’m not sure how secure this is, but it leaves your seat
> looking pretty much as new
^snip^

I have done this on the viscount seats on both my unis, and on the uni of a
little kid who lives on my street. Since then none have the bumpers have
come loose on any of the saddles, not even a bit. And the repairs were done
6 months ago. Before then they were falling off every day, locktite had
completly failed to help. I had even tried gluing the bumpers on with epoxy.
It was also the cheapest repair/upgrade I have ever done. Costing about one
pound for a small bag of suitable self tapping screws.

Anyone who has ever seen me unicycle will know that I drop my machines a
lot, usually on hard surfaces. So the method seems excellent. Why Viscount
are not using larger screws is beyond me.

If you have a viscount seat do it now!

On the subject of saddles, I really really want to get a miyata for when I
am healed up enough to ride again, Roger?

David Straitjacket
www.straitjacketcircus.co.uk

I have brought up the problem with the screws with Viscount, the problem I
believe is not the size of the screws but that they are soft and they just
totally loose their thread when they are used. Self tapping screws should
be hardened. The response from Viscount was that they would look at it; no
promises.

On the matter of Miyata Saddles, I hope to have them in stock for BJC
(Easter) in all the colours.

A good solution for the bumpers is to stick them on with silicon sealant and
replace the screws. The silicon does 2 things it sticks the bumper on and
fills the gap under the flange so it is soft on your fingers. :slight_smile:

Roger


The UK’s Unicycle Source
http://www.unicycle.uk.com


“David Straitjacket” <straitjacketcircus@'DELETETHIS’totalise.co.uk> wrote
in message news:u6r2m77727p772@corp.supernews.com
> Ando wrote
>
> ^snip^
> Another way of
> > fastening bumpers which was suggested to me was to replace the little
> > black screws supplied with the seat with wider ones so they cut a new
> > wider thread. I’m not sure how secure this is, but it leaves your seat
> > looking pretty much as new
> ^snip^
>
> I have done this on the viscount seats on both my unis, and on the uni of
a
> little kid who lives on my street. Since then none have the bumpers have
> come loose on any of the saddles, not even a bit. And the repairs were
done
> 6 months ago. Before then they were falling off every day, locktite had
> completly failed to help. I had even tried gluing the bumpers on with
epoxy.
> It was also the cheapest repair/upgrade I have ever done. Costing about
one
> pound for a small bag of suitable self tapping screws.
>
> Anyone who has ever seen me unicycle will know that I drop my machines a
> lot, usually on hard surfaces. So the method seems excellent. Why Viscount
> are not using larger screws is beyond me.
>
> If you have a viscount seat do it now!
>
> On the subject of saddles, I really really want to get a miyata for when I
> am healed up enough to ride again, Roger?
>
> David Straitjacket
> www.straitjacketcircus.co.uk
>

Colours? Is this the Miyata version of the Henry Ford line - you can have any colour you like so long as it’s VVG (Vile Vomit Green)?

Is this some cruel joke? Will we see you duck behind the desk when stocks get low with a pot of Humbrol enamel paint? Or can you pull off the miraculous again and produce a red Miyata seat to go with my new frame?

The technique I use to keep my Viscount bumpers on is such:
The first day the bumpers fell off, I removed the screws, got a hiking boot shoelace (long) and just laced it through the bumper hole, then through the eyelet on the seat frame, then through the other hole, then wrapped around seatpost, then through the other holes, wrapped around seatpost some more… etc until the length of the lace was exhausted. I never have had to untie and retie the laces… just a small twisting is needed maybe once a month. And the bumpers stay nicely in place. If anybody would like a picture of this, it is a possibility.