unis in rain and umbrellas

I have a couple of unrelated questions about using a uni for around-campus
transportation. First, what do you use for a lock? Is there something you can
attach to the uni that won’t get in the way but still will be solid enough to
lock it? Do you just lock through the wheel?


One of the great things about unicycles is you don’t have to lock them up, just
cart them around with you. When I rode around campus I used to just bring it
with me inside, wherever I was going. It would fit nicely in a corner or under a
desk somewhere and I was only asked to remove it once in 3 years.


Second, how do unis do in the rain? Can a novice-to-intermediate rider
reasonably hold an umbrella while riding? Do you have problems with water coming
up off the wheel fast enough to dirty your back? How wet do your feet get?


Unis do fine in the wet except in mud or on grass. I just about always use an
umbrella though it gets correspondingly harder with wind. If its blowing a real
gale I find my arms get more of a work out than my legs! Novice / intermediate
people shouldn’t have to many problems. Try riding with your arms behind your
back or crossed to see if you have the balance necessary to occupy your hands
with something else.

If its not too windy an umbrella is a great way of turning your unicycle into a
convertable, expect a few more wierd looks though. Puddles are to be avoided if
possible. I haven’t noticed my back getting dirty but I have got damp trouser
legs in the past from splashing through puddles.

o o Peter Bier o O o Juggler, unicyclist and mathematician.
o/|\o peter_bier@usa.net


Get free email and a permanent address at http://www.netaddress.com/?N=1

Re: unis in rain and umbrellas

Hi!

I ride my 20" uni around campus, and I don’t lock it up - I just bring it into
the classroom and put it in the corner. (Or, if there’s a coat rack, i hang it!)

my sister rides her uni to the high school and locks it up in the bike rack,
thru the tire. If you have a speedometer on it, i would take the computer part
off so someone doesn’t snatch it.

tammy

>I have a couple of unrelated questions about using a uni for around-campus
>transportation. First, what do you use for a lock? Is there something you can
>attach to the uni that won’t get in the way but still will be solid enough to
>lock it? Do you just lock through the wheel?
>
>*******************
>One of the great things about unicycles is you don’t have to lock them up, just
>cart them around with you. When I rode around campus I used to just bring it
>with me inside, wherever I was going. It would fit nicely in a corner or under
>a desk somewhere and I was only asked to remove it once in 3 years.
>*******************
>
>
>Second, how do unis do in the rain? Can a novice-to-intermediate rider
>reasonably hold an umbrella while riding? Do you have problems with water
>coming up off the wheel fast enough to dirty your back? How wet do your
>feet get?
>
>*******************
>
>Unis do fine in the wet except in mud or on grass. I just about always use an
>umbrella though it gets correspondingly harder with wind. If its blowing a real
>gale I find my arms get more of a work out than my legs! Novice / intermediate
>people shouldn’t have to many problems. Try riding with your arms behind your
>back or crossed to see if you have the balance necessary to occupy your hands
>with something else.
>
>If its not too windy an umbrella is a great way of turning your unicycle into a
>convertable, expect a few more wierd looks though. Puddles are to be avoided if
>possible. I haven’t noticed my back getting dirty but I have got damp trouser
>legs in the past from splashing through puddles.
>
>
> o o Peter Bier o O o Juggler, unicyclist and mathematician.
>o/|\o peter_bier@usa.net
>
>____________________________________________________________________
>Get free email and a permanent address at http://www.netaddress.com/?N=1


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