Unicycling without the tricks?

Hi group,

After months of reading the news group and helping my daughter to learn riding,
I am now considering to take the jump as well and learn unicycling myself. (As
someone here stated: It’s not fair if she has all the fun.)

Question: It seems that all of you unicyclists take it as a challenge to learn
ever more tricks, err, skills. (Apologies for the subject line.) But are there
also riders who are satisfied if they can just ride a unicycle the way most
people use their bicycles recreationally,
i.e. freemounting, riding, perhaps idling but not much more? Or is it that once
the virus infects you, you’re never done? I asked Jorga (my 11 y.o.), and
she said she wants to learn everything she can.

Klaas

This message was created with 100% recycled electrons.

RE: Unicycling without the tricks?

> Question: It seems that all of you unicyclists take it as a challenge to learn
> ever more tricks, err, skills. (Apologies for the subject line.) But are there
> also riders who are satisfied if they can just ride a unicycle the way most
> people use their bicycles recreationally,
> i.e. freemounting, riding, perhaps idling but not much more? Or is it that
> once the virus infects you, you’re never done? I asked Jorga (my 11
> y.o.), and she said she wants to learn everything she can.

I learned everything I could for several years, but then, combined possibly with
my loss of an indoor practice space, switched my interest over to trails. I
don’t do much with tricks now, though I still do the occasional show, and help
people learn the stuff when I have the opportunity.

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

“I thought it was Memorial week!” - Austin Miller, 8, on being told he had to
get up for school on the Tuesday after Memorial Day

RE: Unicycling without the tricks?

> So, after three hours he can freemount(I am a reaaaalllllyyy good teacher!!!
> :-))) ) but cannot ride… Is he normal??

No. That’s what makes him a good candidate for unicycling.

Too bad you were in the middle of nowhere when you were teaching him, or he
could have used a wall or something to lean on! :slight_smile:

Three hours is very good. Some people will be quick to point out it took them a
lot longer to learn to ride (including me), so just keep at it (and don’t worry
so much about the mount).

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

“I thought it was Memorial week!” - Austin Miller, 8, on being told he had to
get up for school on the Tuesday after Memorial Day

Re: Unicycling without the tricks?

Keep in mind that this news group is a self selected group made up of (mostly)
motivated unicyclists. The unmotivated unicyclists don’t bother to participate.

For 15 years I was happy just riding around and never learned any tricks beyond
basic idling. Then three years ago I got a Pashley MUni and I caught the
unicycling bug again. I started practicing again. I started reading this news
group. And I started learning new skills that would help me muni better. My
motivation now for learning new skills now is to improve my muni riding.

The problem with just learning to ride and then not working on improving skills
is that unicycling may become less interesting as time goes on. For most of the
15 years when I was just riding and not working on developing skills my
unicycles spent a lot of time in the closet due to loss of interest.

The challenge is to keep some variety so unicycling stays interesting. If all
you plan on doing is learning to ride around and not learn any tricks then you
should consider getting some larger wheel unicycles like a 28 inch and/or a 36
inch Coker so you don’t get bored just riding a 24 inch uni around. A 28" or a
Coker is loads of fun and you don’t need to do any tricks to have fun with them.

john_childs

From: (Klaas Bil)
>Hi group,
>
>After months of reading the news group and helping my daughter to learn riding,
>I am now considering to take the jump as well and learn unicycling myself. (As
>someone here stated: It’s not fair if she has all the fun.)
>
>Question: It seems that all of you unicyclists take it as a challenge to learn
>ever more tricks, err, skills. (Apologies for the subject line.) But are there
>also riders who are satisfied if they can just ride a unicycle the way most
>people use their bicycles recreationally,
>i.e. freemounting, riding, perhaps idling but not much more? Or is it that once
> the virus infects you, you’re never done? I asked Jorga (my 11 y.o.), and
> she said she wants to learn everything she can.
>
>Klaas
>
>This message was created with 100% recycled electrons.


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RE: Unicycling without the tricks?

> My kids have Technicolor legs most of the time.

That sounds like something that could be made into a movie. “The Tale of the
Technicolor Legs” or something. It’s certainly true, peaking around convention
time for the people who go to them.

And for those of you who are thinking “gross”, I’m sure there isn’t a parent out
there who would rather see their kid with perfect legs but not such an excellent
activity to be involved in, one that workes the body as well as the mind, and
gives riders like the members of Panther Pride the opportunity to travel and
meet people from around the country and world.

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

Re: Unicycling without the tricks?

Hi Klaas.

As a kid, I could only ride my unicycle. I couldn’t even freemount, which was
embarassing if there wasn’t a prop nearby. But I delivered a lot of newspapers
on one wheel.

I took up the sport again as an adult (25 years later), intending only to ride
for fitness. Then I met John Foss, and he made the skills look so easy. I soon
learned to freemount, idle and hop. Then I met Dustin Kelm, who makes unicycling
skills look as easy as breathing. I learned to ride with the seat out front,
seat out back, ride backwards, wheel-walk, and now I’m learning to ride an
ultimate wheel (built by the legend himself, Tom Miller.)

I had not planned to gain any of these skills, but once I saw others performing
them, I was challenged. I still am. By the time I reach skill level 10, there
will probably be a level 15.

My recommendation: just do it. You’re likely to enjoy a second
childhood, as I am.

Best regards, John Drummond

----- Original Message ----- From: Klaas Bil
<klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl> To: <unicycling@winternet.com> Sent:
Wednesday, June 21, 2000 6:28 PM Subject: Unicycling without the tricks?

> Hi group,
>
> After months of reading the news group and helping my daughter to learn
> riding, I am now considering to take the jump as well and learn unicycling
> myself. (As someone here stated: It’s not fair if she has all the fun.)
>
> Question: It seems that all of you unicyclists take it as a challenge to learn
> ever more tricks, err, skills. (Apologies for the subject line.) But are there
> also riders who are satisfied if they can just ride a unicycle the way most
> people use their bicycles recreationally,
> i.e. freemounting, riding, perhaps idling but not much more? Or is it that
> once the virus infects you, you’re never done? I asked Jorga (my 11
> y.o.), and she said she wants to learn everything she can.
>
> Klaas
>
> This message was created with 100% recycled electrons.

Re: Unicycling without the tricks?

I find that the skills listed in the skill levels help me to get comfortable
enough with the unicycle that I can attempt some things I wouldn’t have done if
I had stuck with just riding forward and a standard mount. There is a long path
ahead if I want to accomplish the skills I have as goals (like free mounting a
giraffe unicycle). Even so, just basic skills that I’ve picked up following the
level 1-5 skill level list have helped build my confidence a lot. The first time
I tried to ride with my stomach on the seat, I thought, “Who is the sadistic SOB
who thought this up?” Now I actually enjoy it and do it for laughs (my wife says
I look like a turtle). Basic skills like riding with the seat on the stomach and
bouncing are great intros to more advanced basic skills like riding with the
seat out in front, etc. The long and short is that learning new skills allows me
to do the things I really want to do on a unicycle, like riding on trails and
over rocks.

Whatever you do, riding is a lot of fun, and learning new skills is a kick in
the butt (sometimes, literally). I hope you do join your daughter when she
unicycles. Enjoy!

Carl Trachte Morenci, Arizona

Klaas Bil wrote:
>
> Hi group,
>
> After months of reading the news group and helping my daughter to learn
> riding, I am now considering to take the jump as well and learn unicycling
> myself. (As someone here stated: It’s not fair if she has all the fun.)
>
> Question: It seems that all of you unicyclists take it as a challenge to learn
> ever more tricks, err, skills. (Apologies for the subject line.) But are there
> also riders who are satisfied if they can just ride a unicycle the way most
> people use their bicycles recreationally,
> i.e. freemounting, riding, perhaps idling but not much more? Or is it that
> once the virus infects you, you’re never done? I asked Jorga (my 11
> y.o.), and she said she wants to learn everything she can.
>
> Klaas
>
> This message was created with 100% recycled electrons.

Re: Unicycling without the tricks?

Klaas Bil <klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl> wrote:
: But are there also riders who are satisfied if they can just ride a unicycle
: the way most people use their bicycles recreationally,
: i.e. freemounting, riding, perhaps idling but not much more? Or is it that
: once the virus infects you, you’re never done? I asked Jorga (my 11
: y.o.), and she said she wants to learn everything she can.

Most of the riding I do is instead of a two wheeler, commuting or riding for
fun, going places and seeing things. Muni is just an extension of that for me, I
wanted to ride on the moors to see them close up, I didn’t have a mountain bike
so I rode my uni.

Plenty of peole ride like that, a number of them came to the british muni
weekend ( it doesn’t have to be hard stuff). I think every one finds their own
satisfaction from riding, some enjoy the challenge of trcks others enjoy the
scenery. I hope you find you enjoy riding too.

sarah

Re: Unicycling without the tricks?

Hi!

> > So, after three hours he can freemount(I am a reaaaalllllyyy good teacher!!!
> > :-))) ) but cannot ride… Is he normal??
> No. That’s what makes him a good candidate for unicycling.

That’s what I thought too! :slight_smile:

> Too bad you were in the middle of nowhere when you were teaching him, or he
> could have used a wall or something to lean on! :slight_smile:

Well it seems he didn’t want to lean on anything, since it didn’t look like real
unicycling!! He still needed to lean, first on a wall and on my shoulder, then
on my shoulder, and last time my wrist was almost sufficient…

> Three hours is very good.

Yep, I could myself take it as a stroke in my pride(I needed almost two weeks,
one or two hours every day, before being able to freemount, and ride reliably
for 4 km… And my freemount skill needed almost these two weeks to appear…)

> Some people will be quick to point out it took them a lot longer to learn to
> ride (including me), so just keep at it
I would indeed be glad to count him as my first student! Unfortunately, we
mostly see each other at work, and that is not a very good moment to spent much
time unicycling… sadly!

>(and don’t worry so much about the mount).

:slight_smile: well, it’s certainly something I wouldn’t worry about… just
wondering! (a lot of people say they have a problem freemounting and I just
wanted to share the only two experiences I have, myself and my friend,
respectively 2 weeks and 3 hours…)

I will definitely have to learn more skills fast to keep ahead of him!!!

> John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone


Internet et la telephonie mobile ne sont que de la telepathie sans cerveau!

Boris Bret Philips Research Laboratories bret@ens.fr +31 40 27 42 453

Re: Unicycling without the tricks?

I am involved with at large number of kids, ages 5-15 that unicycle. This year
we performed with 75 out of 100. During the school year we do half-time shows,
school exhibitions and a few parades. The half-time shows usually are 7-15 mins
long. We have several small groups of kids that do different routines. The last
all the kids do. Exhibitions, several groups and well as individuals perform in
about a 45 min show. Of these 100 kids, some are just learning, some are just
happy riding at practice around the gym in circles. Then you have the others who
have discovered the different skills and styles of unicycles. After the first
few times of riding the unicycles outside on the grass(beginning MUNI) we lost
about 6 kids. It was too hard or harder then they wanted to give the effort too.
But we sparked an interest in a few other kids that gave them a whole other side
of unicycling to explore. Just as most other things, you get what you put into
it. If you are happy and content with no tricks, that may just be your style.
Tricks do take time, effort and some physical challenges. My kids have
Technicolor legs most of the time. Check out the new video from the Twin Cities
Club and you will get a whole different idea about “tricks”.

Barb K.

Re: Unicycling without the tricks?

Sarah Miller wrote:

> Plenty of peole ride like that, a number of them came to the british muni
> weekend ( it doesn’t have to be hard stuff).

I’ve just bought myself a Muni, so assuming I do get to the point where I can
stay on the thing (after a few evenings have now progressed to the point where I
can do a complete forward revolution, Wowsa!) I’d be interested in the above
event: do you have details/pointers please?

Ta, Pete (falling off, but having fun).

Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics,
Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net
p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/

Re: Unicycling without the tricks?

Peter,

We have the British Unicycle Convention before the next Muni weekend. There will
be Muni at this event. It is in North Wales again this year. See:
http://web.onyxnet.co.uk/Roger.Davies-octacon.co.uk/buc7.htm

Roger

 The UK's Unicycle Source <a href="http://www.unicycle.uk.com/">http://www.unicycle.uk.com/</a>

----- Original Message ----- From: “Peter Clinch” <p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk> To:
<unicycling@winternet.com> Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2000 1:19 PM Subject: Re:
Unicycling without the tricks?

> Sarah Miller wrote:
>
> > Plenty of peole ride like that, a number of them came to the british
muni
> > weekend ( it doesn’t have to be hard stuff).
>
> I’ve just bought myself a Muni, so assuming I do get to the point where I can
> stay on the thing (after a few evenings have now progressed to the point where
> I can do a complete forward revolution, Wowsa!) I’d be interested in the above
> event: do you have details/pointers please?
>
> Ta, Pete (falling off, but having fun).
> –
> Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical
> Physics, Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net
> p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/