Unicycling terminology, Unicycling Dictionary

Tim Sheppard wrote:
|>
|> >I don’t have the time to deal with the terminology problems in full now, but
|> >I submit a tentative list of terms for evaluation and critiscism. ADDITIONS,
|> >as well as SYNONYMS, are particularly welcome.
|>
|> Hover is a synonym for rock and idle, in common usage in the UK. In fact I’d
|> never heard the term idle until talking to Americans.

I am VERY grateful for the information, and encourage everyone to send in
their comments, criticisms, additions and synonyms for the list of unicycle
terms I posted.

One day, when we have our headquarters in Geneva and IUF excutives have personal
helicopters :-), we will have a Multilingual Dictionary of Unicycling
Terminology in English, Spanish, German, French, Chinese, Japanese and
eventually other languages like Hebrew and, for the heck of it, Yiddish.

WHO will volunteer to be my assistant editors and lexicographers? Fortunately, I
am a lexciographer by profession; unfortunately, my dictonary-making skills are
on a higher level than my unicycling skills :-). So I am in a position to do the
job but need help.

So here is a tentative poropsal for the Compilation Team.

     MULTILINGUAL DICTIONARY OF UNICYCLING TERMINOLOGY
  1. Editor in Chief Jack Halpern
  2. Japanese Editor Jack Halpern
  3. Chinese Editor Li Zhao
  4. Chinese Assistant Editor Jack Halpern
  5. Spanish Editor Alberto Ruiz
  6. Spanish Assitant Editors Boni & Caroli
  7. German Editor Michael Kirsh
  8. German Assistant Editor Rolf Sander
  9. Hebrew Editor Jack Halpern
  10. Yiddish Editor Jack Halpern
  11. English Editor John Foss
  12. English Assistant Editor Jack Halpern
  13. English Consultants Craig Rogers, Ken Fuchs,Tim Sheppard
  14. French Editor Normand Beaumont

So I say let’s get a team together. Anybody can be a consultant and you don’t
have to do much. Just make comments, additions or whatever, and you name will
forever in the annals of unicycling history :slight_smile:

I would appreciate if the people named would respond or suggest someone
else. I see it as my mission to coordinate thois project and make this
dictionary a reality.

Stay on top, Jack Halpern IUF Vice President

Re: Unicycling terminology, Unicycling Dictionary

Jack Halpern (jhalpern@super.win.or.jp) wrote:
: Tim Sheppard wrote: [all deleted to save space]

My newsserver seems to be purging every night, so I lost everything up to this
last post, so I’m not sure if this was mentioned:

I have found within just a few 100 miles travelling in the UK, that the term
used for staying in the same place while rocking backwards and forwards with the
pedals is refured to as “Rocking” which I use, and “Hovering” used down south,
it seems to be called “idling” in this newsgroup. Is this common?

Why should there be so many different words meaning exactly the same thing.
You are affectively rocking when in that position, so I’ll stick to what I
think is right.


Damion Yates - Sheffield Uni, UK. http://www.bath.ac.uk/~exxdmy

Re: Unicycling terminology, Unicycling Dictionary

Damion Yates <seca52%teach@dcs.shef.ac.uk> wrote:

>My newsserver seems to be purging every night, so I lost everything up to this
>last post, so I’m not sure if this was mentioned:

The unicycling@winternet.com mailing list has a bi-directional gateway with
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>I have found within just a few 100 miles traveling in the UK, that the term
>used for staying in the same place while rocking backwards and forwards with
>the pedals is referred to as “Rocking” which I use, and “Hovering” used down
>south, it seems to be called “idling” in this newsgroup. Is this common?

Rocking seems to have been used in USA far more often ten or more years ago
along with idling. The term idling seems to dominate in the US, now though. I’ve
only recently heard (actually seen) “hovering” in this newsgroup. Wonder what
term the first Unicycling Book used?

>Why should there be so many different words meaning exactly the same thing.
>You are affectively rocking when in that position, so I’ll stick to what I
>think is right.

The reason is geographic and perhaps even social distance between groups of
unicyclists?

You’re right. Rocking does seem to be the most accurate description of the three
(hovering, idling and rocking).

Sincerely,

Ken Fuchs <kfuchs@winternet.com

Re: Unicycling terminology, Unicycling Dictionary (fwd)

FORWARDED MAIL ------- From: kfuchs@winternet.com (Ken Fuchs) Date: 13 Aug 95
Originally To: tim@lilliput-p.win-uk.net

Hi Tim,

You sent me the following message as private email. Do also intend to send it to
the unicycling mailing list?

<Yes I did, so …here you are List, check this out. - Tim>

>>You’re right. Rocking does seem to be the most accurate description of the
>>three (hovering, idling and rocking).
>>
>>Sincerely,
>>
>>Ken Fuchs <kfuchs@winternet.com>
>
>I prefer hovering myself. It expresses the frantic activity of remaining in one
>place, eg. like a hummingbird. Idling expresses the lack of effort to stay in
>one place - not something I’ve noticed in practice!
>
>However I do accept that idling seems to be the prevalent term, and I’m not
>suggesting changing it. I also agree that for official and international
>purposes especially, there should be one accepted standard term.

One hovers the first few years. Then after things become quite a bit easier,
one rocks for a few years. Next things become so easy, one idles the rest of
his life. :slight_smile:

Sincerely,

Ken.

P.S. Feel free to post the above comments.

========================================================
Tim Sheppard tim@lilliput-p.win-uk.net Lilliput Press - Publisher of fine books
in miniature

Re: Unicycling terminology, Unicycling Dictionary

jhalpern@super.win.or.jp (Jack Halpern) wrote:

> As I understand it, “idle” is the standard and most widespread term. “Rock” is
> a synonym used mostly in the US, I think. “Hover” I only heard of yesterday
> from Tim Sheppard. I never heard anyone actually use it in my many years of
> active unicycling.
I would say that “hover” is the commonest term in the UK (yup, I’m towards
the South).
>
> Uniform terminology is important to ensure good communications. We should
> definitely stik to IDLE as the standard term, in my opinion.

Why? All the terms you mention are pretty obvious in meaning given the context
of unicycling… I think people should be allowed to express themselves as they
see fit, so long as they realise that obscure and local terminology will need
explanation before use. There is also the precedent on the net that both US and
UK spellings and variants are quite acceptable…

Mark

[ markt@harlequin.co.uk | http://www.harlequin.co.uk/ | +44 1223 873829 ]