Unicycling by head torch

I am just back from a ride on my Muni using a head torch to light my way.
I was riding through some woodland, nothing too severe, but small bumps in
the dark are a bit different copaired to normal daylight. With the trees
loosing their leaves, the trail was hard to follow as well. I have done
night time Mountain biking before, but this was quite different, on a
mountain bike, you can just ride over the small bumps you don’t notice,
but on a unicycle those bumps can really be a surprise. It’s good to go
over the trails that you ride in daylight, and see the difference.

Innes Dunbar

Funny you should mention that. We went out for a night ride last week
and decided just to bring a simple headlamp each (our more powerful
lights needed recharging and the ride was planned on the spur of the
moment). When it got dark, we powered on the headlamps and it was
pathetic! These lamps use 4 AA batteries and work fine for hiking and
climbing, in fact I bought it for my trip to Mexico and climbed 5 hours
with it on Orizaba. But for Muni this type of light is pretty useless. I
charged up my NiteRider battery today and on the ride home this evening
it was SO much better.

Yes unicycling at night is much harder, but make it easy on yourself and
invest in a good light!

—Nathan

“Innes Dunbar” <innes.dunbar@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:75f622d9.0110101311.3432396a@posting.google.com
> I am just back from a ride on my Muni using a head torch to light my
> way. I was riding through some woodland, nothing too severe, but small
> bumps in the dark are a bit different copaired to normal daylight. With
> the trees loosing their leaves, the trail was hard to follow as well. I
> have done night time Mountain biking before, but this was quite
> different, on a mountain bike, you can just ride over the small bumps
> you don’t notice, but on a unicycle those bumps can really be a
> surprise. It’s good to go over the trails that you ride in daylight, and
> see the difference.
>
> Innes Dunbar

Nathan wrote:
>We went out for a night ride last week and decided just to bring a simple
>headlamp each (our more powerful lights needed recharging

I don’t think my mind has ever been more concentrated unicycling than when
coming back from the pub off-road at BMW3. My 12 Watt floodlight was
inoperative (loose connection it turned out) and I came down a gully with
a single white LED. I was quite proud of clearing that. If I’d had my main
light working it would have been as easy as in daylight i.e. I could pick
the easy line.

Using white LEDs makes for a ride similar to just a moonlit one with a
soft blueish glow.

Leo White

I used to do a lot of night riding, clocking up 100s if not 1000s of hours
off road in the dark and I would have said that the use of “small” light
can make the ride more fun. It is harder than day time riding or the using
of a big light that turns night into day, but for me that is part of the
fun. One of the things that we used to do as a group was if one riders
lights failed we would all ride without lights using the moon to light the
way… mind this only works if there is a moon and you are not cloaked by
trees - it is amazing how much you can see once you eyes have adapted to
the lower light levels. Practice with smaller lights definitely improves
your reactions and confidence.

There’s my 2 cents worth.

Roger

                     The UK's Unicycle Source
                   <a href="http://www.unicycle.uk.com/">http://www.unicycle.uk.com/</a>

----- Original Message ----- From: “Nathan Hoover” <nathan@movaris.com>
To: <unicycling@winternet.com> Sent: Thursday, October 11, 2001 7:25 AM
Subject: Re: Unicycling by head torch

> Funny you should mention that. We went out for a night ride last week
> and decided just to bring a simple headlamp each (our more powerful
> lights needed recharging and the ride was planned on the spur of the
> moment).
When
> it got dark, we powered on the headlamps and it was pathetic! These
> lamps use 4 AA batteries and work fine for hiking and climbing, in fact
> I bought it for my trip to Mexico and climbed 5 hours with it on
> Orizaba. But for Muni this type of light is pretty useless. I charged up
> my NiteRider
battery
> today and on the ride home this evening it was SO much better.
>
> Yes unicycling at night is much harder, but make it easy on yourself and
> invest in a good light!
>
> —Nathan
>
> “Innes Dunbar” <innes.dunbar@btinternet.com> wrote in message
> news:75f622d9.0110101311.3432396a@posting.google.com
> > I am just back from a ride on my Muni using a head torch to light my
> > way. I was riding through some woodland, nothing too severe, but small
> > bumps in the dark are a bit different copaired to normal daylight.
> > With the trees loosing their leaves, the trail was hard to follow as
> > well. I have done night time Mountain biking before, but this was
> > quite different, on a mountain bike, you can just ride over the small
> > bumps you don’t notice, but on a unicycle those bumps can really be a
> > surprise. It’s good to go over the trails that you ride in daylight,
> > and see the difference.
> >
> > Innes Dunbar

As we all know, Roger is slightly mad. I was with him when he did this (in
a forest, cloaked by trees, I might add - no moon) at BMW3. My own
experiences there have prompted me to invest in some bright lights.
Perhaps when I get more confident I’ll think about joining Roger in his
madness…

Arnold the Aardvark

I was driving home over Snoqualmie Pass last weekend, and decided to
unicycle through the Snoqualmie Tunnel. I had my road wheel with me, and
no light, but what the heck.

Fortunately, the trail is hard-packed dirt without too many potholes. I
had a mini-flashlight with two rather old AA batteries. The tunnel is 2.25
miles long.

I found the darkness very disorienting. I couldn’t see the walls, and had
trouble knowing if I was going in a straight line. It was a fun
experience, but next time I’ll bring the Coker and my 12 watt headlamp.

The Snoqualmie Tunnel is part of a 22 mile rail-to-trail packed dirt &
gravel bike path that would be a cool part of next year’s national and
international unicycle meets. We could do car shuttles, and go
downhill all the way. In addition to the tunnel there are super-high
trestle bridges.

David Maxfield Bainbridge Island, WA

That trail sounds excellent. Hopefully I’ll get the chance to try it.

Maxfield D <maxfieldd@aol.com> wrote:

> The Snoqualmie Tunnel is part of a 22 mile rail-to-trail packed dirt &
> gravel bike path that would be a cool part of next year’s national and
> international unicycle meets. We could do car shuttles, and go downhill
> all the way. In addition to the tunnel there are super-high trestle
> bridges.

Cool, count me in for some of that, I’m really hoping there will be some
good social rides as part of Unicon next year, China was a bit tooo
competitive for me!

sarah

Unicycle-Meets , Hockey, Basketball, games & workshops Saturday Oct 27th
and Dec 1st Harry Cheshire High School, Habberley rd, Kidderminster
e-mail stevegrain@aol.com for details

Maxfield D <maxfieldd@aol.com> wrote:

> The Snoqualmie Tunnel is part of a 22 mile rail-to-trail packed dirt &
> gravel bike path that would be a cool part of next year’s national and
> international unicycle meets. We could do car shuttles, and go downhill
> all the way. In addition to the tunnel there are super-high trestle
> bridges.

Cool, count me in for some of that, I’m really hoping there will be some
good social rides as part of Unicon next year, China was a bit tooo
competitive for me!

sarah

Unicycle-Meets , Hockey, Basketball, games & workshops Saturday Oct 27th
and Dec 1st Harry Cheshire High School, Habberley rd, Kidderminster
e-mail stevegrain@aol.com for details

That is a great trail for a Coker ride. I took my Coker out for a ride
there two weeks ago. It’s a fun ride and my main purpose in doing the ride
that day was to scout it out for NUC/UNICON.

The trail is part of Iron Horse State Park (it’s a very long and skinny
state park <g>) and also goes by the name John Wayne Pioneer Trail. You
can take the trail all the way from North Bend (starting at Rattlesnake
Lake) to the Snoqualmie Pass summit (where the muni events were for NUC
1999). From Rattlesnake Lake to the tunnel and the summit is about 22
miles and about 1500 feet of elevation gain. The grade is no more than 2%.
I actually found it easier to ride up the hill than to ride down. The
grade is so slight that you barely notice the climb.

The tunnel is a blast. 2.25 miles, dark, cold and couples snuggling in the
dark alcoves. A good light in the tunnel is a good thing. The trestle
bridges are cool too. Saw some rock climbers on the cliffs by the trestles
too. It’s a great way to take the Coker off-road.

For those curious about the trail do a google search on “Iron Horse State
Park” and/or “John Wayne Pioneer Trail” and/or “Snoqualmie”. A fun ride.
I’ll definately be doing it during NUC/UNICON. Bring your Cokers.

john_childs

>From: maxfieldd@aol.com (Maxfield D)
>
>I was driving home over Snoqualmie Pass last weekend, and decided to
>unicycle through the Snoqualmie Tunnel. I had my road wheel with me, and
>no light, but what the heck.
>
>Fortunately, the trail is hard-packed dirt without too many potholes. I
>had a mini-flashlight with two rather old AA batteries. The tunnel is
>2.25 miles long.
>
>I found the darkness very disorienting. I couldn’t see the walls, and had
>trouble knowing if I was going in a straight line. It was a fun
>experience, but next time I’ll bring the Coker and my 12 watt headlamp.
>
>The Snoqualmie Tunnel is part of a 22 mile rail-to-trail packed dirt &
>gravel bike path that would be a cool part of next year’s national and
>international unicycle meets. We could do car shuttles, and go
>downhill all the way. In addition to the tunnel there are super-high
>trestle bridges.
>
>David Maxfield Bainbridge Island, WA


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Last summer my daughters and I were unicycling some of the mountain
bike trails at the Snoqualmie Summit area. It was hot and we were tired
and ready to call it quits for the day. We decided to ride a while in
the tunnel.

The cool air was refreshing. The ground is smooth enough that it is no
problem riding with zero visibility other than the light at the end of
the tunnel. The cool darkness and silence makes for very relaxed riding.
The tunnel was a great way to finish off a day or unicycling even
without a light.

http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! -----==
Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----

One of the problems with the helmet mounted light is that the light shines
straight down your line of sight. You don’t get any cross shadows. The
lack of additional shadows makes it more difficult to see the bumps, dips,
and holes. Things look more washed out and flat.

But it’s better than not being able to see at all.

I love night riding.

john_childs

>From: innes.dunbar@btinternet.com (Innes Dunbar)
>
>I am just back from a ride on my Muni using a head torch to light my way.
>I was riding through some woodland, nothing too severe, but small bumps
>in the dark are a bit different copaired to normal daylight. With the
>trees loosing their leaves, the trail was hard to follow as well. I have
>done night time Mountain biking before, but this was quite different, on
>a mountain bike, you can just ride over the small bumps you don’t notice,
>but on a unicycle those bumps can really be a surprise. It’s good to go
>over the trails that you ride in daylight, and see the difference.
>
>Innes Dunbar


Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp

Quicky thought :

Would that be effective to setup a light on the frame ?

Oli-

-----Original Message----- From: John Childs
[mailto:john_childs@hotmail.com] Sent: Friday, October 12, 2001 2:00 AM
To: unicycling@winternet.com Subject: Re: Unicycling by head torch

One of the problems with the helmet mounted light is that the light shines
straight down your line of sight. You don’t get any cross shadows. The

lack of additional shadows makes it more difficult to see the bumps, dips,
and holes. Things look more washed out and flat.

But it’s better than not being able to see at all.

I love night riding.

john_childs

>From: innes.dunbar@btinternet.com (Innes Dunbar)
>
>I am just back from a ride on my Muni using a head torch to light my way.
>I was riding through some woodland, nothing too severe, but small bumps
>in the dark are a bit different copaired to normal daylight. With the
>trees loosing their leaves, the trail was hard to follow as well. I have
>done night time Mountain biking before, but this was quite different, on
>a mountain bike, you can just ride over the small bumps you don’t notice,
>but on a unicycle those bumps can really be a surprise. It’s good to go
>over the trails that you ride in daylight, and see the difference.
>
>Innes Dunbar


Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp

Quicky thought :

Would that be effective to setup a light on the frame ?

Oli-

-----Original Message----- From: John Childs
[mailto:john_childs@hotmail.com] Sent: Friday, October 12, 2001 2:00 AM
To: unicycling@winternet.com Subject: Re: Unicycling by head torch

One of the problems with the helmet mounted light is that the light shines
straight down your line of sight. You don’t get any cross shadows. The

lack of additional shadows makes it more difficult to see the bumps, dips,
and holes. Things look more washed out and flat.

But it’s better than not being able to see at all.

I love night riding.

john_childs

>From: innes.dunbar@btinternet.com (Innes Dunbar)
>
>I am just back from a ride on my Muni using a head torch to light my way.
>I was riding through some woodland, nothing too severe, but small bumps
>in the dark are a bit different copaired to normal daylight. With the
>trees loosing their leaves, the trail was hard to follow as well. I have
>done night time Mountain biking before, but this was quite different, on
>a mountain bike, you can just ride over the small bumps you don’t notice,
>but on a unicycle those bumps can really be a surprise. It’s good to go
>over the trails that you ride in daylight, and see the difference.
>
>Innes Dunbar


Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp

Quicky thought :

Would that be effective to setup a light on the frame ?

Oli-

-----Original Message----- From: John Childs
[mailto:john_childs@hotmail.com] Sent: Friday, October 12, 2001 2:00 AM
To: unicycling@winternet.com Subject: Re: Unicycling by head torch

One of the problems with the helmet mounted light is that the light shines
straight down your line of sight. You don’t get any cross shadows. The

lack of additional shadows makes it more difficult to see the bumps, dips,
and holes. Things look more washed out and flat.

But it’s better than not being able to see at all.

I love night riding.

john_childs

>From: innes.dunbar@btinternet.com (Innes Dunbar)
>
>I am just back from a ride on my Muni using a head torch to light my way.
>I was riding through some woodland, nothing too severe, but small bumps
>in the dark are a bit different copaired to normal daylight. With the
>trees loosing their leaves, the trail was hard to follow as well. I have
>done night time Mountain biking before, but this was quite different, on
>a mountain bike, you can just ride over the small bumps you don’t notice,
>but on a unicycle those bumps can really be a surprise. It’s good to go
>over the trails that you ride in daylight, and see the difference.
>
>Innes Dunbar


Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp

Quicky thought :

Would that be effective to setup a light on the frame ?

Oli-

-----Original Message----- From: John Childs
[mailto:john_childs@hotmail.com] Sent: Friday, October 12, 2001 2:00 AM
To: unicycling@winternet.com Subject: Re: Unicycling by head torch

One of the problems with the helmet mounted light is that the light shines
straight down your line of sight. You don’t get any cross shadows. The

lack of additional shadows makes it more difficult to see the bumps, dips,
and holes. Things look more washed out and flat.

But it’s better than not being able to see at all.

I love night riding.

john_childs

>From: innes.dunbar@btinternet.com (Innes Dunbar)
>
>I am just back from a ride on my Muni using a head torch to light my way.
>I was riding through some woodland, nothing too severe, but small bumps
>in the dark are a bit different copaired to normal daylight. With the
>trees loosing their leaves, the trail was hard to follow as well. I have
>done night time Mountain biking before, but this was quite different, on
>a mountain bike, you can just ride over the small bumps you don’t notice,
>but on a unicycle those bumps can really be a surprise. It’s good to go
>over the trails that you ride in daylight, and see the difference.
>
>Innes Dunbar


Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp

Quicky thought :

Would that be effective to setup a light on the frame ?

Oli-

-----Original Message----- From: John Childs
[mailto:john_childs@hotmail.com] Sent: Friday, October 12, 2001 2:00 AM
To: unicycling@winternet.com Subject: Re: Unicycling by head torch

One of the problems with the helmet mounted light is that the light shines
straight down your line of sight. You don’t get any cross shadows. The

lack of additional shadows makes it more difficult to see the bumps, dips,
and holes. Things look more washed out and flat.

But it’s better than not being able to see at all.

I love night riding.

john_childs

>From: innes.dunbar@btinternet.com (Innes Dunbar)
>
>I am just back from a ride on my Muni using a head torch to light my way.
>I was riding through some woodland, nothing too severe, but small bumps
>in the dark are a bit different copaired to normal daylight. With the
>trees loosing their leaves, the trail was hard to follow as well. I have
>done night time Mountain biking before, but this was quite different, on
>a mountain bike, you can just ride over the small bumps you don’t notice,
>but on a unicycle those bumps can really be a surprise. It’s good to go
>over the trails that you ride in daylight, and see the difference.
>
>Innes Dunbar


Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp

Olivier Paugam wrote:
> Quicky thought : Would that be effective to setup a light on the frame ?

Oli,

A light on the frame is fine while you’re riding but it’s useless
when trying to freemount offroad. The light is pointing upwards as
you try to mount:

  1. You can’t see the ground.
  2. You lose your night vision.

This is especially bad on a Coker - the light points straight up as you
try to mount. Probably not so bad on a Muni. I had a frame mounted light
for RedBull this year. It’ll definitely be helmet mounted next year.

BTW, of the two points above, the loss of night vision was the worse for
me. My freemounts became more successful when I changed down to 6watts
instead of 10watts.

Regards, Mark.

Fujitsu Telecom Europe Ltd,| o Solihull Parkway, | In the land of the
pedestrian, /|\ Birmingham Business Park, | the one-wheeled man is king.
<< Birmingham, ENGLAND. | O

>The unicycling trip across Minnesota site is up again. It has been down
>for a while. I hadn’t heard that is was going to up again but I clicked
>on it in my favorites list and there it was.
>
>It was great to be able to read it and see the photos of that trip again.
>Thanks to who ever put it back up.
>
>The address is : http://www.outtech.com/unicycle/uam/index.htm

I had to move the website as I switched providers. While I moved it a year
ago, I did not tell anyone.

Besides the UAM (Unicycle Across Minnesota) website, there is also the EUT
(European Unicycle Tour) website at http://www.outtech.com/unicycle/eut/

-Andy

Andy Cotter - Andy.Cotter@OutTech.com Unicycle Video “One Wheel - No
Limit” - http://www.tcuc.org/nolimit/ Twin Cities Unicycle Club -
http://www.tcuc.org European Unicycle Tour -
http://www.outtech.com/Unicycle/EUT/ International Unicycling Federation

  • Director

While that works ok on a bike, I really think helmet-mounted is the way to
go on a uni. Wherever you look, there is light, and if you think about it,
that’s really perfect. You don’t need light anywhere else.

—Nathan

“Olivier Paugam” <opaugam@aptilon.com> wrote in message
news:FD35DC6A97CB2A4DBEBA1152E54452330A59BB@EXCHANGE.aptilon.com
> Quicky thought :
>
> Would that be effective to setup a light on the frame ?
>
> Oli-