unicycles on planes

has anyone here taken a unicycle on a plane after sept. 11? just wondering cause my parents friends have a guest house in new mexico and we are going and i would like to ride on the terrain there. would be awesome if anyone knows about this topic thanks.

I took mine on a plane this past Thanksgiving. I just put everything in the box it came in from unicycle.com and had no problems. They just asked what was in the box and that was that.

Would you be allowed to carry a dismantled 20" on with you? I don’t need to anywhere in the near future, I’m just curious.

24" would be too big wouldn’t it? I’d be worried about it getting poorly handled if I checked it in.

Andrew

basically i just took the seat/tube out and pedals off and shoved it in the box. it was a pretty snug fit, so it didn’t move around. it was a 24x3" and size wasn’t an issue. i also had clothes stuffed in the box as well, so that helped limit any movement.

i don’t know about taking it as a carry-on.

there was a big thread on this around unicon last year. You could try to do a search.

I remember some saying it was important to mention, when asked what is inside the box or bag, to state that it was sports equipment.
Otherwise, you could get “dinged” for carrying a bicycle, even though it isn’t one.

Re: unicycles on planes

I found this: http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=12208&highlight=flying under a search for “flying”

It’s all PRE 9/11, so it might not all hold true now.

You aren’t going to be able to take a unicycle on as carry on. They aren’t allowing things like tools or things that can be used as clubs or some other type of weapon. I would be very very surprised if they allowed you to take a unicycle as carry on now.

For your carry on stuff don’t pack any tools. Put your tools in your checked baggage.

Packing a unicycle as checked baggage is fairly easy. If it’s a 20" or a trials uni you can pack it in a large suitcase. I took my trials uni on a trip over Christmas and packed it in a 29" upright suitcase. Still had plenty of room for a weeks worth of clothes and miscellaneous uni gear.

If you have a 24" or larger unicycle you can pack it in a box. If you still have the box that the unicycle came in you can use that. Otherwise go to a bike shop and ask for a bike box. Cut the bike box down to size to fit the uni. Checked baggage needs to be under 72 linear inches (that is length + width + height). If it is over 72 linear inches you may be charged an oversize baggage fee. The oversize baggage fee can be steep (like $80 each way) so make sure your box is not oversized. If you make your own box make sure you tape it up well so it won’t fall apart. Also, don’t forget to bring extra tape so you can tape it up again for the return flight.

There are also weight restrictions. It used to be that all of the airlines would allow up to 70 pounds for each checked bag for domestic (US) flights. Now some of the airlines have lowered the limit to 50 pounds because they are desperate for new revenue. Any bag over that weight will get charged an overweight fee. Check with your airline to find out if they have a 70 pound or 50 pound limit. If you have a choice when getting your tickets try to get your tickets with an airline that is using the 70 pound limit. I wouldn’t be surprised if in a couple of months every airline has switched to the 50 pound limit. It’s pretty easy to stuff more than 50 pounds in a box with a unicycle when you consider the weight of your unicycle, the weight of the tools, the weight of your gear and the weight of the box.

I think it was How do you transport your uni?

Some air ports are nice-but-therough (Min/St.Paul) while others are just sticklers. I forgot a socket, adapter and extention for pulling cranks in my carry-on; 2 security guys discussed it dowerly for some time before letting me keep it after a verbal reprimand. I think they sympathised with the death of an entire socket set by loss of the adapter.

Jackson has quardend off anyplace you could sit and watch the planes land.

Regardless of max package size before a fee is incured, make sure it is small enough to fit in a CAT scan machine, or your box will be cut open. Also, if flying NorthWest, put a bag around card board boxs or they will mark it as substandard packaging and require you to sign an insurance waver; however, if you just throw your parts in a duffle bag, they have no problem with that -go figure. I used coloured duck tape to cover my box in The Flag; it appeared far less beat up than the plain box Blueshift was packaged. NorthWest allows for 2 checked items, 62" total dimention and 50 lbs each- I was able to leave the frame and wheel (inflated) on my 24" and squeek by.

-Christopher

Re: unicycles on planes

I use a Roach Bag, and check it. I’ve done it often enough over the last few
months that I’ve gotten to know the security folks at the Sioux Falls airport.
When they see me coming they want to know where I’m riding.

I’ve never had a problem.

David Maxfield
Mitchell, SD

Picture of Chris’s box here: http://www.unicyclist.com/gallery/albuo99/112_1235_IMG

I pack my unicycles in a big piece of luggage (search the older threads for my details on this). To my understanding, the luggage rules are basically the same after 9/11 except for what John Childs said about carrying one on.

Always always be very careful to limit all metal objects in your carry-ons or on your person. They will just slow your progress through security. I had the guys at Salt Lake City find a little multi-tool in my butt-bag that even I didn’t know was in there. Those guys were good. Do you suppose the Olympics had anything to do with that? :slight_smile:

Cardboard boxes can be a risky solution. They may be damaged on the outbound trip, and are a lot less durable in a luggage situation than the duffel bag someone mentioned. Before I found my flat-bottomed bags with wheels, I used to use a cloth duffel inside a nylon duffel. This was pretty strong. The nylon bag was older and had some holes in it. But it protected the inner bag so it barely even got dirty.