Unicycle haters - Oppressors to all unicyclists.

Basically i would like to know how to take off my
> cranks and what kind they are so that i can do my best to fit it in a book
> bag. Thanks for any help.
>

Removing cranks is a fairly simple operation but it requires a little time and
some special equipment. There are better ways to get around your problem.

First how to remove cranks, This depends largely on whether you have cotterless
cranks or not. If the cranks do not have a cotter pin holding them onto the axle
then you will need some equipment to deal with cotterless cranks.

You will need something to remove the small covers that protect the crank nuts
from dirt. Some covers screw in and a coin will do the trick unscrewing them.
Others just clip in and will need to be prised out with a knife.

Once you have removed the dirt cover (and hopefully not lost it) you need to
remove the crank nut. This requires either a rachet and socket to fit the
nut or a special piece of equipment I will describe shortly and an
adjustable spanner.

Once the nut has been removed you will need a crank puller (looks sort of like a
wierd spanner) to remove the crank from the axle. The crank puller screws into
the crank and then when turned screws its centre piece into the axle, pushing
off the crank.

The best solution I have found is a small portable crank puller which can also
remove the crank nut. It is about 2 inches long and one inch wide, with no
handle. One end has a hexagonal socket for removing the nut while the other end
screws in and acts as a crank puller. You use it with an adjustable spanner (or
a normal spanner of the right size). This soultion has the advantage of
requiring less tools and being easier to carry.

You should be able to purchase this equipment from any bike shop although you
may need to shop around for the small crank puller.

ALTERNATIVE solutions to combating the stubborn,

It is a lot easier to remove just the pedals and this saves a fair
amount of space.

Your best bet, however, is to see if you can get a quick release for your
seatpost. This enables you to remove the seat. Your unicycle will fit in half
the space and it also requires no tools.

Next get hold of a very lightweight nylon bag for a few dollars and you have
the perfect solution. The bag can scrunch up and fit in your pocket. Before
getting on the bus, remove the seat and place seat and wheel in bag. The
resulting package will be semi rectangular and about 20" * 26" * 12" if you
have a 20" unicycle. This should be small enough to satisfy most people. This
is how I travel with a unicycle on a plane. The bag is only necessary if
people are really assemble. It is a lot quicker to assemble your unicycle and
requires no tools.

Hope this solves your problem.

Peter


                University of Waikato 61 Nevada Rd Peter Bier
                pjb10@cs.waikato.ac.nz Hamilton Unicyclist, juggler and
                mathematician. (07) 856 1103

Hello all. My name is Robbie Olmedo and i have been SUCCESSFULLY riding my uni
for about 2 months now and i am quite an addict. I have even managed to bring it
to school twice. Well, the thing is, that i take an after school bus and the
lady who drives completely got on my case about how it was a bicycle, its not
allowed, and it wont even fit, obviously making a fool of herself considering
this uni isnt a giraffe and has only one wheel. And yes, i tried several
attempts to convince her of this, but to match her wits, she was stubborn as a
mule. Basically i would like to know how to take off my cranks and what kind
they are so that i can do my best to fit it in a book bag. Thanks for any help.

-Robbie Olmedo

Re: Unicycle haters - Oppressors to all unicyclists.

“O’ ShortWan” <fxr80@ix.netcom.com> writes:
>Hello all. My name is Robbie Olmedo and i have been SUCCESSFULLY riding my uni
>for about 2 months now and i am quite an addict. I have even managed to bring
>it to school twice. Well, the thing is, that i take an after school bus and the
>lady who drives completely got on my case about how it was a bicycle, its not
>allowed, and it wont even fit, obviously making a fool of

Hi Robbie, congratulations for achieving successful riding status. Sometimes i
wish i could go back and get that rush i had has a new rider. On second thought,
hold on a minute…

                  ......okay, i'm back from my ride and it's STILL a rush.
                  especially night rides. Anyways, here's some ideas for
                  you. Hook up a strap around your rim and then around the
                  seat, sling the strap over your shoulder and tell the bus
                  driving lady it's your guitar (be prepared to plunk out a
                  tune on the spokes!) Another thought, depending on your
                  wheel size, get an army duffle that opens on one end. I
                  have one that my 20" uni slides right into, and it has a
                  nifty little shoulder strap. I use this frequently when i
                  only need my freestyle uni for a show that i'm flying to.

keep on trying, dustin klem unicycling productions www.dustin.kelm.com

isa 40:29-31

RE: Unicycle haters - Oppressors to all unicyclists.

> bus and the lady who drives completely got on my case about how it was a
> bicycle, its not allowed, and it wont even fit, obviously making a fool of
> herself considering this uni isnt a giraffe and has only one wheel. And yes, i
> tried several attempts to convince her of this, but to match her wits, she was
> stubborn as a mule. Basically i would like to know how to take off my cranks
> and what kind they are so that i can do my best to fit it in a book bag.
> Thanks for any help.

Once again we are reminded that arguing with people who enforce rules, about
definitions of bikes and unicycles, doesn’t work. I say, if it can fit in the
seat with you without taking up the space of another passenger or hindering
their exit in an emergency, it should be okay. But I don’t make the rules for
your bus, the mule does.

Identifying your unicycle for us would be a start in identifying your cranks.
But cranks aren’t made to go off & on all the time, and the cotterless type
would wear out quickly if you did. Taking off the pedals is much easier. Just
remember that the left pedal is threaded backwards.

Or ride it home!

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone


jfoss@unicycling.com http://www.unicycling.com