Uni for Christmas

adrianf@sps.siemens.co.uk wrote:
> I got a unicycle for Christmas, a Bogglefingers 20", I have only managed to g
> et outside once in the dry. I’m not worried about the rain, but I can’t keep
> my feet on the pedals when they are wet, perhaps toe-clips would help :slight_smile:

I find the same in the wet. It’s a shame 'cuz it’s so posey riding down the road
with an umbrella watching the bicyclists get wet… :wink:

> Still I am lucky to have a fairly long lounge and have been learning there us
> ing the backs of two chairs. I can go about 10 feet (3 meters) forwards, sor t
> of in control.

I learnt to ride in the comfort of my lounge. When I first went to a juggling
club people were kinda confused that I could idle for ages but was useless at
riding forwards. :slight_smile:

> Did any other beginners get a unicycle for Christmas ? How are you
> getting on ?

Lots of people at our club got shiny new unis off Santa. I think we counted
eight. Considering that, up to a few months ago, I was the unicyclist of the
club we’ve now got enough for a couple of hockey teams. Wahay. So, two
questions:

  1. Is this sudden interest in unicycling local to Birmingham (UK) or has the
    juggling craze of the last couple of years finally found out where it’s at?

  2. What’s the best kind of (relatively cheap) stick for playing unicycle hockey?
    I’ve got an ice hockey stick but that cost UKP23. If the club’s going to
    splash out for (say) six sticks, we’d want to keep the price a fair bit
    lower. What about street hockey sticks? Are they OK for tournaments or are
    they frowned upon?

> Adrian.

Welcome to the world of unicycling. You’re gonna love it.

Regards, Mark.


Mark Wiggins, | markw@ftel.co.uk +44 (121) 717 6255 Fujitsu Telecom Europe
Ltd,|----------------------------------------- Solihull Parkway, | o Birmingham
Business Park, | In the land of the pedestrian, /|\ Birmingham, | the
one-wheeled man is king. << ENGLAND. | O

Re: Uni for Christmas

Mark Wiggins wrote:

> 2. What’s the best kind of (relatively cheap) stick for playing unicycle
> hockey? I’ve got an ice hockey stick but that cost UKP23. If the club’s
> going to splash out for (say) six sticks, we’d want to keep the price a
> fair bit lower. What about street hockey sticks? Are they OK for
> tournaments or are they frowned upon?

About half of the players in our team bought street hockey stick heads and stuck
them on their own bits of wood. The heads cost about four quid.

Re: Uni for Christmas

Mark Wiggins (M.Wiggins@ftel.co.uk) wrote:

: 2. What’s the best kind of (relatively cheap) stick for playing unicycle
: hockey? I’ve got an ice hockey stick but that cost UKP23. If the club’s
: going to splash out for (say) six sticks, we’d want to keep the price a
: fair bit lower. What about street hockey sticks? Are they OK for
: tournaments or are they frowned upon?

Street hockey sticks are fine! I had an ice-hockey stick to begin with (a cheap
one I brought back from a visit to Canada) and it didn’t take long (6 months?)
before the blade had been ridden over too often and it snapped. I’ve replaced it
with a street hockey blade (3 times now!) and it is fine. Because the street
blades are more flexible, they not only don’t break as often, but also cause
less of a problem if you accidently ‘sub’ (stick under bike (sic)) someone -
they tend to just bend out of the way.

To make things even cheaper, just buy the blades and make your own sticks from
leftover bits of wood - just make sure you sand them down well! If you do this,
it helps to taper one end of the stick so that it fits in the blade more snugly.
Most plastic blades can be shaped after heating them gently over a gas-ring - a
properly curved blade is much better for chipping the ball.

Have Fun!!


Paul Selwood “Smock, smock, smock, smock, smock, smock!”
ps@dcre.leeds.ac.uk --Hobbes