uni.5 on a ramp

Harper… how’d you reckon a uni.5 would fair in a skate ramp? In my limited
/ warped imagination I see the main problem with a normal uni on a ramp
being the ability to pedal fast enough to drop in and come out the other
side. However, with your speedy little geared beastie, these problems might
disappear…

Re: uni.5 on a ramp

“Neil Dunlop” <n.dunlop@kildrummy.co.uk> wrote in message
news:mailman.1025705529.21280.rsu@unicycling.org
> Harper… how’d you reckon a uni.5 would fair in a skate ramp? In my
limited
> / warped imagination I see the main problem with a normal uni on a ramp
> being the ability to pedal fast enough to drop in and come out the other
> side. However, with your speedy little geared beastie, these problems
might
> disappear…

I think maybe you’d just get up some small ramps but don’t expect to do
anything big.

I’ve just wasted some time working out speeds. I don’t go anywhere near
scary ramps though so I might have missed something obvious here. I also did
it on the back of an envelope so the maths might be bollocks too.

for a 10ft halfpipe, you need to reach a speed of about 16.8 mph by the
bottom to have any chance at all of clearing it (that’s basically pedalling
at the speed gravity is taking you). I think that might be doable on a
uni.5, but not that much faster. Problem is once you start wanting to do
tricks on a ramp you want to get air at each end I guess so more speed
needed and friction won’t help either. I guess if you had a smaller ramp, 5
foot or so you might be able to get a couple of feet of air.

I’d think that wouldn’t be too impossible, even on a 24" wheel with a 1.5
geared hub, equivalent to doing 11 mph or so on a normal uni.

The magic number I worked out there is just the speed you’ll pick up from
dropping 10 feet (which is the same as the speed you need to climb 10 feet),
ignoring any friction or whatever, you’d probably need a bit more to be
going fast enough to get right up the other side and stay on.

in general, minimum speed needed for an N metre ramp is about

4.42 * square root of N

in metres / second, to get mph multiply by (3600/1000)*(5/8) which is 2.25

so the speed in mph = 9.945 * square root( height in metres)

Joe

I’m sure I saw a free-wheeling uni’ somewhere on one of these sites. That sort of thing might be better for a ‘drop-in’

I think the problem would be maintaining control of a marginally stable unicycle while first accelerating quickly and then decelerating quickly. The thing you have going for you is that you would be on a smooth surface. The surface is curved but predictable and all of the power moves would be the same and of short duration. In that sense they could be learned in the same way that a process like a kick-up mount on a standard uni or freemount on a giraffe is learned. If Joe’s numbers are correct I think you would want more than 36 gear inches and that would constitute a lot of inertia to overcome. The curvature of the surface must not interfere with the pedals either. And a final note: better you than me.

Re: uni.5 on a ramp

On Wed, 3 Jul 2002 11:47:33 -0500, harper
<harper.7851z@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

> I think you would want more than 36 gear inches and that would
>constitute a lot of inertia to overcome.
Risking that you “win once more”: how is inertia a problem in a
halfpipe? I think you hardly need any pedal force to accellerate,
gravity does it for you.

Klaas Bil

Since my brother is really into skating (the board kind), and we love to watch the extreme sports shows (especially Bluetorch), I’ll comment on this. When you watch pro skaters from the 80s, their style is totally different. There were a lot of skills they couldn’t see at that point. Their boards have changed quite significantly from that time to now. My brother even owns an “old school” board, which was more or less designed to go only one direction. It could go the other direction, but it was more difficult than it is now. The tricks that you see the pro skaters pulling off now just boggle the mind. 10 years ago, even the pros would have thought them close to impossible.

My point with all this is: extreme unicycling is still a very new sport… at least as “wide-scale” as it’s become. I remember lurking about 5 years ago in RSU, and Muni was not as widespread as it is now. I don’t even remember hearing about trials at all. Now, Muni and trials seem to be the blood of this forum. John Foss commented on the coming forth of the glide technique in another post. Somebody had to figure that out… it wasn’t a known possibility before somebody started doing it, but now it’s quite common. When non-unicycling folk see unicyclists riding, sometimes you hear “that’s impossible!” They just don’t see it yet.

I think a unicycle will be developed that will allow for some vert stuff. I think vert stuff is even possible on the stuff we have now. It may take a while for big air to come around, but I think the gear ratio is going in the right direction. It will take huge guts from the first person to drop into a 10-foot high half-pipe… that’s a scary thing even on a bike or skateboard. It will start small. Very small. It will be a revolution when somebody can get enough air out of a small quarter pipe to pull a 180 (ok, half of a revolution) while sideways (parallel to the ground) and then ride out of it (back to perpendicular). I expect that in 20 years from now, it will be as developed as skating.

RE: uni.5 on a ramp

> I think a unicycle will be developed that will allow for some vert
> stuff. I think vert stuff is even possible on the stuff we have now.
> It may take a while for big air to come around, but I think the gear
> ratio is going in the right direction. It will take huge
> guts from the first person to drop into a 10-foot high half-pipe…

Dropping in would be much easier than riding up it and getting “useful” air.
You’d be absorbing all the speed energy instead of trying to build it up. I
bet that with a little practice, Kris Holm could make it down a 10’ quarter
pipe with the Uni.5. In fact, I bet he could do it with one of his regular
MUnis!

But getting sufficient speed, while not bouncing all over the place due to
fast pedaling, will be tough for much in the way of air. We’ll have to see
what people can manage.

JF

Re: uni.5 on a ramp

“John Foss” <john_foss@asinet.com> wrote in message
news:mailman.1026169937.446.rsu@unicycling.org
> > I think a unicycle will be developed that will allow for some vert
> > stuff. I think vert stuff is even possible on the stuff we have now.
> > It may take a while for big air to come around, but I think the gear
> > ratio is going in the right direction. It will take huge
> > guts from the first person to drop into a 10-foot high half-pipe…
>
> Dropping in would be much easier than riding up it and getting “useful”
air.
> You’d be absorbing all the speed energy instead of trying to build it up.
I
> bet that with a little practice, Kris Holm could make it down a 10’
quarter
> pipe with the Uni.5. In fact, I bet he could do it with one of his regular
> MUnis!
>
> But getting sufficient speed, while not bouncing all over the place due to
> fast pedaling, will be tough for much in the way of air. We’ll have to see
> what people can manage.
>
> JF

Pegs instead of pedals?

RE: uni.5 on a ramp

> Pegs instead of pedals?

Balls instead of brains?

Re: uni.5 on a ramp

> > Pegs instead of pedals?
>
> Balls instead of brains?

Well, yeah; basic prerequisite for vert stuff, right?

:slight_smile:

RE: uni.5 on a ramp

> > > Pegs instead of pedals?
> >
> > Balls instead of brains?
>
> Well, yeah; basic prerequisite for vert stuff, right?

No, you need both if you want to get onto the X-Games.

So how were you supposed to ride a unicycle with pegs up a ramp? :slight_smile:

Re: uni.5 on a ramp

> > > > Pegs instead of pedals?[color=darkred]
> > >
> > > Balls instead of brains?
> >
> > Well, yeah; basic prerequisite for vert stuff, right?
>
> No, you need both if you want to get onto the X-Games.[/color]

Why do you need brains to get onto the X-Games?
>
> So how were you supposed to ride a unicycle with pegs up a ramp? :slight_smile:

Ride down a ramp first, use balance and pressure to speed up, like a
skateboarder. We were talking about pipe stuff, right?

Just seeing it in my head I’m thinking handlebars instead of a seat.

RE: uni.5 on a ramp

> Why do you need brains to get onto the X-Games?

Hmmm. It takes brains to understand why you need brains to get onto the
X-Games. I’m not an expert on the games themsleves, but I will assume the
guys you see are at the top of their games. That means that they are better
than all the other guys out there, or at least in the top 10%. By the time
they got to that level, most of the stupid ones were probably sidelined by
injuries.

Put Kris Holm, and a new guy with lots of balls but no brains at the top of
one of the trails at the Vancouver North Shore. Who is more likely to walk
away afterward?

> Ride down a ramp first, use balance and pressure to speed up, like a
> skateboarder. We were talking about pipe stuff, right?
>
> Just seeing it in my head I’m thinking handlebars instead of a seat.

Woah. That would be way, way hard. But I agree on the handlebars though.
Speaking as a B.C. wheel rider, it will take a combination of a lot of luck
and skill to successfully drop in on one side, and make it out on the
other…

JF

Re: uni.5 on a ramp

“John Foss” <john_foss@asinet.com> wrote in message
news:mailman.1026234440.9272.rsu@unicycling.org
> > Why do you need brains to get onto the X-Games?
>
> Hmmm. It takes brains to understand why you need brains to get onto the
> X-Games. I’m not an expert on the games themselves, but I will assume the
> guys you see are at the top of their games. That means that they are
better
> than all the other guys out there, or at least in the top 10%. By the
time
> they got to that level, most of the stupid ones were probably sidelined by
> injuries.

Sounds like a smart person’s prejudice to me.
>
> Put Kris Holm, and a new guy with lots of balls but no brains at the top
of
> one of the trails at the Vancouver North Shore. Who is more likely to walk
> away afterward?

That’s a TERRIBLE example. Put a new guy with lots of balls smarter than
Tesla against KH on a VNS trail and who’s more likely to walk away?

Vert ramps, I’ll note, aren’t anywhere near as scary dangerous as MUni.
>
> > Ride down a ramp first, use balance and pressure to speed up, like a
> > skateboarder. We were talking about pipe stuff, right?
> >
> > Just seeing it in my head I’m thinking handlebars instead of a seat.
>
> Whoa. That would be way, way hard. But I agree on the handlebars though.
> Speaking as a B.C. wheel rider, it will take a combination of a lot of
luck
> and skill to successfully drop in on one side, and make it out on the
> other…

Yeah, doing it without the handlebars would be significantly more
challenging. (8-0)>

RE: uni.5 on a ramp

> Sounds like a smart person’s prejudice to me.

Yes, smart people have an annoying tendency to not die for stupid reasons.
How unfair. You don’t read about many smart people in the Darwin Awards, for
instance. :slight_smile:

> That’s a TERRIBLE example. Put a new guy with lots of balls
> smarter than Tesla against KH on a VNS trail and who’s more
> likely to walk away?

I meant a unicyclists who likes trails and challenges, not a poor slob
who’s smart but has never ridden.

The point being that you don’t have to be a genius, but you have to be smart
enough to “ride smart” and not crash all the time. If you keep putting
yourself out of commission, nobody’s going to want to hire you for
professional sports, for instance, and you are less likely to rise to the
top in your game.

> Vert ramps, I’ll note, aren’t anywhere near as scary
> dangerous as MUni.

True in that there are no sharp rocks to land on, just a nice, flat ramp
surface. And the likelyhood of getting “dangerous” amounts of air is very
low for any unicyclist, at least until somebody figures out how to go fast
enough to do it.

JF

Re: RE: uni.5 on a ramp

The guy with no brains. Kris will ride away.

Ben

Re: uni.5 on a ramp

> > Sounds like a smart person’s prejudice to me.
>
> Yes, smart people have an annoying tendency to not die for stupid reasons.
> How unfair. You don’t read about many smart people in the Darwin Awards,
for
> instance. :slight_smile:

How’d we get from vert ramps to Darwin Awards?
>
> > That’s a TERRIBLE example. Put a new guy with lots of balls
> > smarter than Tesla against KH on a VNS trail and who’s more
> > likely to walk away?
>
> I meant a unicyclists who likes trails and challenges, not a poor slob
> who’s smart but has never ridden.

You might want to rethink the phrase “new guy” then. And it’s still a bad
example: Kris is more likely to walk away than practically anyone else.
>
> The point being that you don’t have to be a genius, but you have to be
smart
> enough to “ride smart” and not crash all the time. If you keep putting
> yourself out of commission, nobody’s going to want to hire you for
> professional sports, for instance, and you are less likely to rise to the
> top in your game.

Kris falls a lot, I UPD a lot, vert ramp skateboarders fall a lot… if
you’re good at falling it’s no big deal. And of course falling in a pipe is
a zillion times safer than falling off a North Shore cliff or a bridge
railing or…
>
> > Vert ramps, I’ll note, aren’t anywhere near as scary
> > dangerous as MUni.
>
> True in that there are no sharp rocks to land on, just a nice, flat ramp
> surface. And the likelihood of getting “dangerous” amounts of air is very
> low for any unicyclist, at least until somebody figures out how to go fast
> enough to do it.

Lower, slower, smoother, softer… safer.

Re: uni.5 on a ramp

> > Sounds like a smart person’s prejudice to me.
>
> Yes, smart people have an annoying tendency to not die for stupid reasons.
> How unfair. You don’t read about many smart people in the Darwin Awards,
for
> instance. :slight_smile:

How’d we get from vert ramps to Darwin Awards?
>
> > That’s a TERRIBLE example. Put a new guy with lots of balls
> > smarter than Tesla against KH on a VNS trail and who’s more
> > likely to walk away?
>
> I meant a unicyclists who likes trails and challenges, not a poor slob
> who’s smart but has never ridden.

You might want to rethink the phrase “new guy” then. And it’s still a bad
example: Kris is more likely to walk away than practically anyone else.
>
> The point being that you don’t have to be a genius, but you have to be
smart
> enough to “ride smart” and not crash all the time. If you keep putting
> yourself out of commission, nobody’s going to want to hire you for
> professional sports, for instance, and you are less likely to rise to the
> top in your game.

Kris falls a lot, I UPD a lot, vert ramp skateboarders fall a lot… if
you’re good at falling it’s no big deal. And of course falling in a pipe is
a zillion times safer than falling off a North Shore cliff or a bridge
railing or…
>
> > Vert ramps, I’ll note, aren’t anywhere near as scary
> > dangerous as MUni.
>
> True in that there are no sharp rocks to land on, just a nice, flat ramp
> surface. And the likelihood of getting “dangerous” amounts of air is very
> low for any unicyclist, at least until somebody figures out how to go fast
> enough to do it.

Lower, slower, smoother, softer… safer.

RE: uni.5 on a ramp

> How’d we get from vert ramps to Darwin Awards?

There’s always time for Darwin Awards.

> You might want to rethink the phrase “new guy” then. And
> it’s still a bad example: Kris is more likely to walk
> away than practically anyone else.

Most of the people posting here are new guys. I use Kris as the example
because he’s a smart guy. If he wasn’t, he’d already be a dead guy.

JF