turns

I wrote:

>> I worked up to doing spins by learning to make very tight ‘leaning turns’ (as
>> opposed to action/reaction turns). Just

Iain asked:

>what is the difference there?

 In a previous posting I explained my terminology but today it occurred to
 me that folks might wonder why I specified one type of turn over the other
 to initiate a spin.

 At my present level of skill, it seems that since the leaning turn is less
 jerky, I go into a spin more smoothly. Things start happening pretty fast
 and the less error correcting I have to do the better. I suppose one could
 learn to use an action/reaction turn too but I think it would be harder.

Dennis Kathrens

RE: Turns

> problem is that I’m really bad at doing fairly sharp (as in radius of ~1.5m)
> turns without waving my arms wildly and frequently falling off. Is there
> something basic I’m doing wrong and does anyone have any tips to improve?

No arm movement is required for turning. All you need to do is steer the wheel
(hips) into the right place in relation to your center of mass to go in the
desired direction. Keeping this in mind should help to get you started…

jf

Re: Turns

When you turn you also need to accelerate. You can’t be too timid when you make
a sharp turn. You need to commit yourself and accelerate through the turn.
You’re pedaling should get quicker as you are making the turn.

Hope this helps.

John john_childs@hotmail.com

----Original Message Follows---- Date: Tue, 19 Jan 1999 21:19:51 +0000 (GMT)
From: Nicholas Guest <nicholas.guest@mansfield.oxford.ac.uk> To:
unicycling@winternet.com Subject: Turns Reply-To: Nicholas Guest
<nicholas.guest@mansfield.oxford.ac.uk>

I’ve been unicycling for about 18 months now (on and off) and can seem to do
most basics- idling, forwrds/backwards, uphill downhill etc. The problem is that
I’m really bad at doing fairly sharp (as in radius of ~1.5m) turns without
waving my arms wildly and frequently falling off. Is there something basic I’m
doing wrong and does anyone have any tips to improve?

Cheers Nick


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Re: Turns

When I was first learning to turn, it helped me a lot to start the turn in the
WRONG direction. In other words, if I want to turn left, I would swivel my hips
slightly to the right. This makes the unicycle move out from under me, and makes
me start falling to the left. Then the only way to recover is with a sharp
correction to the left, which leaves me turned in that direction. Don’t overdo
it. Just a quick nudge in the wrong direction will get you started in the
direction you want to go.

Still, it really is easier for beginners to jerk their way around a turn with
flailing arms. But the jerks wear out the bottom spot on the tire, and jerk
turns are very tiring compared to the smooth-riding turns where the body simply
leans into the turn. The smooth turning skill is well worth learning.

Dave Matthews GoatLover@aol.com

RE: Turns

Hey Dave Matthews, I think this is just what I am looking for. Thank you
from me and my legs.

                                            Paul.spencer@qntm.com
                                            (508) 770-2616

> -----Original Message----- From: GoatLover@aol.com [SMTP:GoatLover@aol.com]
> Sent: Friday, January 29, 1999 3:38 PM To: unicycling@winternet.com Subject:
> Re: Turns
>
> When I was first learning to turn, it helped me a lot to start the turn in the
> WRONG direction. In other words, if I want to turn left, I would swivel my
> hips slightly to the right. This makes the unicycle move out from under me,
> and makes me start falling to the left. Then the only way to recover is with a
> sharp correction to the left, which leaves me turned in that direction. Don’t
> overdo it. Just a quick nudge in the wrong direction will get you started in
> the direction you want to go.
>
> Still, it really is easier for beginners to jerk their way around a turn with
> flailing arms. But the jerks wear out the bottom spot on the tire, and jerk
> turns are very tiring compared to the smooth-riding turns where the body
> simply leans into the turn. The smooth turning skill is well worth learning.
>
> Dave Matthews GoatLover@aol.com