transmission uni

This was brought up on the list at least once before, I thought I would revive
the thread. Its about the idea of having a unicycle with an automatic
transmission within the hub, to achieve higher speeds.

    <a href="http://www.ginko.de/user/thomaskretschmer/website.htm">http://www.ginko.de/user/thomaskretschmer/website.htm</a>

Does anyone know if any progress has been made on this? I see the author of that
site has filed for a patent, I think in Germany. Though in the unicycle
description (there are a variety of bike descritions that use the hub design) he
says that the uni rider probably won’t need all of the gears, or all that speed.

I’m wondering if you can go faster and faster on the uni, or if it would require
too much lean one way or the other as you increase speed? With 24 speeds in the
hub, I think you could get going pretty darn fast… and still be able to tweak
things forward and reverse slightly to keep yourself upright.

RE: transmission uni

> Even the German patent for variable transmission involves a small slip or
> free-wheel between gears. This seems to be the problem with all gear systems
> for Yikes. You either have to stop to change gear or risk having no power to
> the wheel for a fraction of a second (or more depending on how smooth the gear
> change is.)

Is this a fixed-hear hub? If so, how do you freewheel to change gears? If not,
why was anyone considering it as a unicycle hub?

Assuming it’s a freewheel hub, it could be possible to modify it for unicycling,
though you would have to compromise between ability to shift and ability to ride
it without too much of a freewheeling gap. The reality of this would depend on
how much freewheeling is necessary for the gears to be able to change.

Gearing up a unicycle gives you diminished returns, depending on how high the
gear ratio. The higher the gear, the less power you have to control the wheel.
This means, the harder it is not to crash, especially when you’re going fast.

In other words, try out the finished gear ratio before going to all the trouble
of building something you may not ever use. Make some chain drive unicycles with
different gear ratios and see how they ride. This is very cheap by comparison.
It surprises me how many “inventors” out there think of great ideas and go to
tremendous lengths to build things that don’t work. Find a design that works, in
this case a range of gear ratios, and then go to the engineering table to make
it happen.

And don’t forget to send in pictures!

Stay on top (and not so much in the lab), John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone (reply to
jfoss@unicycling.com) http://www.unicycling.com

“Hi. I’m Jeff Lenosky.”

  • David Poznanter

Re: transmission uni

Even the German patent for variable transmission involves a small slip or
free-wheel between gears.

This seems to be the problem with all gear systems for Yikes. You either have to
stop to change gear or risk having no power to the wheel for a fraction of a
second (or more depending on how smooth the gear change is.)

Tall Paul.<><

Laszlo Vecsey <master@internexus.net> wrote in message
news:Pine.LNX.4.10.9911132237560.18836-100000@micro.internexus.net
| This was brought up on the list at least once before, I thought I would revive
| the thread. Its about the idea of having a unicycle with an automatic
| transmission within the hub, to achieve higher speeds.
|
| http://www.ginko.de/user/thomaskretschmer/website.htm
|
| Does anyone know if any progress has been made on this? I see the author of
| that site has filed for a patent, I think in Germany. Though in the unicycle
| description (there are a variety of bike descritions that use the hub
| design) he says that the uni rider probably won’t need all of the gears, or
| all that speed.
|
| I’m wondering if you can go faster and faster on the uni, or if it would
| require too much lean one way or the other as you increase speed? With 24
| speeds in the hub, I think you could get going pretty darn fast… and still be
| able to tweak things forward and reverse slightly to keep yourself upright.
|
|
|