Touring seats

I have an airseat from unicycle.com, and it
is good for 30-45 minutes, but I would like to
find a seat that I could ride for a number of
hours.

Has anyone tried to fit one of those old-style wide
saddles used for “upright” riding on bicycles?

Normal bike seats seem to be optimized for
leaning over with part of your weight on your
hands, whereas in uni ride, all of the weight
is on your butt.

i rode my KH Velo seat (wearing padded cycling shorts) for2 hours, without even the beginnings of tender spots

You’re not supposed to ride mile after mile on a unicycle with all of your weight on your butt. Handle, bumper, or front of seat, you have to put your hand (or hands) somewhere to take off some of the weight. Doing this also gives your upper body a more solid connection with the unicycle, making your pedaling action more efficient.

Also make sure you’re wearing some good cycling shorts. There is a wide range of comfort levels, and you usually get what you pay for. In other words, the more expensive shorts I’ve had over the years were usually (though not always) the most comfortable ones.

After those bases are covered, it boils down to your own personal ergonomics. In other words, we each fit differently onto a seat, so you have to figure out where the pain is coming from, and try reshaping your seat to address this.

Good luck!

Re: Touring seats

You’re not supposed to ride mile after mile on a unicycle with all of
your weight on your butt. Handle, bumper, or front of seat, you have to
put your hand (or hands) somewhere to take off some of the weight. Doing
this also gives your upper body a more solid connection with the
unicycle, making your pedaling action more efficient.

Also make sure you’re wearing some good cycling shorts. There is a wide
range of comfort levels, and you usually get what you pay for. In other
words, the more expensive shorts I’ve had over the years were usually
(though not always) the most comfortable ones.

After those bases are covered, it boils down to your own personal
ergonomics. In other words, we each fit differently onto a seat, so you
have to figure out where the pain is coming from, and try reshaping your
seat to address this.

Good luck!


johnfoss - Old school

John Foss
the Uni-Cyclone
jfoss [at] unicycling [.] com
www.unicycling.com

johnfoss’s Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/832
View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/24058


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Re: Touring seats

It really depends on the riding. If you’re talking about normal road riding,
unless you’re some kind of superman, I doubt a seat exists that will allow
you to ride a standard unicycle for hours. While I’ve ridden over an hour on
road without stopping, nowadays I stop every 45 minutes or so to let the
blood circulate a little.

Muni rides or steep road rides where you are out of the saddle lots of the
time are different. You should be able to go as long as the rest of your
body lasts without getting very sore. After a long Muni ride (5-6 hours), my
butt is typically not sore.

But the hard and sad fact is that unicycling is just not as comfortable as
biking.

—Nathan

<hbaker1@pipeline.com> wrote in message
news:3e6f4fd6.32474558@news.pipeline.com
> I have an airseat from unicycle.com, and it
> is good for 30-45 minutes, but I would like to
> find a seat that I could ride for a number of
> hours.
>
> Has anyone tried to fit one of those old-style wide
> saddles used for “upright” riding on bicycles?
>
> Normal bike seats seem to be optimized for
> leaning over with part of your weight on your
> hands, whereas in uni ride, all of the weight
> is on your butt.

i rode my velo saddle for about 5 hours a few weks ago.
and my butt didnt hurt.

and the viscount seat on my trials uni has to go, its not even comfortable for 5 miniutes.

however i did once meet a german guy(the one who built the other geared hub) who rode long distances on a viscount seat.
apparently he never sat down on it, keeping all his weight on the pedals.
needles to say he had very well toned legs.

I rode my carbon base, carbon handle, air Miyata for 7 hours, no cycling shorts, without trouble.

you mention carbon base. does this make for a more comfortable miyata? i thought it was just for rigidity…or is that why it’s more comfortable?

It’s more comfortable knowing it’s not going to break. Plus it’s a bit slimmer and goes over well with bike shorts.

No arrest for indecent exposure?

Sofa,
I think it’s much more comfortable to ride a cf than a stock miyata built into an air sear. I never thought I needed a cf, because I never have broken one of the plastic ones. The rigidity of the base and slight extra width of the center makes lots of difference.
-Mark