They paved right through the stream

Pretty neat feature that I thought I’d share. I was solo so I don’t have any action pics of me cruising through this, but I did!

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Here in the UK we’d call that a ford.

Quite popular in smaller villages and towns where presumably bridges were out of the budget.

Where I grew up, when the river was high it was fun to watch stupid people still try and get across the ford quickly, and inevitably get stuck in the middle.

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Ha! I love it.

In French it’s called “Radier”.
I was familiar with those because there were numerous in Morocco where I grew up: many rivers had water only occasionaly so a bridge did’nt make sense (but sometimes there was too much water so you’ll have to wait :frowning_face:)

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We still have some in the county where I live we have always called them slab bridges. Very dangerous when we get heavy rains lots of people have been swept down stream in their cars and have to be rescued or drowning’s occurred.

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That happened to my father in southern Morocco: he was suprised by a flash flood and was obliged to leave his GMC that was swept down the torrent. The mechanics at his base camp managed to haul the truck, disassemble it, clean everything (even small parts with a toothbrush), reassemble it and then it started again! (these simple gas-guzzling vehicles were just incredible things)

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Neat on the mechanics, but if the Rian is occasional would a steel barrier or a railing of some kind be hard to install on the downstream side just in case?

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Even if safety-wise it would sound a good idea, it would increase the need for regular maintenance because of all the debris it would accumulate and the added stress it will have to live through (water pressure + corrosion).

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Near where I live, the railings are made so they fold over if the water is flowing. (Parramatta River Parramatta). They wouldn’t necessarily stay upright otherwise.
I tried to find pics on the web for it but couldn’t find any. :frowning:

Maybe it was a once-off.

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Neat, it’s interesting to see because I don’t think we have these in Canada. I live in one of the densely populated areas of the country so even the logging roads and backroads areas will have wooden bridges or DIY ones from the rednecks as the streams are usually flowing year round.

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There are some of these fords or low level crossings in Canada, They do need to meet criteria for aquatic habitat protection but they are generally in low traffic/density areas with low erosion potential. They are often seen as a section of packed riprap in a low section of a gravel road.

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