They don't understand

Have you noticed when you tell someone who does not Unicycle when you manage
something new, or pull off something you have been trying to do for a long time,
they don’t understand why you get exited?

Yesterday I managed to Club Juggle while riding along on my Unicycle, which is a
goal I set myself when I started to Unicycle, but when I tell people all I get
is “Oh that’s good?” Are we really that different?

Thank goodness I can go along to our Juggling Club, and tell people what I have
been doing and get an interested reply.

Innes Dunbar

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/ Before you buy.

Re: They don’t understand

Innes,

I think that part of this is a lack of understanding of what is hard- everything
just looks uniformly hard to a non-rider from simply riding down the street to
the hardest freestyle skills.

In trials demos we run into this all the time and usually its only after the
announcer explains exactly what the rider did that the crowd understands.

-Kris.

— Innes Dunbar <innesdunbar@libertysurf.co.uk> wrote:
> Have you noticed when you tell someone who does not Unicycle when you manage
> something new, or pull off something you have been trying to do for a long
> time, they don’t understand why you get exited?
>
> Yesterday I managed to Club Juggle while riding along on my Unicycle, which is
> a goal I set myself when I started to Unicycle, but when I tell people all I
> get is “Oh that’s good?” Are we really that different?
>
> Thank goodness I can go along to our Juggling Club, and tell people what I
> have been doing and get an interested reply.
>
> Innes Dunbar
>
>
>
>
> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/ Before you buy.


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RE: They don’t understand

> In trials demos we run into this all the time and usually its only after the
> announcer explains exactly what the rider did that the crowd understands.

As a performer, it’s essential to respond to what the audience likes, and be
aware of what doesn’t make a dent in them. Consequently, if you do coasting in
your show, you are basically just doing it for your own jollies.

So far for me, the most amazing unicycle trick to an audience is still jumping
rope on the thing. Or riding a “tall” one. Ooooh.

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

“The hotel was great. You couldn’t trash the place.” - Andy Cotter, praising
the UNICON X Jing Yan hotel, which let us ride in the lobby and pretty much do
as we pleased.

Re: They don’t understand

>
>> I think that part of this is a lack of understanding of what is hard-
>> everything just looks uniformly hard to a non-rider from simply riding down
>> the street to the hardest freestyle skills.
>
>Quite possibly: I have had to explain to several people that just because I own
>a copy of “Universe” doesn’t mean I can ride along the tops of narrow fences,
>down staircases and everything. Not yet anyway…
>
>
>Arnold the Aardvark

I agree with this problem- many times, while out riding with a kid I’ve been
riding with, kids outside the high school where we practice ask us to do a trick
for them. Then, after riding backwards, doing figure eights, and bunny hopping
around while talking to them for awhile, they repeat, “So, do a trick!”

Jeremy Chrisman unicycle@ihateclowns.com


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Re: They don’t understand

Yes.

A while back I gave cryptic clues to a friend, urging them to guess my latest
hobby. The friend came back with “juggling on the unicycle”.

I thought (and said) “Crikey, one thing at a time!”

It was impossible to REALLY share the sense of achievement I felt at riding
resonably reliably at that stage.


Innes Dunbar wrote :
> Have you noticed when you tell someone who does not Unicycle when you manage
> something new, or pull off something you have been trying to do for a long
> time, they don’t understand why you get exited?
>
> Yesterday I managed to Club Juggle while riding along on my Unicycle, which is
> a goal I set myself when I started to Unicycle, but when I tell people all I
> get is “Oh that’s good?” Are we really that different?
>
> Thank goodness I can go along to our Juggling Club, and tell people what I
> have been doing and get an interested reply.
>
> Innes Dunbar

Re: They don’t understand

> I think that part of this is a lack of understanding of what is hard-
> everything just looks uniformly hard to a non-rider from simply riding down
> the street to the hardest freestyle skills.

Quite possibly: I have had to explain to several people that just because I own
a copy of “Universe” doesn’t mean I can ride along the tops of narrow fences,
down staircases and everything. Not yet anyway…

Arnold the Aardvark

Re: They don’t understand

How can you possibly expect them to understand? What single thing have most
non-unicyclists done that they could possibly relate back to the learning of
unicycling in any less vague a way than they might relate to someone else
getting new clothes? They learnt to walk…that was a challenge …but who can
remember that?

Dont think that I am suggesting that everyone is oblivious to the pertinence of
certain achievements…but its not important that they understand either. I seem
to think that if you make what you are doing look difficult the only results
are: a) they dont want to try it themselves b) cant see the point c) can only
possibly think that you dont know what you are doing.

When you do a trick well enough that people dont completely flip out (all things
considerd)…then you are good at it.

he>wazza<him