the term coker

i know what a coker is and what one looks like. (I don’t have one but i want one)

But what i would like to know is what is “coker”

Where did this term come from. Just curious.

punch in unicycle in the “keyword search” to get more direct

I believe it is the name of the company who makes the monster tires.

Now for my question… Who wants to let me try theirs? I’ll be willing to travel any distance to try it, as long as I don’t have to leave my island.

Aloha,
Daniel

I think the Coker Tyre Company make specialist tyres for vintage cars. The Coker wheel (i.e. the unicycle) originated as a rickshaw wheel!

are corkers…

are corkers good for going really fast and stuff? what are the other advantages of them, long distance riding, cruising?

Re: the term coker

treepotato wrote:
> are corkers good for going really fast and stuff? what are the other
> advantages of them, long distance riding, cruising?

Coker, damn it. See okay Eee! Aargh!

Good for speed and distance and coolness. Also killing squirrels and
scaring the shit, literally, out of dogs.


Do not do to others what angers you if done to you by others.
–Socrates

Re: the term coker

foolish wrote:
> I think the Coker Tyre Company make specialist tyres for vintage cars.
> The Coker wheel (i.e. the unicycle) originated as a rickshaw wheel!

You’ve been talking to Alan. The rickshaw wheel was 42" and was made
into a different big wheeled unicycle. No relation to the Coker. I
believe the Coker company make tyres for vintage cars (?)

Regards,
Mark.

Fujitsu Telecom Europe Ltd,| o
Solihull Parkway, | In the land of the pedestrian, /|
Birmingham Business Park, | the one-wheeled man is king. <<
Birmingham, ENGLAND. | O

And small children wielding golf clubs at you!

Re: the term coker

Mark Wiggins wrote:
> You’ve been talking to Alan. The rickshaw wheel was 42" and was made
> into a different big wheeled unicycle. No relation to the Coker. I
> believe the Coker company make tyres for vintage cars (?)

I don’t think Sam got that from me, so maybe someone else is wrong…

Arnold the Aardvark - two feet, two feet, one foot, UPD.

Arundhati Roy on demoscary:
http://www.commondreams.org/views03/0518-01.htm

Re: Re: the term coker

Mark, it is ungentlemanly and unbecoming of you to post this sort of thing without giving full details of where to buy one, the price, and the spec., and posting a picture. An extra 6 inches? My dream!

RBR sells replica, but big unicycles…
“38”, 48", 52" wheels"

(The cranks are cottered.)

In the unicycling world it is common to refer to a unicycle by its manufacturer (eg people own a Coker, a Semcycle, a Schwinn, a DM, a KH etc)

We refer to the coker as such because it was produced and sold by the coker tyre company (under the name the ‘Big One’) The Coker tyre company is named after the founder (Mr Coker himself!) and deals primarily in vintage car tyres.

This does not mean the 36" tyre was ever on a vintage car of any description (although that may be possible). I would guess that the tyre on the coker unicycle was orginally designed for producing the penny farthing with pneumatic tyres that Coker sells. They then extended the idea to producing a bicycle and unicycle seeing as they had the tyres and inner tubes.

You can now construct a coker unicycle with everything but the tyre and inner bought from some where else. Do we still call this a coker? That will depend on what happens with common usage. My guess is that a precedent has been set and many people will refer to these unicycles as cokers as well (The exception is likely to be the owners who have just shelled out 3 to 10 times the price to own a custom coker or KH 36 :slight_smile:

The story that I heard about the 36" tire is that it was made as a replacement for a 1890’s era steam powered car. I don’t know if that is true. Anyone know about 1890’s era cars to be able to identify what car used the 36" tire or whether the tire was ever used on a steam car?

Re: Re: Re: the term coker

Try this link:

http://www.wuk.at/hochrad/shop/grosseseinrad_eng.php

However, I’m not sure that this would give you the desired effect of more speed (solid tyres)

Phil

If you took off the solid tyre and drilled a little hole for the valve, I’m sure you could ask Coker VERY NICELY If they could make a big tyre for it… maybe??

Re: the term coker

Mikefule wrote:
> Mark Wiggins wrote:
>>You’ve been talking to Alan. The rickshaw wheel was 42" and was made
>>into a different big wheeled unicycle.
> Mark, it is ungentlemanly and unbecoming of you to post this sort of
> thing without giving full details of where to buy one, the price, and
> the spec., and posting a picture. An extra 6 inches? My dream!

Details are lost in the mists of time. Luckily we have Google… :slight_smile:

From John Childs…
What was the tire that the Japanese guy used for his 100 mile ride? I
recall that it was a 42" pneumatic tire for a rickshaw. Is a tire like
that still available? If it’s a good tire it would make a good start
for a high end big wheel that is bigger and better than a Coker.

From John Foss…
It was a 42" air tire wheel, very heavy, made from a heavy duty rim
and tire for a rickshaw. I believe this unicycle belongs to Jack
Halpern?

More from John Foss…
The 42" isn’t “around”. A friend of mine in NY who had one built for him
spent about $900, and that was about 10 years ago. It’s a rickshaw wheel
from Asia.

Oh, and a picture of what might be the 42" was posted here by UniBrier…
http://www.unicyclist.com/attachment/99871

So, where to buy one? Asia. The price? $900 14 years ago (post was
1999). The spec? Er, 42" pneumatic tyre. A picture? Check. Sometimes I
even impress myself. :wink:

Regards,
Mark.

Fujitsu Telecom Europe Ltd,| o
Solihull Parkway, | In the land of the pedestrian, /|
Birmingham Business Park, | the one-wheeled man is king. <<
Birmingham, ENGLAND. | O

Mark,

If I’d known my request would receive such a swift and comprehensive response, I would have included a request for you to send me one for a test ride as well! ;0)

Mike

Yes, Coker is a tire company. I’d be fascinated to know the early history of the 36" tire on the unicycles. I notice it has the same “generic” tread pattern they use on many of their other tires. I’ve seen thiem in auto museums on the cars; usually really old ones.

Coker used the 36" tires on the Monster bike first. But I don’t know if that tire came about for some other reason. The old steam car tire is a possibility. If it’s true, we can thank the owners of however few of those are out there, who probably spent an enormous amount of money for Coker to make the initial tires for them.

Before Cokers we had what we call “big wheels.” These were usually hand made by bending smaller bicycle rims into bigger circles and welding them together. The tires were wheelchair rubber or similar types of solid, hard rubber. Tom Miller of the Unicycle Factory made several hundred big wheels, in sizes ranging from 36" to 45" and larger. The common size he made was 40".

Rideable Bicycle Replicas and similar companies make retro-looking bikes, which can be adapted to be unicycles. They also use solid rubber tires which make for heavy wheels and a “boneshaking” ride. These cycles are much better suited for display riding than actual high-mileage transportation. My 45" big wheel is the ultimate parade cycle.

The reason “Coker” is a separate category of large-wheeled unicycle is because it has an air tire. This is a night-and-day difference for comfort. And that difference is what makes the Coker such a usable cycle compared to the hard-tire big wheels. Sure, you can ride one around the world (Wally Watts in the mid-70s), but it ain’t nearly as fun.

Some notable unicyclists have had unicycles made from a 42" rickshaw tire. Sem Abrahams has/had one, as well as a performer I knew in NYC, a rider in Quebec, and Jack Halpern. Jack Halpern’s was used by Takayuki Koike to set the current 100 mile record of 6:44 in 1987. I don’t know where those wheels come from, or if they’re even available anymore. I do know from the two North American owners that a big problem with them was the expense of tires and rims. Not only the money, but the time involved in ordering new ones.

I’m pretty sure the Coker 36" wheel was never intended for a rickshaw. These old 42" wheels had tank rims, similar to what I’ve seen on old Chinese bikes. Relatively indestructable. A Coker rim would not hold up to “industrial” use.

For further information about the 42" wheels, people can try contacting Jack Halpern or Tom Miller.

more info on really big wheels
http://www.wuk.at/hochrad/einrad/martin.php