The continuing UW saga

Greetings,

After about 2 hours of practice, I learned to freemount and ride my UW
about 100 feet.

I’m currently using some soccer shin guards secured with duct tape. They
work much better than they look. Until I aspire to the level of George
Peck, does anyone have suggestions for UW shin guards? Roach, 661, FOX?

It seems easiest for me to put the pedals right in the arch of my foot. Is
this consistent with where other people ride?

Thanks,

George C. Barnes IV President, ISU Unicycling Club
http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gbarnes/

Howdy,

Sorry I have no idea about how to ride an UW yet, as I haven’t even got
one.

One vaguely-off-the-point question though: how much did your UW cost? as I
am getting interested in UWing (I have 3 unicycles). I have no idea about
UW prices ATM.

One more question: how far would you ride your UW? Would you consider ANY
sort of road-ride on it (e.g. down the shops, say 250m away).

Cheers,

Ben L

www.lamigon.com

On Wed, 4 Jul 2001 17:56:59 -0500, “George Barnes IV”
<gbarnes@iastate.edu> wrote:

>Greetings,
>
>After about 2 hours of practice, I learned to freemount and ride my UW
>about 100 feet.
>
>I’m currently using some soccer shin guards secured with duct tape. They
>work much better than they look. Until I aspire to the level of George
>Peck, does anyone have suggestions for UW shin guards? Roach, 661, FOX?
>
>It seems easiest for me to put the pedals right in the arch of my foot.
>Is this consistent with where other people ride?
>
>Thanks,
>
>George C. Barnes IV President, ISU Unicycling Club
>http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gbarnes/

Greetings

In message “Re: The continuing UW saga”, Ben Lamb wrote…
>Howdy,
>
>Sorry I have no idea about how to ride an UW yet, as I haven’t
>even got one.
>
>One vaguely-off-the-point question though: how much did your UW cost? as
>I am getting interested in UWing (I have 3 unicycles). I have no

“UWing” – what an interesting word. I have been collecting unicycling
terms for the last few years, and started work on a multilingual
unicycling dictionary (;lexicography is my profession, see www.cjk.org),
which I am doing at very low grear. If “UWing” catches on you will get the
honor of coining this term :slight_smile: An interesrting recent additon is
“MUnicycle”. I think that with MUni becoming firmly established, it is
time to drop the caps and just call it “mun i”? It is more natural and I
predict will eventually become the norm

BTW, anyone who has any new or interesting unicycling terms please
send them to
me. I am especially interested in terms describing pairs skills as there
seems to be considerable variation, and muni terminology, which is
now evolving.

You will probably be amazed to know that “unicycle” has I think more than
20 synonyms in English – I could post that list if people are interested.

>idea about UW prices ATM.
>
>One more question: how far would you ride your UW? Would you consider
>ANY sort of road-ride on it (e.g. down the shops, say 250m away).
>
>Cheers,
>
>Ben L
>

>www.lamigon.com

>
>
>On Wed, 4 Jul 2001 17:56:59 -0500, “George Barnes IV”
><gbarnes@iastate.edu> wrote:
>
>>Greetings,
>>
>>After about 2 hours of practice, I learned to freemount and ride my UW
>>about 100 feet.
>>
>>I’m currently using some soccer shin guards secured with duct tape.
>>They work much better than they look. Until I aspire to the level of
>>George Peck, does anyone have suggestions for UW shin guards? Roach,
>>661, FOX?
>>
>>It seems easiest for me to put the pedals right in the arch of my foot.
>>Is this consistent with where other people ride?
>>
>>Thanks,
>>
>>George C. Barnes IV President, ISU Unicycling Club
>>http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gbarnes/
>>
>>
>

Regards, Jack Halpern President, The CJK Dictionary Institute, Inc.
http://www.cjk.org Phone: +81-48-473-3508

> I’m currently using some soccer shin guards secured with duct tape. They
> work much better than they look. Until I aspire to the level of George

Ouch, am I the only one with impressions of a painful post-riding
duct-tape hair-removal session as you rip the tape off your legs?

nic

— Jack Halpern <jack@kanji.org>
> wrote: You will probably be amazed to know that “unicycle” has I think
> more than 20 synonyms in English – I could post that list if people are
> interested.

When I’m riding, people around me have only used the words such as
“unicycle,” “that thing,” and even (still trying to figure this out)
“tricycle”.

Post away, Jack

Jeff Lutkus


Free e-Mail and Webspace - http://Unicyclist.com

Ultimate wheel costs: Unicyclesource.com has beautiful 20 inch UW’s at
$159US. If you make your own, then you can cut the price substantially.

Follow the directions at http://www.unicycling.org/unicycling/uwmenu.html

or take a shortcut by buying the ultimate wheel crank kit from Tommi
Miller http://www.tux.org/~bagleyd/unicycle_factory/kits.html

I used Tommi’s kit, a used Sun Phat Albert 26" rim, and a plywood disk. I
probably spent $90US.

A “down the shops” ride would be possible on an UW. However, not having a
seat makes UWheeling a strenuous workout.

David Maxfield Bainbridge Island, WA

Ha, I didn’t explain enough. I put some cloth around my legs before I
taped them down.

“Nicholas Price” <pricen01@tartarus.uwa.edu.au> wrote in message
news:Pine.LNX.3.96.1010705114043.2505A-100000@tartarus.uwa.edu.au
> > I’m currently using some soccer shin guards secured with duct tape.
They
> > work much better than they look. Until I aspire to the level of George
>
> Ouch, am I the only one with impressions of a painful post-riding
> duct-tape hair-removal session as you rip the tape off your legs?
>
> nic

Jack Halpern <jack@kanji.org> wrote:
> interesrting recent additon is “MUnicycle”. I think that with MUni
> becoming firmly established, it is time to drop the caps and just call
> it “mun i”? It is more natural and I predict will eventually become
> the norm

MUni is a trade name, a MUni is the mountain unicycle made by Pashley
cycles of England. Muni or muni is the sport of mountain unicycling, at
the moment the capitalisation seems to depend on the whim of the writer.

The term muni is thought to have been coined by Duncan Castling roughly 6
years ago, he worked with Pashley on the design of the original Pashley
MUni, and came up with the MUni logo stil found on Pashley forks. There
were people riding off road before the MUni was developed of course but
the sport used to known as RTU or UMX in those far off days.

sarah

– Euro-cycle 2001 20 - 22 July Plymouth UK A european unicycle
convention http://www.eurocycle.org

Jack Halpern <jack@kanji.org> wrote:
> interesrting recent additon is “MUnicycle”. I think that with MUni
> becoming firmly established, it is time to drop the caps and just call
> it “mun i”? It is more natural and I predict will eventually become
> the norm

MUni is a trade name, a MUni is the mountain unicycle made by Pashley
cycles of England. Muni or muni is the sport of mountain unicycling, at
the moment the capitalisation seems to depend on the whim of the writer.

The term muni is thought to have been coined by Duncan Castling roughly 6
years ago, he worked with Pashley on the design of the original Pashley
MUni, and came up with the MUni logo stil found on Pashley forks. There
were people riding off road before the MUni was developed of course but
the sport used to known as RTU or UMX in those far off days.

sarah

– Euro-cycle 2001 20 - 22 July Plymouth UK A european unicycle
convention http://www.eurocycle.org

Jack Halpern <jack@kanji.org> wrote:

> English UNICYCLE Standard English MONOCYCLE Traditional (obsolescent?)
> British English ONE-WHEELED VEHICLE “Scientific” English ICICLE colloq.
> (I know one family who use it)

Icicle was a brand name used by (IIRC) more balls than most for a cheap
T-cycle I owned one back in 1991.

> English IKE colloq. (not sure where from – attested) English YIKE
> colloq. (according to Adam Stork)

Popularised by the York UK Unicyclists, it is the standard term for a uni
owned by a York based rider as far I am aware.

> English UNI colloq., very common English WHEEL colloq. English
> ONE-WHEELER Unattested nonce word English ONE-WHEEL BICYCLE Unattested,
> substandard nonce word English BIKE Substandard nonce word English
> ONE-WHEELED BICYCLE colloq., substandard nonce word English ONE-WHEELED
> BIKE colloq., substandard nonce word English TRICYCLE colloq.,
> substandard, childish nonce word English UNI-BIKE colloq., substandard
> nonce word

Used last year by a scotish rider ( doug …) who knew no other riders, it
was his standard term for his unicycle which had been custom built by a
Bike frame builder.

> English MONOBIKE substandard nonce word? (by Phillipino) English ONE
> TRICYCLE colloq., substandard, childish nonce word English BICYCLE
> Substandard illiterate nonce word English UNIQUE colloq. nonce word (by
> Coolberg) English FUNNY LOOKING BIKE substandard informal description
> English FUNNY THING substandard informal description English FUNNY
> LOOKING THING substandard informal description English THAT WEIRD THING
> substandard informal description English THAT SILLY THING substandard
> informal description English THAT THING substandard informal description
> English THAT substandard informal description English THAT OVER THERE
> substandard informal description English WHAT THAT FUNNY MAN’S RIDING
> substandard informal description

British sign Language ( at least in North Yorkshire) , uses the sign for
ONE CYCLE to name a unicycle.

> Do you know of any others, or can you confirm the unattested ones?

I assume you are not includeing such model specific things as BIG WHEEL,
MUNI , MINI , Hockey wheel etc.

sarah

Euro-cycle 2001 20 - 22 July Plymouth UK A european unicycle convention
http://www.eurocycle.org

My giraffe unicycle has been called a “giraffe-a-cycle”.

George C. Barnes IV President, ISU Unicycling Club
http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gbarnes/

“Jack Halpern” <jack@kanji.org> wrote in message
news:200107060203.AA01190@mail.kanji.org
>
> Jack Halpern wrote:
> >You will probably be amazed to know that “unicycle” has I think more
> >than 20 synonyms in English – I could post that list if people are
interested.
>
> Jeff Lutkus wrote…
>
> >When I’m riding, people around me have only used the words such as
“unicycle,” “that thing,”
> and even (still trying to figure this out) “tricycle”.
> >
> >Post away, Jack
>
> Here is the list. Before anyone objects that these are not "real
> synonyms"
I will say
> that you are right, The theory of synonymy is very complex, and involves
fine
> distinctions between absolute synonyms, near-synonyms, synonymous
expressions,
> including unlexicalized nonce words, and more. I will spare you the gory
details.
>
> There are 28 terms in all. The “English” part of the output from the
database implies
> that I have other languages too – actually, quite a few. I will, "one
day", make
> Unicode and gif versions of all the languages. Perhaps use as a T-shirt
for UXI?
>
> Enjoy!
>
> English UNICYCLE Standard English MONOCYCLE Traditional (obsolescent?)
> British English ONE-WHEELED VEHICLE “Scientific” English ICICLE colloq.
> (I know one family who use it) English IKE colloq. (not sure where from
> – attested) English YIKE colloq. (according to Adam Stork) English UNI
> colloq., very common English WHEEL colloq. English ONE-WHEELER
> Unattested nonce word English ONE-WHEEL BICYCLE Unattested, substandard
> nonce word English BIKE Substandard nonce word English ONE-WHEELED
> BICYCLE colloq., substandard nonce word English ONE-WHEELED BIKE
> colloq., substandard nonce word English TRICYCLE colloq., substandard,
> childish nonce word English UNI-BIKE colloq., substandard nonce word
> English MONOBIKE substandard nonce word? (by Phillipino) English ONE
> TRICYCLE colloq., substandard, childish nonce word English BICYCLE
> Substandard illiterate nonce word English UNIQUE colloq. nonce word (by
> Coolberg) English FUNNY LOOKING BIKE substandard informal description
> English FUNNY THING substandard informal description English FUNNY
> LOOKING THING substandard informal description English THAT WEIRD THING
> substandard informal description English THAT SILLY THING substandard
> informal description English THAT THING substandard informal description
> English THAT substandard informal description English THAT OVER THERE
> substandard informal description English WHAT THAT FUNNY MAN’S RIDING
> substandard informal description
>
> Do you know of any others, or can you confirm the unattested ones?
>
>
> Regards, Jack Halpern President, The CJK Dictionary Institute, Inc.
> http://www.cjk.org Phone: +81-48-473-3508

On 5 Jul 2001 05:10:57 -0700, jack@kanji.org (Jack Halpern) wrote:

>Jack Halpern wrote:

>Do you know of any others, or can you confirm the unattested ones?

I live in the Netherlands, and my unicycle has been referred to by
passers-by as “circusfiets”. That would translate as “circus bicycle”
(which was not on your list) except that a “fiets” does not necessarily
have two wheels so it is not illiterate (yet misinformed).

Other Dutch (near) synonyms include “eenwielfiets” and “eenwieler” which
are both quite common.

Klaas Bil

“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “Aegis radar system, kill, Sudan”

, Sarah Miller wrote…
>
>Icicle was a brand name used by (IIRC) more balls than most for a cheap
>T-cycle I owned one back in 1991.

Thanks for all this valuable input! It is a lexicographer’s feast, and I
will update my database.
>> Do you know of any others, or can you confirm the unattested ones?
>
>I assume you are not includeing such model specific things as BIG WHEEL,
>MUNI , MINI , Hockey wheel etc.

This list strictly refers to the standard unicycle. Novelty or specialy
unicycles are a subject in their own right and are also covered by my
dictionary. There are hundreds of terms for these. If you know of any
others, please send them along.

P.S. What is a MINI?.

Regards, Jack Halpern President, The CJK Dictionary Institute, Inc.
http://www.cjk.org Phone: +81-48-473-3508

Greetings

In message “Re: Unicycle synonyms”, Klaas Bil wrote…
>On 5 Jul 2001 05:10:57 -0700, jack@kanji.org (Jack Halpern) wrote:
>
>>Jack Halpern wrote:
>
>>Do you know of any others, or can you confirm the unattested ones?
>
>I live in the Netherlands, and my unicycle has been referred to by
>passers-by as “circusfiets”. That would translate as “circus bicycle”
>(which was not on your list) except that a “fiets” does not necessarily
>have two wheels so it is not illiterate (yet misinformed).
>
>Other Dutch (near) synonyms include “eenwielfiets” and “eenwieler” which
>are both quite common.

That is good to know. The only entries I have for Duch are as follows:

Dutch EENWIELER standard Dutch EENWIELFIETS colloq.? variant

From your message it is clear that neither of these are standard. So
please tell me what the standard one is and add whatever else to the
entries you think is appropriate. Thanks.

Regards, Jack Halpern President, The CJK Dictionary Institute, Inc.
http://www.cjk.org Phone: +81-48-473-3508

Greetings

In message “Re: The continuing UW saga & unicycling terms”, Sarah
Miller wrote…
>Jack Halpern <jack@kanji.org> wrote:
>> interesrting recent additon is “MUnicycle”. I think that with MUni
>> becoming firmly established, it is time to drop the caps and just call
>> it “mun i”? It is more natural and I predict will eventually become
>> the norm

Thanks for this information, Sarah. I will make sure it is recorded in my
dictionary so that the etymology is known. It is rare in lexicography that
the etyomlogy of a word can be known with certainty.

>
>MUni is a trade name, a MUni is the mountain unicycle made by Pashley
>cycles of England. Muni or muni is the sport of mountain unicycling, at
>the moment the capitalisation seems to depend on the whim of the writer.
>
>
>The term muni is thought to have been coined by Duncan Castling
>roughly 6 years ago, he worked with Pashley on the design of the
>original Pashley MUni, and came up with the MUni logo stil found on
>Pashley forks. There were people riding off road before the MUni was
>developed of course but the sport used to known as RTU or UMX in those
>far off days.
>
>sarah
>
> – Euro-cycle 2001 20 - 22 July Plymouth UK A european unicycle
> convention http://www.eurocycle.org
>

Regards, Jack Halpern President, The CJK Dictionary Institute, Inc.
http://www.cjk.org Phone: +81-48-473-3508

> Jack Halpern <jack@kanji.org> wrote:
> > interesrting recent additon is “MUnicycle”. I think that
> with MUni becoming firmly
> > established, it is time to drop the caps and just call it
> “mun i”? It is more
> > natural and I predict will eventually become the norm
>
>
> MUni is a trade name, a MUni is the mountain unicycle made by Pashley
> cycles of England. Muni or muni is the sport of mountain unicycling, at
> the moment the capitalisation seems to depend on the whim of the writer.

The Pashley stickers I’ve seen all say “Muni.” The double-caps thing is
all my fault. I’ve called it MUni since I started promoting MUni Weekends
or around that time. I agree that this type of caps usage is wrong, so we
should chill out and go back to “Muni” or “muni.” But when I see it that
way, it looks like something that should be pronounced “munny.”

> The term muni is thought to have been coined by Duncan Castling
> roughly 6 years ago, he worked with Pashley on the design of the
> original Pashley MUni, and came up with the MUni logo stil found on
> Pashley forks.

That being the case, Duncan should be in charge of what gets capitalized!

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

There can be a fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” – scary
reality-check for unicyclists

> John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com www.unicycling.com
>
>
> There can be a fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” – scary
> reality-check for unicyclists

I’m constantly having to correct people from using the word “obsession” to
use “passion” instead :wink:

No, I think you got to the wrong conclusion as to what the standard term
is. I just mentioned “circusfiets” first because the translation did not
occur in your list of English terms, so I could add there (if “circus
cycle” or anything similar is at least used in English).

I don’t know what exactly you mean by standard. EENWIELFIETS is best
understood by the general public, because EENWIELER could be interpreted
as a broader term, to include pizza cutters, curvimeters or in general
anything with but one wheel. EENWIELER, on the other hand, is the most
used term in circles of unicyclists, at least the ones I am part of.
Amazingly, my Dutch dictionary (Van Dale comprehensive edition 1976)
gives neither term. CIRCUSFIETS is also not included, rightfully so IMHO;
it seems to be just used (occasionally) because it reminds people of
circuses (circi?).

Unfortunately I do not know other Dutch synonyms. Terms like THAT THING
are sometimes used, of course, but I would not call that a synonym. It
could as well be used for a pizzacutter, a car or a 7/16" hex wrench to
name I few.

It’s time I stop typing.

Klaas Bil

On 5 Jul 2001 17:51:48 -0700, jack@kanji.org (Jack Halpern) wrote:

>Greetings
>
>In message “Re: Unicycle synonyms”, Klaas Bil wrote…
> >On 5 Jul 2001 05:10:57 -0700, jack@kanji.org (Jack Halpern) wrote:
> >
> >>Jack Halpern wrote:
> >
> >>Do you know of any others, or can you confirm the unattested ones?
> >
> >I live in the Netherlands, and my unicycle has been referred to by
> >passers-by as “circusfiets”. That would translate as “circus bicycle”
> >(which was not on your list) except that a “fiets” does not necessarily
> >have two wheels so it is not illiterate (yet misinformed).
> >
> >Other Dutch (near) synonyms include “eenwielfiets” and “eenwieler”
> >which are both quite common.
>
>That is good to know. The only entries I have for Duch are as follows:
>
>Dutch EENWIELER standard Dutch EENWIELFIETS colloq.? variant
>
>From your message it is clear that neither of these are standard. So
>please tell me what the standard one is and add whatever else to the
>entries you think is appropriate. Thanks.
>
>
>Regards, Jack Halpern President, The CJK Dictionary Institute, Inc.
>http://www.cjk.org Phone: +81-48-473-3508
>


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “terrorist, Saddam Hussein, CIA”

> Dutch EENWIELER standard Dutch EENWIELFIETS colloq.? variant

When I was in Holland in 1983 staying with the Abrahams, I remember being
taught “eenwielfiets” as the main term they used. I have also heard
eenwieler from other Dutch riders.

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com www.unicycling.com

There can be a fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” – scary
reality-check for unicyclists

> Dutch EENWIELER standard Dutch EENWIELFIETS colloq.? variant

When I was in Holland in 1983 staying with the Abrahams, I remember being
taught “eenwielfiets” as the main term they used. I have also heard
eenwieler from other Dutch riders.

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com www.unicycling.com

There can be a fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” – scary
reality-check for unicyclists