stand up ww

I’m finally learning stand up ww and have a question. When you use your toe to push the wheel, does your heel stay on the frame? Also I need any helpful tips.

Mark

No your heel doesnt stay on the frame. At least mine doesnt

Watch this video of Leo and you can see how his foot is not on the frame:

http://www.unicyclist.org./cont/play.cfm?pi=w320240standupwwc

Some tips that helped me are to not push the wheel to far in a push, squeeze the seat with your knees, and look straight ahead, not down. For the tranisitions (getting up and getting down-i am working on these now) i think the easiest way is to just jump off the pedals up to the frame. Its scary at first but you will find it alot easier then to get into from riding or idling. Just make sure your feet done slip off the frame when you jump! Hope this helps.

Generally the heel of the driving foot does not sit on the frame. However, on a few occasions, I have accidentally left the heel of my driving foot on the frame when I did the transition, and I was still able to stand-up wheel walk a ways. I don’t recommend doing it deliberately, though.

I worked on it last night and this morning and can now go about 10-15 feet but I always fall of forward. Whats my problem? Do I just need to lean back more?
:thinking:

If you fell forward, your ‘continious fall’ is too much forward or your wheel goes too slow.
Don’t bend over: look forward.
And make very firm pushes with your propelling foot.
Make your steps as long as possible.

This lead me to a question about your weight distribution. Do you have all your weight on the foot which stay on the frame ?
If the push is firm, it’s because you transfer part of your weight on your propelling foot, isn’t it ?

Manuel

ive been doing stand up ww’s for maybe jsut a few months. i noticed right off that if your wheel is going to fast, like you kicked to hard, jsut do a very short stand up glide and apply more pressure to the wheel. helps me

I find that most of my weight is on the foot that is on the frame. If too much weight is on the pushing foot, the stand-up move becomes jerky. The less weight, the smoother the look.
Something to think about - when you do wheel walk (sitting on the seat) you only put enough weight/force on your feet to push the wheel forward. It is the same thing with stand-up.

Connie

Right now I’m practicing seat on side standup wheel walk, and also the transition into it from seat on side idle. Is this a good way of getting into it? Also, what is a good transition out of this trick? Is there a way to do this skill freehanded?

TCUC riders use a variety of methods for getting into seat on side standup wheel walk (what a cumbersome name… ): from crank idle, from seat on side idle, and even from regular standup wheel walk. Either of the first two methods are about the same - it depends on how strong those two skills are. Some of our riders like to have the seat on the left for crank idle, but seat on the right for ss-standup-ww. They get into it from just riding seat on side and stepping up. I think this is more difficult than idling.

There are a few methods for getting out of the skill. For my examples, I’ll assume the seat is on the right and pushing is done with the right foot. Method 1: Step down when the left pedal is just below horizontal and in front and quickly put the 2nd foot onto the right pedal as it comes over the top. Go into seat on side idle or seat on side riding.
Method 2: Similar to method 1, but the left foot goes down when the left pedal is in back and near bottom. Put the second foot on the right pedal and you’d have to do a seat on side idle.
Method 3: Left foot goes down when pedal is at bottom (but slightly closer to the back). Flip the second leg around so you end up sitting - like a side mount. Either idle or ride away.

Freehanded is definitely possible. You just have lean a little more and make sure the standing foot is leaning on the seat.

I can try to get a few videos of the methods at practice tonight and post tomorrow… if you’re interested?

Connie

I’ve been working on stand-up wheel walk, seat on side, lately. I can mount into it, and sometimes go a little ways, my best effort so far being twenty-five steps. I haven’t actually gotten the transition into it yet, but I’ve come pretty close to doing it from seat on side riding. Another way which I have tried, but not quite gotten is going right from idling. It’s kind of hard to explain, but it goes something likes this: idle right foot down, put left foot overlapping frame and wheel, put your right foot on the wheel behind the frame, raise yourself off the seat, turn 90 degrees to the right, bring your left foot around so that it’s on the right side of the frame, turn another 90 degrees to the right, and start pushing the wheel with you right foot. If all has gone right, you should be doing stand-up wheel walk, seat on side with the seat reversed.

I’d love to see some more videos of this skill.

Reading more about this skill, I’m not sure I’m doing it the right way.

My left foot is my pushing foot so to say, and I keep the seat to the left of me, which is why I get into the skill from seat on side idling with the “wrong” foot down…

You beat me to it! I was just about to post this description of how I get into Diaki Walk (we call it that because it’s easier than saying seat on side stand up wheel walk and because as far as I know he was the first to do it…). That’s how I learned right off the bat a couple years ago and think it’s the coolest looking way to get into it since you’re just sitting there idiling and then all of a sudden you do a like walk around type move into diaki walk. That’s actually the only way I know how to get into it because I haven’t yet tried the other methods, but I’m guessing they’ll be easier than this method. I think you did a pretty good description of how to get into it but it is kinda hard to explain in words.

As for getting out of it, I hop on wheel with the seat behind me, then put the seat in between my legs and hop on wheel with the seat in front and then get out of that. But I just thought of something, wouldn’t it be cool to get out of it the way you got into it, meaning you’d do a like reverse walk around to idling? Sounds hard but maybe I’ll try it tonight…