sniper suspect's family back death penalty

man, that’s a pretty damning endorsement. When your own family thinks you
deserve the death penalty.


Rodney Blackwell - site owner/administrator

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Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

If someone in my family did that, I would too…

Rodney Blackwell wrote:
>
> man, that’s a pretty damning endorsement. When your own family thinks you
> deserve the death penalty.
> http://tinyurl.com/2bmx
>


Jay Tierney – jay@jaytierney.com

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

When someone did what that guy did (assuming that he is proven guilty) , he
is not longer worthy of being a member of ANY family. He is no longer human.

Eugene

“Rodney Blackwell” <rodney@webdiscuss.com> wrote in message
news:app573$hlb$1@www.darklock.com
> man, that’s a pretty damning endorsement. When your own family thinks you
> deserve the death penalty.
> http://tinyurl.com/2bmx
>
>
>
> –
> Rodney Blackwell - site owner/administrator
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> http://T-ShirtCountdown.com http://RateMyTee.com/
> http://ihateclowns.com/ http://Globie.com/
> http://DomainJunkies.com/ http://5R5.NET
> http://GotPaintball.com/ http://CircleRPrinting.com
> ------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

“Jay Tierney” <jay@jaytierney.com> wrote in message
news:3DC02341.B7CF5E4@jaytierney.com
> If someone in my family did that, I would too…

So you’re saying you believe in the death penalty?


Rodney Blackwell - site owner/administrator

http://T-ShirtCountdown.com http://RateMyTee.com/
http://ihateclowns.com/ http://Globie.com/
http://DomainJunkies.com/ http://5R5.NET
http://GotPaintball.com/ http://CircleRPrinting.com

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

Rodney Blackwell wrote:
>
> So you’re saying you believe in the death penalty?

I do! I don’t want to be the one condemning people to death, but I feel
it’s necessary.

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

Here I share my opinion, it is not an attack against nor an argument with
anybody, it is simply my position.

I still do not support the death penalty, even under these circumstances. I
believe that all people retain their humanity, and therefore their basic
human rights, regardless of what they have done. It is understandably very
difficult for many people to see that, but I believe it to be true. They
still deserve to have and be treated with the dignity that belongs to all
human beings.

Retaliation is neither an ethical nor sensible response. Killing simply
does not justify more killing. They’ve already claimed 10 lives, it is not
right for us to add two more to the kill count. Violence is simply not a
solution, this is why the majority of developed nations have moved beyond
the death penalty. Even a life sentence is not automatically justified by
these crimes, nobody “deserves” to be punished.

While punishment plays a large role in classical conditioning of children,
and it even works on adults, its effectiveness drops off steeply as people
move into teenage years and beyond. Certainly the promise of a severe
punishment serves as a deterrent against committing crimes in the first
place, but there are other, far more humane ways of preventing crimes and
reducing the number of people with a violent disposition.

That being said, the only sensible reason for any sort of punishment is to
prevent the person from hurting any more people. Jailing and other methods
of “justice” should only be for the purpose of protecting the public for as
long as, and only as long as, the person is a threat to society.

I know and understand that not everyone shares my position, and I know that
many people have a hard time sympathizing with or even acknowledging my
opinion here, and I accept that. My position is based on the same
fundamental ideals and concepts that lead me to my position with regard to
human rights (Re: Local bigot fired at Kodak). I am not yet able, however,
to communicate the reasons for my stance on punishment as well as I am my
position on human rights.

I am also the victim of a violent crime, so I am not ignorant to the
feelings and emotions that come with being victimized. The incident still
served to further root me in my belief that all people deserve the same love
and compassion, regardless of what they have done.

-Dan Lauber
djlauber@uwm.edu

“Rodney Blackwell” <rodney@webdiscuss.com> wrote in message
news:app573$hlb$1@www.darklock.com
> man, that’s a pretty damning endorsement. When your own family thinks you
> deserve the death penalty.
> http://tinyurl.com/2bmx
>
>
>
> –
> Rodney Blackwell - site owner/administrator
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> http://T-ShirtCountdown.com http://RateMyTee.com/
> http://ihateclowns.com/ http://Globie.com/
> http://DomainJunkies.com/ http://5R5.NET
> http://GotPaintball.com/ http://CircleRPrinting.com
> ------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

Dan Lauber wrote:
>
> I still do not support the death penalty, even under these circumstances. I
> believe that all people retain their humanity, and therefore their basic
> human rights, regardless of what they have done.

I believe that too. However I still support the death penalty, because I
also believe that some people are going to remain a danger to society no
matter what we can reasonably (or unreasonably) do to rehabilitate them.
In that case, either we imprison them for the rest of their lives at
what will amount to great cost to society, with the possibility that
they can escape or otherwise create great havoc still, or they forfeit
their lives.

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

“Shena Delian O’Brien” <shena@darklock.com> wrote in message
news:3DC0535E.6030506@darklock.com

> In that case, either we imprison them for the rest of their lives at
> what will amount to great cost to society

It actually costs more to put someone to death than to keep them in prison
for the rest of their life.


Rodney

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

Rodney Blackwell wrote:
>
> It actually costs more to put someone to death than to keep them in prison
> for the rest of their life.

Even if they manage to get out and go on other criminal rampages? even
if they cause great havoc in the institution they are imprisoned in…?

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

“Shena Delian O’Brien” <shena@darklock.com> wrote in message
news:3DC05684.1000208@darklock.com
> Rodney Blackwell wrote:
> >
> > It actually costs more to put someone to death than to keep them in
prison
> > for the rest of their life.
>
> Even if they manage to get out and go on other criminal rampages? even
> if they cause great havoc in the institution they are imprisoned in…?

That’s a lot of “what ifs” :slight_smile: I was just commenting on your statement about
the costs. It does cost ($) more to put someone to death than to keep them
in prison. If you want to consider immeasureables, then it is debatable. But
I would still say it costs more to put them to death (because the “what ifs”
of killing the wrong person would also count in the immeasurables).


Rodney

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

Rodney Blackwell wrote:
> It actually costs more to put someone to death than to keep them in prison
> for the rest of their life.

Why does it cost more?

  • Gilby

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

Rodney Blackwell wrote:
>
> That’s a lot of “what ifs” :slight_smile: I was just commenting on your
> statement about the costs. It does cost ($) more to put someone to
> death than to keep them in prison. If you want to consider
> immeasureables, then it is debatable. But I would still say it costs
> more to put them to death (because the “what ifs” of killing the
> wrong person would also count in the immeasurables).

It’s a difficult subject to quantify, that’s true. I do admit that part
of my decision hinges around both the fairly primal instinct of killing
everything that would be a danger to me and mine, and a completely
ruthless streak that would prefer the world be less populated by
dangerous criminals.

It may not be nice and it may cost more but it is more expedient to
simply put down the mad dog than try to rehabilitate or cage it. Why
does it cost more to execute criminals? That’s one thing I think we
should answer … it shouldn’t cost more. If you’re going to kill
someone, just do it. Don’t beat around the bush and cost the taxpayers
tons of money.

Killing the wrong person is tragic. Like I said, I would not want to be
the one who had to make the choice on whether or not someone should live
or die for a crime, but I would do it if I had to and I would support
someone else in doing so if I felt they were just.

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

“Gilby” <mail@gilby.com> wrote in message
news:appm2a$v99$1@www.t-shirtcountdown.com
> Rodney Blackwell wrote:
> > It actually costs more to put someone to death than to keep them in
prison
> > for the rest of their life.
>
> Why does it cost more?

The various costs associated with enforcing the death penalty are numerous.
Mostly in legal fees for trials, appeals, and related costs.

Here’s one site that came up in a google search:
http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/costs2.html


Rodney

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

“Shena Delian O’Brien” <shena@darklock.com> wrote in message
news:3DC05D6D.3060203@darklock.com
>
> It may not be nice and it may cost more but it is more expedient to
> simply put down the mad dog than try to rehabilitate or cage it. Why
> does it cost more to execute criminals? That’s one thing I think we
> should answer … it shouldn’t cost more. If you’re going to kill
> someone, just do it.

It takes a lot to prove that someone deserves to die in the current legal
system. Mostly the legal fees for trials and appeals make the costs much
more than a non-death penalty sentence.

You can’t “just do it” when lives are involved within the legal system. You
have to have proof, and more proof, and you have to make sure that you have
the right person. If you were to “just do it”, there would be a number of
innocent people that get killed.


Rodney

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

Rodney Blackwell wrote:
>
> You can’t “just do it” when lives are involved within the legal system. You
> have to have proof, and more proof, and you have to make sure that you have
> the right person. If you were to “just do it”, there would be a number of
> innocent people that get killed.

Well, I have to agree with that in some way. However, I think a lot of
criminals have all the proof in the world (witnesses, footage, etc) that
they really did commit their crimes; the legal proceedings are just
miles of appeals based on how they “just shouldn’t die” or something. I
think we should cut down on THOSE proceedings, personally. When there’s
a reasonable doubt, sure, fight it.

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

I believe the death penalty is over-used, but in some cases I do believe
in it. Mainly, random, pointless acts of violence are worthy of such
punishment in my eyes (i.e. shooting someone you don’t even know who is
walking out of a Home Depot). Murder in the heat of passion or
something like that is different IMHO.

Rodney Blackwell wrote:
>
> So you’re saying you believe in the death penalty?
>


Jay Tierney – jay@jaytierney.com

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

“Shena Delian O’Brien” <shena@darklock.com> wrote in message
news:3DC068E4.4060508@darklock.com
> Well, I have to agree with that in some way. However, I think a lot of
> criminals have all the proof in the world (witnesses, footage, etc) that
> they really did commit their crimes; the legal proceedings are just
> miles of appeals based on how they “just shouldn’t die” or something. I
> think we should cut down on THOSE proceedings, personally. When there’s
> a reasonable doubt, sure, fight it.

That’s why I think if we are going to have the death penalty, it needs to be
revamped.

For example, the guy that came in and shot up my school and held kids
hostage back in 1992. He pleaded “Not Guilty”, but he got the death penalty.
He might get executed in 50 years or something.

Now with this type of case, there is no “shadow of a doubt” or “reasonable
doubt”. He did it. I was there, I saw him do it. He got caught in the act of
doing it. There are about 200 witnesses that saw him do it. There is no
doubt that he’s guilty. In this case, things should move much faster.

However, there are a lot of cases that aren’t as clear that really shouldn’t
even be considered for the death penalty.


Rodney

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

First of all, those are YOUR ethics and they do not rule over others.

Secondly, retaliation or retribution IS a “sensible” response in that it
is a natural reaction - to say it is insensible is an insensible
statement (it’s been happening for thousands of years so retaliation
isn’t some sort of phenomenon of illogical thought).

Dan Lauber wrote:
>
> Retaliation is neither an ethical nor sensible response.


Jay Tierney – jay@jaytierney.com

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

This is exactly how I feel. To those who are against the death penalty
in ALL cases, please explain to me the justice in this scenario: you
don’t kill a complete psycho, he breaks out of prison and kills someone
else.

Shena Delian O’Brien wrote:
>
> I believe that too. However I still support the death penalty, because I
> also believe that some people are going to remain a danger to society no
> matter what we can reasonably (or unreasonably) do to rehabilitate them.
> In that case, either we imprison them for the rest of their lives at
> what will amount to great cost to society, with the possibility that
> they can escape or otherwise create great havoc still, or they forfeit
> their lives.


Jay Tierney – jay@jaytierney.com

Re: sniper suspect’s family back death penalty

I’ve heard this for a long time, but I’ve also heard that this is a
flawed study that doesn’t count a lot of variables (such as the expense
of buliding more prisons, etc.).

I wonder if it’s true or not?

Rodney Blackwell wrote:
>
> It actually costs more to put someone to death than to keep them in prison
> for the rest of their life.
>
> –
> Rodney


Jay Tierney – jay@jaytierney.com