Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X

Up to now, in major events, only standard unis with wheels up to 24" in diameter
has been allowed. Most people do use a 24 incher, although some do prefer 20"
because of more control and quickness. Because of the growing popularity of the
26" wheel (and some players may not own a smaller uni), John asked to have this
size considered. We do not have any 26" uni in Puerto Rico, so we tried with 28"
Sem’s that we have and enjoy. After further review, our unanimous opinion in PR
is that we stay with the 24" limitation. Already it is too busy underneath (in
the 4 second area) with very little space to allow larger unis. The result will
be more falls and will result in a more much dangerous game. It also resulted in
many boring mismatches. I would like the feedback of Sem and other persons that
has been practicing. Also, Rolf, how has unihockey addressed this problem?

Alberto Ruiz http://www.unicycling.org/iuf/unicon10/

RE: Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X

> “For international competitions, the maximum wheel size is 24”. The unicycles
> must not have sharp or protruding parts anywhere which might cause injuries.
> This refers especially to quick-release levers and bolts. The pedals must be
> plastic or rubber."
>
> I agree that it could be dangerous to allow larger wheels.

I agree with Rolf and Alberto. Though people can modify the rules for local
games, for international competition I think we should stick to max. 24" for
now. We should use the same passage as above for the basketball rules.

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

“I’m not into pain. I’m into juggling.” - A grandpa with small child at the
Davis Picnic Day, walking away from the free unicycle lessons toward the free
juggling lessons (and already able to juggle!)

RE: Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X

> I believe that we can put the exact wording for basketball. Also, can you
> organize this item and the others items in my previous posting with numbering
> that will integrate the Rules of Basketball with the other IUF Rules?

This is what I came up with. I don’t think the items are in a sensible order and
would like other peoples’ comments on that. Also I kept one or two items from
the “bogus” basketball rules we had published in there before, mainly the part
on dribbling.

I also used the “suggested rewrite” versions I submitted the other day.
Everybody please read and comment:


9 UNICYCLE BASKETBALL

INTERNATIONAL UNICYCLING FEDERATION GUIDELINES In IUF competition, unicycle
basketball is played using the international rules for regular basketball with a
few changes. The items below, in combination with standard international
basketball rules, are what are used for UNICON competition.

9.1 UNICYCLES For international competitions, the maximum wheel size is 24".
The unicycles must not have sharp or protruding parts anywhere which might
cause injuries. This refers especially to quick-release levers and bolts. The
pedals must be plastic or rubber.

10.2 STEPS AND TRAVELING The player is allowed two steps. A step is a half
revolution of the wheel, meaning that each wheel revolution is the equivalent
of two steps because pedaling with one leg only moves the wheel half a
revolution. However, if as a continuation of the play the ball is thrown or
passed, an extra (third) half revolution is allowed. This extra step is the
equivalent to the jump in regular basketball.

11.3 IDLING Idling is equivalent to the pivot foot and therefore is allowed.
Twisting, where the pedals stay at the same height, while you move the
unicycle left and right is also considered your pivot foot, and therefore
allowed. Doing both, (idling and twisting) before letting the ball go is not
allowed and will be considered traveling. The player must also stay within a
one meter radius from the point where the idling or twisting started.

12.4 PLAYER ON UNICYCLE The player can only play the ball while mounted on the
unicycle and not touching anything else for support. This applies to offense,
defense, and during jump balls. As an exception to this rule, players may
jump off the unicycle for slam dunks and to block shots, as long as the
player is aware of where the unicycle will end up and that it will not cause
a safety hazard. If another player is fouled by the player that jumped or
gets hit by the abandoned unicycle, a flagrant foul will be called.

The player throwing the ball inbound must be mounted.

13.5 PLAYER OFF UNICYCLE If a player falls and loses the unicycle, the player
must try to get it out of the way as soon as possible if it can be done
without disrupting the flow of play. If that is not possible, then the player
must leave it where it lands until it can be retrieved without being
disruptive. A violation will result in a technical foul.

14.6 FOUR SECOND ZONE The three second zone becomes the four second zone.

15.7 INTENTIONAL PUSHING Intentional blind side pushes are considered flagrant
fouls. Two flagrant fouls by the same player disqualifies him for the rest of
that game. The referee must understand that often there is lots of shuffling
and pushing because more than one player is going for the ball or because it
gets crowded and the rider must look for balance. The referee must appreciate
if there is no foul, a regular foul, or a flagrant foul, just like he would
in a conventional game.

A player off his or her unicycle is considered off-side.

16.8 CONTACT OF THE BALL WITH THE UNICYCLE As long as the player is in contact
with the unicycle, riding or not, it is considered part of a player when a
ball bounces out of bounds off the unicycle. If this happens the other team
gets possession of the ball. A unicycle that is not touching it’s rider is
considered part of the court (for example if he had fallen). What team gets
possession will depends on what happened immediately prior to the ball
bouncing off the unicycle.

17.9 DRIBBLING A player who stops dribbling can, if motionless, twisting or
idling, keep the ball 5 seconds in hands before throwing it. A player who
receives the ball while progressing (pedaling) can make three idles before
dribbling or throwing. A player who catches the ball while motionless
(balancing, twisting or idling) can keep the ball 5 seconds in hands before
dribbling and progressing. A player shall not make a second dribble after
having completed a dribble, unless the ball, when it is out of the player’s
control, has touched another player, or the opponents’ basket or backboard,
or has been batted out of the player’s control by an opponent.


Stay on top, John Foss President, Unicycling Society of America Director,
International Unicycling Federation (reply to jfoss@unicycling.com)
http://www.unicycling.com

RE: Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X

> Are the basketball rules ready? I’d like to go ahead with translating to
> Japanese.

It’s not done yet, but I think it’s pretty close. Due to the time situation
and my own wedding situation, you might want to translate what we’ve got
now, and maybe do a supplement later as a handout to the riders who
participate at UNICON.

I don’t know the exact situation on those rules at the moment, but I know I
can’t get to it soon. Friday my company was hit by one of the
self-replicating Outlook virus-things, and today we’re rebuilding/replacing
all the files it ate…

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

“It’s never too early to be Friday” - John Foss

Re: Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X

On 15 Apr 2000, Alberto Ruiz wrote:

> After further review, our unanimous opinion in PR is that we stay with the 24"
> limitation. Already it is too busy underneath (in the 4 second area) with very
> little space to allow larger unis. The result will be more falls and will
> result in a more much dangerous game. I would like the feedback of Sem and
> other persons that has been practicing. Also, Rolf, how has unihockey
> addressed this problem?

Here’s what the IUF rules for hockey
(http://www.mpch-mainz.mpg.de/~sander/uni/iuf_03e.html) say about the unicycles:

“For international competitions, the maximum wheel size is 24”. The unicycles
must not have sharp or protruding parts anywhere which might cause injuries.
This refers especially to quick-release levers and bolts. The pedals must be
plastic or rubber."

I agree that it could be dangerous to allow larger wheels.

            Greetings Rolf



Re: Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X

----- Original Message ----- From: John Foss <john_foss@asinet.com> To: ‘Alberto
Ruiz’ <alberto@taino.net>; ‘Rolf Sander’ <sander@mpch-mainz.mpg.de>;
<unicycling@winternet.com> Sent: Tuesday, April 18, 2000 9:10 PM Subject: RE:
Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X

> > I believe that we can put the exact wording for basketball. Also, can you
> > organize this item and the others items in my previous posting with
> > numbering that will integrate the Rules of Basketball with the other IUF
> > Rules?
>
> This is what I came up with. I don’t think the items are in a sensible
order
> and would like other peoples’ comments on that. Also I kept one or two
items
> from the “bogus” basketball rules we had published in there before, mainly the
> part on dribbling.
>
> I also used the “suggested rewrite” versions I submitted the other day.
> Everybody please read and comment:
>
> ------------------------------------------------
I like it just as it is up to 9.7.
9.8 is good, except we have to add something as per Sem’s suggestion. We don’t
want somebody to dismount and throw his uni to deviate the ball.

10.9 I don’t have any problem with the content of 9.9, but I prefer that nothing
is written, so that we use whatever the International Rules say at the time
of the competition. For example, under some Rules, you have the 5 second
limitations only when the defensive player applies some pressure.

Thanks for a job well done.

Alberto Ruiz

>
> 9 UNICYCLE BASKETBALL
>
> INTERNATIONAL UNICYCLING FEDERATION GUIDELINES In IUF competition, unicycle
> basketball is played using the international rules for regular basketball with
> a few changes. The items below, in combination with standard international
> basketball rules, are what are
used
> for UNICON competition.
>
> 9.1 UNICYCLES For international competitions, the maximum wheel size is
> 24". The
unicycles
> must not have sharp or protruding parts anywhere which might cause
injuries.
> This refers especially to quick-release levers and bolts. The pedals must
be
> plastic or rubber.
>
> 9.2 STEPS AND TRAVELING The player is allowed two steps. A step is a half
> revolution of the wheel, meaning that each wheel revolution is the
> equivalent of two steps because pedaling with one leg only moves the wheel
> half a revolution. However, if
as
> a continuation of the play the ball is thrown or passed, an extra (third) half
> revolution is allowed. This extra step is the equivalent to the jump
in
> regular basketball.
>
> 9.3 IDLING Idling is equivalent to the pivot foot and therefore is allowed.
> Twisting, where the pedals stay at the same height, while you move the
> unicycle left and right is also considered your pivot foot, and therefore
> allowed. Doing both, (idling and twisting) before letting the ball go is not
> allowed and will be considered traveling. The player must also stay within a
> one meter radius from the point where the idling or twisting started.
>
> 9.4 PLAYER ON UNICYCLE The player can only play the ball while mounted on the
> unicycle and not touching anything else for support. This applies to
> offense, defense, and during jump balls. As an exception to this rule,
> players may jump off the unicycle for slam dunks and to block shots, as long
> as the player is aware of where the unicycle will end up and that it will
> not cause a safety hazard. If another player is fouled by the player that
> jumped or gets hit
by
> the abandoned unicycle, a flagrant foul will be called.
>
> The player throwing the ball inbound must be mounted.
>
> 9.5 PLAYER OFF UNICYCLE If a player falls and loses the unicycle, the player
> must try to get it
out
> of the way as soon as possible if it can be done without disrupting the
flow
> of play. If that is not possible, then the player must leave it where it lands
> until it can be retrieved without being disruptive. A violation will result in
> a technical foul.
>
> 9.6 FOUR SECOND ZONE The three second zone becomes the four second zone.
>
> 9.7 INTENTIONAL PUSHING Intentional blind side pushes are considered flagrant
> fouls. Two flagrant fouls by the same player disqualifies him for the rest
> of that game. The referee must understand that often there is lots of
> shuffling and pushing because more than one player is going for the ball or
> because it gets crowded and the rider must look for balance. The referee
> must appreciate
if
> there is no foul, a regular foul, or a flagrant foul, just like he would
in
> a conventional game.
>
> A player off his or her unicycle is considered off-side.
>
> 9.8 CONTACT OF THE BALL WITH THE UNICYCLE As long as the player is in contact
> with the unicycle, riding or not, it
is
> considered part of a player when a ball bounces out of bounds off the
> unicycle. If this happens the other team gets possession of the ball. A
> unicycle that is not touching it’s rider is considered part of the court (for
> example if he had fallen). What team gets possession will depends on what
> happened immediately prior to the ball bouncing off the unicycle.
>
> 9.9 DRIBBLING A player who stops dribbling can, if motionless, twisting or
> idling, keep the ball 5 seconds in hands before throwing it. A player who
> receives the ball while progressing (pedaling) can make three idles before
> dribbling or throwing. A player who catches the ball while motionless
> (balancing, twisting or idling) can keep the ball 5 seconds in hands before
> dribbling and progressing. A player shall not make a second dribble after
> having completed a dribble, unless the ball, when it is out of the player’s
> control, has touched
another
> player, or the opponents’ basket or backboard, or has been batted out of
the
> player’s control by an opponent.
>
> ------------------------------------------
>
> Stay on top, John Foss President, Unicycling Society of America Director,
> International Unicycling Federation (reply to jfoss@unicycling.com)
> http://www.unicycling.com

Re: Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X

Greetings

In message “RE: Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X”, John Foss wrote…

Are the basketball rules ready? I’d like to go ahead with translating to
Japanese.

>> I believe that we can put the exact wording for basketball. Also, can you
>> organize this item and the others items in my previous posting with
>> numbering that will integrate the Rules of Basketball with the other IUF
>> Rules?
>
>This is what I came up with. I don’t think the items are in a sensible order
>and would like other peoples’ comments on that. Also I kept one or two items
>from the “bogus” basketball rules we had published in there before, mainly the
>part on dribbling.
>
>I also used the “suggested rewrite” versions I submitted the other day.
>Everybody please read and comment:
>
>------------------------------------------------
>
>
>9 UNICYCLE BASKETBALL
>
>INTERNATIONAL UNICYCLING FEDERATION GUIDELINES In IUF competition, unicycle
>basketball is played using the international rules for regular basketball with
>a few changes. The items below, in combination with standard international
>basketball rules, are what are used for UNICON competition.
>
>9.1 UNICYCLES For international competitions, the maximum wheel size is 24".
> The unicycles must not have sharp or protruding parts anywhere which might
> cause injuries. This refers especially to quick-release levers and bolts.
> The pedals must be plastic or rubber.
>
>9.2 STEPS AND TRAVELING The player is allowed two steps. A step is a half
> revolution of the wheel, meaning that each wheel revolution is the
> equivalent of two steps because pedaling with one leg only moves the wheel
> half a revolution. However, if as a continuation of the play the ball is
> thrown or passed, an extra (third) half revolution is allowed. This extra
> step is the equivalent to the jump in regular basketball.
>
>9.3 IDLING Idling is equivalent to the pivot foot and therefore is allowed.
> Twisting, where the pedals stay at the same height, while you move the
> unicycle left and right is also considered your pivot foot, and therefore
> allowed. Doing both, (idling and twisting) before letting the ball go is not
> allowed and will be considered traveling. The player must also stay within a
> one meter radius from the point where the idling or twisting started.
>
>9.4 PLAYER ON UNICYCLE The player can only play the ball while mounted on the
> unicycle and not touching anything else for support. This applies to
> offense, defense, and during jump balls. As an exception to this rule,
> players may jump off the unicycle for slam dunks and to block shots, as long
> as the player is aware of where the unicycle will end up and that it will
> not cause a safety hazard. If another player is fouled by the player that
> jumped or gets hit by the abandoned unicycle, a flagrant foul will be
> called.
>
>The player throwing the ball inbound must be mounted.
>
>9.5 PLAYER OFF UNICYCLE If a player falls and loses the unicycle, the player
> must try to get it out of the way as soon as possible if it can be done
> without disrupting the flow of play. If that is not possible, then the
> player must leave it where it lands until it can be retrieved without being
> disruptive. A violation will result in a technical foul.
>
>9.6 FOUR SECOND ZONE The three second zone becomes the four second zone.
>
>9.7 INTENTIONAL PUSHING Intentional blind side pushes are considered flagrant
> fouls. Two flagrant fouls by the same player disqualifies him for the rest
> of that game. The referee must understand that often there is lots of
> shuffling and pushing because more than one player is going for the ball or
> because it gets crowded and the rider must look for balance. The referee
> must appreciate if there is no foul, a regular foul, or a flagrant foul,
> just like he would in a conventional game.
>
>A player off his or her unicycle is considered off-side.
>
>9.8 CONTACT OF THE BALL WITH THE UNICYCLE As long as the player is in contact
> with the unicycle, riding or not, it is considered part of a player when a
> ball bounces out of bounds off the unicycle. If this happens the other team
> gets possession of the ball. A unicycle that is not touching it’s rider is
> considered part of the court (for example if he had fallen). What team gets
> possession will depends on what happened immediately prior to the ball
> bouncing off the unicycle.
>
>9.9 DRIBBLING A player who stops dribbling can, if motionless, twisting or
> idling, keep the ball 5 seconds in hands before throwing it. A player who
> receives the ball while progressing (pedaling) can make three idles before
> dribbling or throwing. A player who catches the ball while motionless
> (balancing, twisting or idling) can keep the ball 5 seconds in hands before
> dribbling and progressing. A player shall not make a second dribble after
> having completed a dribble, unless the ball, when it is out of the player’s
> control, has touched another player, or the opponents’ basket or backboard,
> or has been batted out of the player’s control by an opponent.
>
>------------------------------------------
>
>Stay on top, John Foss President, Unicycling Society of America Director,
>International Unicycling Federation (reply to jfoss@unicycling.com)
>http://www.unicycling.com
>
>

Regards, Jack Halpern CJK Dictionary Publishing Society, http://www.kanji.org
Voice: +81-48-481-3103 Fax: +81-48-479-1323

Re: Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X

Greetings

In message “RE: Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X”, John Foss wrote…
>> Are the basketball rules ready? I’d like to go ahead with translating to
>> Japanese.
>
>It’s not done yet, but I think it’s pretty close. Due to the time situation
>and my own wedding situation, you might want to translate what we’ve got
>now, and maybe do a supplement later as a handout to the riders who
>participate at UNICON.

Could you please send me the current version? Yuuichiro has volunteered to
translate it.

>I don’t know the exact situation on those rules at the moment, but I know I
>can’t get to it soon. Friday my company was hit by one of the
>self-replicating Outlook virus-things, and today we’re rebuilding/replacing
>all the files it ate…

I spent a whole day recovering for the Love Bug. Fortunately, we believe in
three religions here: backup, backup, and backup :slight_smile:

>Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com
>
>“It’s never too early to be Friday” - John Foss
>
>

Regards, Jack Halpern CJK Dictionary Publishing Society, http://www.kanji.org
Voice: +81-48-481-3103 Fax: +81-48-479-1323

Re: Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X

----- Original Message ----- From: Jack Halpern <jack@mail.hinocatv.ne.jp> To:
John Foss <john_foss@asinet.com>
Cc: ‘Alberto Ruiz’ <alberto@taino.net>; ‘Rolf Sander’
<sander@mpch-mainz.mpg.de>; <unicycling@winternet.com> Sent: Friday, May 19,
2000 8:57 PM Subject: Re: Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X

> Greetings
>
> In message “RE: Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X”, John Foss wrote…
>
> Are the basketball rules ready? I’d like to go ahead with translating to
> Japanese.
>
I believe that Sem suggested some improvements that I accepted. Ask John for an
updated version. I will detail some of the changes that I remember. The size of
the basketball, of course, is the official size. Remember that the Rules of our
games are whatever the International Rules are at the time of the competition,
except for the following adjustments.
>
> >> I believe that we can put the exact wording for basketball. Also, can you
> >> organize this item and the others items in my previous posting with
> >> numbering that will integrate the Rules of Basketball with the other IUF
> >> Rules?
> >
> >This is what I came up with. I don’t think the items are in a sensible
order
> >and would like other peoples’ comments on that. Also I kept one or two
items
> >from the “bogus” basketball rules we had published in there before,
mainly
> >the part on dribbling.
> >
> >I also used the “suggested rewrite” versions I submitted the other day.
> >Everybody please read and comment:
> >
> >------------------------------------------------
> >
> >
> >9 UNICYCLE BASKETBALL
> >
> >INTERNATIONAL UNICYCLING FEDERATION GUIDELINES In IUF competition, unicycle
> >basketball is played using the
international
> >rules for regular basketball with a few changes. The items below, in
> >combination with standard international basketball rules, are what are
used
> >for UNICON competition.
> >
> >9.1 UNICYCLES For international competitions, the maximum wheel size is
> > 24". The
unicycles
> >must not have sharp or protruding parts anywhere which might cause
injuries.
> >This refers especially to quick-release levers and bolts. The pedals
must be
> >plastic or rubber.
> >
> >9.2 STEPS AND TRAVELING The player is allowed two steps. A step is a half
> > revolution of the
wheel,
> >meaning that each wheel revolution is the equivalent of two steps
because
> >pedaling with one leg only moves the wheel half a revolution. However,
if as
> >a continuation of the play the ball is thrown or passed, an extra
(third)
> >half revolution is allowed. This extra step is the equivalent to the
jump in
> >regular basketball.
> >
> >9.3 IDLING Idling is equivalent to the pivot foot and therefore is allowed.
Twisting,
> >where the pedals stay at the same height, while you move the unicycle
left
> >and right is also considered your pivot foot, and therefore allowed.
Doing
> >both, (idling and twisting) before letting the ball go is not allowed
and
> >will be considered traveling. The player must also stay within a one
meter
> >radius from the point where the idling or twisting started.
> >
Sem had suggested to allow both idling and twisting… Also the radius was .5
meter or 1 meter diameter.
> >9.4 PLAYER ON UNICYCLE The player can only play the ball while mounted on
> > the unicycle and not touching anything else for support. This applies to
> > offense, defense,
and
> >during jump balls. As an exception to this rule, players may jump off
the
> >unicycle for slam dunks and to block shots, as long as the player is
aware
> >of where the unicycle will end up and that it will not cause a safety
> >hazard. If another player is fouled by the player that jumped or gets
hit by
> >the abandoned unicycle, a flagrant foul will be called.
> >
> >The player throwing the ball inbound must be mounted.
> >
> >9.5 PLAYER OFF UNICYCLE If a player falls and loses the unicycle, the player
> > must try to get it
out
> >of the way as soon as possible if it can be done without disrupting the
flow
> >of play. If that is not possible, then the player must leave it where it
> >lands until it can be retrieved without being disruptive. A violation
will
> >result in a technical foul.

Sem had suggested that instead of a technical foul, there should be an
obstruction call. I am not sure of what the penalty be for an obstruction call.

> >
> >9.6 FOUR SECOND ZONE The three second zone becomes the four second zone.
> >
> >9.7 INTENTIONAL PUSHING Intentional blind side pushes are considered
> > flagrant fouls. Two
flagrant
> >fouls by the same player disqualifies him for the rest of that game. The
> >referee must understand that often there is lots of shuffling and
pushing
> >because more than one player is going for the ball or because it gets
> >crowded and the rider must look for balance. The referee must appreciate
if
> >there is no foul, a regular foul, or a flagrant foul, just like he would
in
> >a conventional game.
> >
> >A player off his or her unicycle is considered off-side.
> >
> >9.8 CONTACT OF THE BALL WITH THE UNICYCLE As long as the player is in
> > contact with the unicycle, riding or not, it
is
> >considered part of a player when a ball bounces out of bounds off the
> >unicycle. If this happens the other team gets possession of the ball. A
> >unicycle that is not touching it’s rider is considered part of the court
> >(for example if he had fallen). What team gets possession will depends
on
> >what happened immediately prior to the ball bouncing off the unicycle.

A unicycle is never part of the floor. It is considered part of the rider, even
when he is not mounted, if that rider is playing at that time.

> >
> >9.9 DRIBBLING A player who stops dribbling can, if motionless, twisting or
> > idling,
keep
> >the ball 5 seconds in hands before throwing it. A player who receives the
> >ball while progressing (pedaling) can make
three
> >idles before dribbling or throwing. A player who catches the ball while
> >motionless (balancing, twisting or idling) can keep the ball 5 seconds in
> >hands before dribbling and progressing. A player shall not make a second
> >dribble after having completed a
dribble,
> >unless the ball, when it is out of the player’s control, has touched
another
> >player, or the opponents’ basket or backboard, or has been batted out of
the
> >player’s control by an opponent.

We were getting rid of this section altogether. It has already been established
above how dribbling will vary from the regular basketball rules of dribbling.

Sem had a couplre of other suggestions. One had to do with, if a basket is
scored by a person that jumped from his unicycle and had a foul assesed for so
doing Is the basket allowed?

Also, Sem wanted to clarify that the usual shoving below the basket because of
conflicting idling space should not imply that there is more contact than
regular basket. Actually, less should be allowed.
> >
> >------------------------------------------
> >
Alberto Ruiz
>

Re: Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X

----- Original Message ----- From: Rolf Sander <sander@mpch-mainz.mpg.de> To:
<unicycling@winternet.com> Sent: Monday, April 17, 2000 10:48 AM Subject: Re:
Size of UNI. Basketball at UNICON X

Thanks Rolf! John: I believe that we can put the exact wording for
basketball. Also, can you organize this item and the others items in my
previous posting with numbering that will integrate the Rules of Basketball
with the other IUF Rules?

Alberto Ruiz

> On 15 Apr 2000, Alberto Ruiz wrote:
>
> > After further review, our unanimous opinion in PR is that we stay with
the
> > 24" limitation. Already it is too busy underneath (in the 4 second area)
> > with very little space to allow larger unis. The result will be more
falls
> > and will result in a more much dangerous game. I would like the feedback of
> > Sem and other persons that has been
practicing.
> > Also, Rolf, how has unihockey addressed this problem?
>
> Here’s what the IUF rules for hockey
> (http://www.mpch-mainz.mpg.de/~sander/uni/iuf_03e.html) say about the
> unicycles:
>
> “For international competitions, the maximum wheel size is 24”. The unicycles
> must not have sharp or protruding parts anywhere which might cause injuries.
> This refers especially to quick-release levers and bolts. The pedals must be
> plastic or rubber."
>
> I agree that it could be dangerous to allow larger wheels.
>
> Greetings Rolf
> –
> ***********************************************************************
> * Rolf Sander * phone: [+49] 6131/305-449 *
> * Air Chemistry Department * fax: [+49] 6131/305-436 *
> * Max-Planck Institute of Chemistry * email: sander@mpch-mainz.mpg.de *
> * PO Box 3060, 55020 Mainz, Germany * www.mpch-mainz.mpg.de/~sander/ *
> ***********************************************************************
>
>