Shoulder protection

Hi all

After a recent injury, which is proving to be quite severe. I now have a
lifetime lump on my shoulder from a permanently shifted collar bone, as well
as maybe 3 months of recovery to do. So I wonder if anyone here uses or has
given thought to shoulder protection.

When I work on stilts I always wear knee protection. This is because the
knees are very easily shattered in a stilt fall, and people falling off
stilts very often fall on their knees. I am thinking that there might be a
similar phenomenon in uni falls, with people mainly falling onto their upper
bodies/shoulders?

My experience, limited though it is, of Muni and trials, but in particular
most off road stuff, is that a great deal of falls happen when travelling at
speed, and the wheel gets stuck or slowed suddenly for any reason, I.e. a
unseen rock or shallow depression, and the resulting upd is similar to a
Bicycle crash involving hitting the front brake to hard at speed and getting
pitched over the front handlebars (Did this not happen to everyone, at least
as a kid?) the crash causes you to be pitched off forwards and down. Most
anyone will tuck their head out of instinct and usually roll to one side or
another. Often this results in a nice natural breakfall, but if gravity is
too fast then the person lands hard on the upper body, usually a shoulder.
This is exactly what happened to me, I am pretty good at breakfalls and
usually roll out of most anything safety but on this occasion simply could
not act fast enough and landed fully on the top of the shoulder.

Is this a fairly normal scenario? Or just my own dumb luck. If it is normal
then I would suggest that shoulder protection might be at least as important
as any other, with the possible exception of helmets. And that some research
into suitable armour might be useful.

I would be very happy to test any armour anyone suggests and give my views
I will certainly be looking into it myself for when I am healed up
enough to get back on the saddle.

Regards

David Straitjacket
www.straitjacketcircus.co.uk

In article <u77vn19uoltmc3@corp.supernews.com>,
David Straitjacket <david@DELETETHISstraitjacketcircus.co.uk> wrote:
)
)When I work on stilts I always wear knee protection. This is because the
)knees are very easily shattered in a stilt fall, and people falling off
)stilts very often fall on their knees. I am thinking that there might be a
)similar phenomenon in uni falls, with people mainly falling onto their upper
)bodies/shoulders?
)…
)Is this a fairly normal scenario?

It’s pretty normal. I’ve gone down really hard on my shoulder playing
uni basketball, and I’ve seen other guys do the same thing. It’s pretty
easy when you’re moving at any kind of speed; you hit an impediment (like
a uni that just shot out from under someone), and when you try to get
your foot off the pedal to catch yourself, it gets tangled up in something,
and you get catapulted off.

Some serious BMX guys wear shoulder armor, especially if they’re doing
half-pipe (which is about the craziest thing I’ve seen).
-Tom

Sholder armour would be great! -but not full chest stuff- just something to cap the shoulder and wraping around back. UPD’s that can’t be ran out frequently end with me extending my hand and guiding myself into a roll over the sholder- almost always the right side, since this is usualy away from traffic.

Christopher

Re: Shoulder protection

Kris Holm did that in Universe, jumping from one rock to another. He overshot
the second rock and pretty much landed on his head, it looked like. Ouch. He
walked away from it though.

David Straitjacket wrote:

> You are probably lucky that you didn’t. Due to the angle of fall you may
> well have caused serious back injury, and perhaps even resulting paralysis.
> The ‘over the handlebar’ type fall that I think this kind of upd mimics is
> known for causing those types of injuries in mountain bikers and road
> racers. Because you are coming down at an angle you will tend to land on
> your chest rather than your stomach, your legs are meanwhile still in the
> air and going forwards. Result, the legs are carried by their own weight and
> momentum over your head and back/neck injuries are caused. Very nasty.
> Whatever you do, stick to rolling over your shoulder, it will save you 99%
> of the time.

Re: Shoulder protection

“David Straitjacket” <david@DELETETHISstraitjacketcircus.co.uk> wrote in
message news:u77vn19uoltmc3@corp.supernews.com
> Did this not happen to everyone, at least
> as a kid?

Yes. The “best” incident was when I was playing bike polo
with a long straight piece of very thick wire (we lived opposite
a wire factory). It wasn’t long before it got caught in my front
wheel, shredded most of the spokes and wrapped itself around
the hub. I went flying, of course, and I never played bike polo
again.

Arnold the Aardvark

Re: Shoulder protection

“David Straitjacket” <david@DELETETHISstraitjacketcircus.co.uk> wrote in message news:<u77vn19uoltmc3@corp.supernews.com>…
> Hi all
<snip>
> I would be very happy to test any armour anyone suggests and give my views
> :slight_smile: I will certainly be looking into it myself for when I am healed up
> enough to get back on the saddle.

Most of the shoulder armour I have seen (Dainese is the most common
I’ve seen, but that’s probably because that’s what my main cycle shop
has) would protect the shoulder from something like a graze, cut or
sudden impact against a stone (surface protection more or less).
However from what you’re saying about your accident, it sounds like
your injury was caused by much of your body weight pulling your
ligaments to their limit and slightly beyond. I don’t think the kind
of armour that is available would have prevented this, although it may
have lessened localised bruising etc.

Now don’t take this bit personally, but think of your body as a lump
of modelling clay (your fleshy bits) wrapped around a glass ball (your
skeleton). If you wrap this up in some protection, say a layer of foam
covered by a layer of hard plastic (like most cycle armour) and then
drop it from a few feet onto a hard surface. Remove the protection and
you will see that the surface of the clay lump hasn’t had much damage,
but slice the clay in two and you’ll see that the glass ball has moved
within clay and that the overall shape of the lump has changed. That
is more or less what happens to a body that runs into something
immovable (your body tends to spring back into place, unless you’ve
really hurt yourself). Short of having an enormouse layer of padding
to decellerate your body much more gradually, then there is not much
that armour can do to prevent this sort of injury.

That said, if you wear this stuff under a shirt, then you’re less
likely to get hassle from idiots. They’ll think you’re built like a
truck!

Have fun! (and mend soon)

Graeme

(above email is defunct, try graemeATgpdodsDOTcom, anti-spam address,
you know what to do)

Re: Shoulder protection

Graeme said…

^I don’t think the kind
> of armour that is available would have prevented this, although it may
> have lessened localised bruising etc…
> …Short of having an enormouse layer of padding
> to decellerate your body much more gradually, then there is not much
> that armour can do to prevent this sort of injury.^

My own understanding of the way armour works is different from what you are
suggesting here. The compressed foam and hard shell do provide a layer of
initial impact protection put the real function is one of distribution of
impact force. I landed on an area of my shoulder about 1-2 inches square.
Result, a lot of force in a very small area. Armour would have distributed
that impact over the whole area, and should have resulted in a lessened
injury. This is backed up with my own experience with kneepads as
stiltwalking armour. Falls to the knees (while training!) that would have
caused nasty injuries if on unprotected joints have proved to be completely
painless while wearing basic bmx kneepads with some compressed foam and a
plastic shell. Haven’t seen the dianese armour up close though so I may be
wrong about its design.

‘> That said, if you wear this stuff under a shirt, then you’re less
> likely to get hassle from idiots. They’ll think you’re built like a
> truck!’

I used to ride a motorbike and wore a huge Kevlar armoured jacket. With the
big boots and the bike trousers this had the overall effect of making me
look huge, wrestler huge. Some of my friends took to calling me Robocop and
people used to get out of my way all the time. It was a lot of fun walking
down the street in Manchester!

Regards

David Straitjacket
www.straitjacketcircus.co.uk

Re: Shoulder protection

“David Straitjacket” <david@DELETETHISstraitjacketcircus.co.uk> wrote in message news:<u79uoe163gd123@corp.supernews.com>…
<snip>
> My own understanding of the way armour works is different from what you are
> suggesting here. The compressed foam and hard shell do provide a layer of
> initial impact protection put the real function is one of distribution of
> impact force. I landed on an area of my shoulder about 1-2 inches square.
> Result, a lot of force in a very small area. Armour would have distributed
> that impact over the whole area, and should have resulted in a lessened
> injury. This is backed up with my own experience with kneepads as
> stiltwalking armour.
<snip>
It sounds like your understanding of the way armour works is the same
as mine. I think I’d just misunderstood your injury, I thought it had
gone beyond a mainly surface impact type injury to a much deeper
“structural” injury. If a force is large enough, even if distributed
by the armour, it could still cause deep tissue injuries. I’m sure a
medical type person could explain it better, and it would probably
involve phrases such as “blunt trauma”, “contusions” and “take two
aspirin and call me in a couple of days” (or at least that’s what they
always say on TV :slight_smile:

Have fun!

Graeme

Re: Shoulder protection

Hi. I tried to reply to you directly to take this thread off the newsgroup
(i suspect it is getting off topic). My emails kept bouncing so here it
is…

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
^^^^^^^^^^

Hi Graeme

I think the thread is getting a little off topic (maybe) so I thought that I
would reply directly, hope that is ok.

The injury I sustained is a deep structural injury, indeed I now have a
collar bone which sits an inch higher on my shoulder than it did before,
leaving me with permanent lump once the ligaments have healed. My feeling is
that armour would have prevented it because the injury was caused by a very
localised impact to the top and end of my collarbone, which was then forced
in and up tearing the ligaments as it went, therefore it ‘feels’ as though
distributing the force would have avoided most or all of the injury.

However, you may well be right in your assertion, all this is just theory
after all and I do have a history of getting these kind of things wrong in
many painful ways. So, all we need to work out now is who are we going to
test both the theory’s on?

Regards.

David

hey lumpy

i know exacly what you are talking about,david

i have the shoulder lump aswell,and 3 days ago i landed upside down and cracked it again.

it gonna be bigger know,but it held-up.the first shot to the pave was 7 years ago on a mtn.bike.

“that which does not kill you makes you stronger”

Re: Shoulder protection

Dammit…

Now there are two of us lacking in shoulder symmetry!

May you heal up fast… :slight_smile:

David

Armor

New short cranks for Coker, $25.

New armor for antisipated increase in speed, $150.

Looks fairly light- only ridged material is over the points- no bulky crap around the chest or sholders.

Christopher

Re: Shoulder protection

LOL @ Harperproof!!!

Looks very nice…

Question is, what is the armour called? I need to look for a UK supplier.

Regards…

David Straitjacket

Check out:

Pressure Suit

And order direct… unfortuneatly, I can’t find any UK suppliers- though I’m sure there are; try anyone who sells 661 products- or ask Roger if he has a distibuter that can get him one…

I’ll keep looking,

Christopher

First UK source I found:

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/categories.asp?category=Body+Armour

Good luck (and look cool).

Christopher

Re: Shoulder protection

Many thanks indeed for your help. I think one of those will be coming my way
for the summertime.

New line Roger? I am sure many uk uni’ers will be interested.

Happy riding

David

Re: Shoulder protection

Yes we do sell axo and 661 now, so I will get what you want.

Roger


The UK’s Unicycle Source


----- Original Message -----
From: “rhysling” <rhysling.p23c@timelimit.unicyclist.com>
Newsgroups: rec.sport.unicycling
To: <rsu@unicycling.org>
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2002 6:04 PM
Subject: Re: Shoulder protection

>
> Check out:
>
> ‘Pressure Suit’ (http://www.axocycling.com)
>
> And order direct… unfortuneatly, I can’t find any UK suppliers- though
> I’m sure there are; try anyone who sells 661 products- or ask Roger if
> he has a distibuter that can get him one…
>
> I’ll keep looking,
>
> Christopher
>
>
> –
> rhysling - Last of the Mississippi Unicyclists
>
> “I think he uses a spell wrecker.” -Greg Harper, Antique Unicyclist
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> rhysling’s Profile: http://www.unicyclist.com/profile/411
> View this thread: http://www.unicyclist.com/thread/16496
>
>


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