seats, knees, and learning in reverse

hola boys and girls, it’s that time again, for everyones favorite whiney bitch on one wheel to talk, rant, question, and generally bore everyone :slight_smile:

I’ve had 3 days off college this week, and decided to make the most of them, by putting in a lot of practice in the park (maybe 10 hours) and to start with i came along quite well. i went from getting about 20-30ft average up to 150-170ft average. but i seem to have hit a wall.

yesterday i was averaging 150ft, so i assumed that with practice today, i’d be able to ride pretty much indefinately, however i seemed to have gotten WORSE with practice. today i was lucky to get 70ft. i dont know how, or why, i just know it wasn’t going well. it was as if everything i’d learnt suddenly dropped out of my head, and what i’d come to terms with, has suddenly become another mountain to climb.

also, i think my uni’s set up wrong, in terms to seat hight. everywhere i’ve read it’s said ‘nearly a full leg extention’, which, to be honest is a bit ambiguous. i think it may be stopping me. i’ve been playing with the seat hight. if i moved it a bit higher, it’d be easier on my knees, but i wouldnt go as far, whereas, if it were lower, i could go further, but it was a real strain on my knees.

it’d be like i’d have to tense all the muscles in my knees to control the riding, so keep at a pace i could control, and i’d have to stop because my legs would get really tired, really quickly

if anyone could point me in the right direction of my seat predicament i’d really appriciate it.

Cheers Matt

Hey,

It sounds like you’re thinking about it too much. Setting goals is good but there should be a point where they can be overlooked. It doesn’t sound like technique is an issue. Sometimes you just have bad days. I’ve always felt that even if you aren’t seeing an improvement as far as distance you’re still gaining experience.

As for the seat height, I think things work best when your leg is almost fully extended at the bottom. About the same amount of bend in your knees as when you’re standing, without locked knees. Seat height is kind of a preference thing though. You could probably learn to ride with any seat height.

Good luck,

AM

Hello Matt !

Dreddy_Matt wrote:

> hola boys and girls, it’s that time again, for everyones favorite
> whiney bitch on one wheel to talk, rant, question, and generally bore
> everyone
>
> I’ve had 3 days off college this week, and decided to make the most of
> them, by putting in a lot of practice in the park (maybe 10 hours) and
> to start with i came along quite well. i went from getting about 20-30ft
> average up to 150-170ft average. but i seem to have hit a wall.

The very same thing happened to me. Don’t know why already but I kept
riding and everything became ok. I took me a couple of sessions though to
get a good feeling again. Don’t give up !!!

>
>
> yesterday i was averaging 150ft, so i assumed that with practice today,
> i’d be able to ride pretty much indefinately, however i seemed to have
> gotten WORSE with practice. today i was lucky to get 70ft. i dont know
> how, or why, i just know it wasn’t going well. it was as if everything
> i’d learnt suddenly dropped out of my head, and what i’d come to terms
> with, has suddenly become another mountain to climb.
>
> also, i think my uni’s set up wrong, in terms to seat hight. everywhere
> i’ve read it’s said ‘nearly a full leg extention’, which, to be honest
> is a bit ambiguous. i think it may be stopping me. i’ve been playing
> with the seat hight. if i moved it a bit higher, it’d be easier on my
> knees, but i wouldnt go as far, whereas, if it were lower, i could go
> further, but it was a real strain on my knees.

A good trick to set the seat height is to sit on the uni while holding a
wall or the like. Place your right pedal down (lowest point) then your
right heel should touch the pedal while your leg is in full extension. The
left foot must not be on the pedal but rather hanging (so that your body
remains vertical). When you’ll pedal, though, you’ll feel that your leg
does not straighten that much but it is correct.

>

>
>
> it’d be like i’d have to tense all the muscles in my knees to control
> the riding, so keep at a pace i could control, and i’d have to stop
> because my legs would get really tired, really quickly

At first, I had a hard time riding 1000 ft because my legs got tired (even
if I do mtn bike races…). It will disappear with time and technique.
Remeber to stay relaxed while riding and to put weight on the saddle
rather than on the pedals.

Good luck !

>
>
> if anyone could point me in the right direction of my seat predicament
> i’d really appriciate it.
>
> Cheers Matt
>
> –
> Dreddy_Matt Posted via the Unicyclist Community -
> http://unicyclist.com/forums

In article <a248ub$413$1@laurel.tc.umn.edu>, Dreddy_Matt
<forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote: )hola boys and girls, it’s that time
again, for everyones favorite )whiney bitch on one wheel to talk, rant,
question, and generally bore )everyone :slight_smile: ) )I’ve had 3 days off college
this week, and decided to make the most of )them, by putting in a lot of
practice in the park (maybe 10 hours) and )to start with i came along
quite well. i went from getting about 20-30ft )average up to 150-170ft
average. but i seem to have hit a wall. ) )yesterday i was averaging
150ft, so i assumed that with practice today, )i’d be able to ride pretty
much indefinately, however i seemed to have )gotten WORSE with practice.
today i was lucky to get 70ft. i dont know )how, or why, i just know it
wasn’t going well. it was as if everything )i’d learnt suddenly dropped
out of my head, and what i’d come to terms )with, has suddenly become
another mountain to climb.

Learning isn’t linear. You’ll often have what feels like a setback, and
other times you’ll start a session and suddenly be able to do much more
than you could at the end of the last session. Just have patience and work
through the lulls.

)also, i think my uni’s set up wrong, in terms to seat hight. everywhere
)i’ve read it’s said ‘nearly a full leg extention’, which, to be honest
)is a bit ambiguous. i think it may be stopping me. i’ve been playing
)with the seat hight. if i moved it a bit higher, it’d be easier on my
)knees, but i wouldnt go as far, whereas, if it were lower, i could go
)further, but it was a real strain on my knees.

The higher position is probably closer to correct. I started out with my
seat about an inch too low (even after reading all the advice), and when I
adjusted it I had to unlearn some habits I’d picked up. -Tom

Hi Matt,

Seat height does make a difference especially while learning. With a
higher seat it makes you put more weight on the saddle thus taking some
off your legs. This leaves them with more power to control the wheel and
not supporting body weight. I’d say that this arrangement is better for
learning. Perhaps your experiments with a higher seat were real close but
just slightly too high - fractions of an inch made all the difference to
me when starting out.

Another thing to watch out for is the seat post being slightly twisted to
one side as that’ll throw your balance. I notice a twisted seat by the
fact my upper body itself twists round (further than the seat is usually)
in the direction of the seat - just to go straight(ish).

Keep plugging away is probably the best advice - some days are good while
others… I have had several bruised toes from kicking poor, defenceless
inanimate objects :wink:

Cheers, Neil

-----Original Message----- From: rsu-admin@unicycling.org
[On"]mailto:rsu-admin@unicycling.org]On Behalf Of Dreddy_Matt Sent: 16
January 2002 16:15 To: rsu@unicycling.org Subject: seats, knees, and
learning in reverse

hola boys and girls, it’s that time again, for everyones favorite whiney
bitch on one wheel to talk, rant, question, and generally bore everyone :slight_smile:

I’ve had 3 days off college this week, and decided to make the most of
them, by putting in a lot of practice in the park (maybe 10 hours) and to
start with i came along quite well. i went from getting about 20-30ft
average up to 150-170ft average. but i seem to have hit a wall.

yesterday i was averaging 150ft, so i assumed that with practice today,
i’d be able to ride pretty much indefinately, however i seemed to have
gotten WORSE with practice. today i was lucky to get 70ft. i dont know
how, or why, i just know it wasn’t going well. it was as if everything i’d
learnt suddenly dropped out of my head, and what i’d come to terms with,
has suddenly become another mountain to climb.

also, i think my uni’s set up wrong, in terms to seat hight. everywhere
i’ve read it’s said ‘nearly a full leg extention’, which, to be honest is
a bit ambiguous. i think it may be stopping me. i’ve been playing with the
seat hight. if i moved it a bit higher, it’d be easier on my knees, but i
wouldnt go as far, whereas, if it were lower, i could go further, but it
was a real strain on my knees.

it’d be like i’d have to tense all the muscles in my knees to control the
riding, so keep at a pace i could control, and i’d have to stop because my
legs would get really tired, really quickly

if anyone could point me in the right direction of my seat predicament i’d
really appriciate it.

Cheers Matt


Dreddy_Matt Posted via the Unicyclist Community -
http://unicyclist.com/forums
_________________________________________________________________________-
__
rec.sport.unicycling mailing list -
www.unicycling.org/mailman/listinfo/rsu

> it’d be like i’d have to tense all the muscles in my knees to control
> the riding, so keep at a pace i could control, and i’d have to stop
> because my legs would get really tired, really quickly

This means you are not sitting down. It does not mean necessarily that
your saddle is too low, but this is usually the case in people learning.
If your legs are getting tired from rides of only a few hundred feet, you
are using much more force than you need to. Try to keep your weight on the
seat and only use as much input to the pedals as you need to keep the
wheel under you. This will take time, and especially with adult learners
you will probably have to keep reminding yourself to do this.

Practicing when tired will deteriorate your learning process. Sometimes
you just need to give it a rest and come back later. You’ll get it. Just
keep on riding!

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“455 newsgroup messages in a year is only 1.24 per day…” - John Foss,
trying to explain to his wife