Seat height advice needed

Sorry if this is a redux, but I couldn’t quite find the answer I was looking for when I searched the forums.

I’ve been told that ideally, the lower leg should be almost straight at its lowest point. Indeed, I find this to be a very efficient way of riding long distances.

However, I’m trying to learn to ride off curbs, and this makes it quite difficult to get off my seat. In another post, someone mentioned that a lower seat is good for trials unicycling. What about general street riding? Will I just have to learn to ride off curbs like this, or is it actually better to be able to ride with a low seat for versatility, etc?

Thanks

Re: Seat height advice needed

In article <asqlerth.m34ry@timelimit.unicyclist.com>,
asqlerth <asqlerth.m34ry@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:
)
)I’ve been told that ideally, the lower leg should be almost straight at
)its lowest point. Indeed, I find this to be a very efficient way of
)riding long distances.
)
)However, I’m trying to learn to ride off curbs, and this makes it quite
)difficult to get off my seat. In another post, someone mentioned that a
)lower seat is good for trials unicycling. What about general street
)riding? Will I just have to learn to ride off curbs like this, or is it
)actually better to be able to ride with a low seat for versatility, etc?

For general street riding, I definitely would recommend keeping the seat
where you have it. You’ll figure out how to get off the seat; remember
that for maybe 80% of the pedal stroke your feet aren’t at the bottom.

You could start by lining up your pedals so they’re horizontal at the point
where you’ll go off the curb, and back up to try it a few times. Once
you get the hang of it, it will be easy to go off curbs with your seat
high.
-Tom

I always kept my seat high for street riding. I only started lowering my seats when I got into lots of MUni.

When riding off curbs, you don’t need to pull out the seat or anything. Just make sure you’re not landing with one pedal straight down. It’s usually easy enough to adjust your line toward a curb so that you can ride off and land with pedals level or nearly so. This gets easy without too much practice.

You can either freeze the wheel while you’re in the air, or just keep on rolling as you go (my preferred method), making sure you land with your pedals in a good way.

This pedal-lining-up method can also be used for hopping up curbs. If you squiggle, curve, or otherwise adjust your path toward the curb, you can arrive with your pedals where you want them, and jump right up.

yesterday i lowered my trials seat to it lowest setting before it hit the tyre, and you wouldn’t believe the diference it makes to rolling jumps, i think i’m going to experiment with lower as soon as i get arround to shortening my seatpost.

Sorry if it’s a little off topic, but in the 24hr I noticed that when I had the seat up high I couldn’t climb hills as well. It was at the height you described for general street riding and up the steep hills I couldn’t get enough power. I need to bob up and down on the steep stuff to get power…is this normal?

Andrew

Re: Seat height advice needed

On Fri, 18 Apr 2003 18:10:51 -0500, andrew_carter
<andrew_carter.m3tjo@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>Sorry if it’s a little off topic
I don’t think it is.

>but in the 24hr I noticed that when I
>had the seat up high I couldn’t climb hills as well. It was at the
>height you described for general street riding and up the steep hills I
>couldn’t get enough power. I need to bob up and down on the steep stuff
>to get power…is this normal?
I don’t know if it’s normal but I read most that a higher seat helps
with climbing. It has been my experience too. With a low seat I too
have to “bob up and down” for steep riding up, rather than remaining
seated. Or, maybe, I have to stand up on the pedals to get more power,
and the bobbing up and down is a logical consequence.

Klaas Bil - Newsgroup Addict

“First things first, but not necessarily in that order.”