Safety gear: kneepads

Hi,

after all this discussion and my bad experience last evening I’m thinking about
buying some kneepads. I’ve been in a sports shop after lunch, but I wasn’t sure
what to buy. There are cheap inline skater kneepads (as well as expensive
ones), but they seem to be somehow clumsy. On the other hand they are worn by
skaters who do amazing things while wearing them. I thought about indoor pads,
but they aren’t easy to fix and might be damaged quite fast. So, what are you
(those using already kneepads) using? I’m not so much interested in brands, but
mainly in type.

lars


Lars Burgstahler Institute of Communication Networks and Computer Engineering
University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 47, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany Tel: (+49)
711 685 7966 Fax: (+49) 711 685 7983 E-Mail: burgstahler@ind.uni-stuttgart.de

When was the last time you were flabbergasted? CIRCOMIQUE

RE: Safety gear: kneepads

> So, what are you (those using already kneepads) using? I’m not so much
> interested in brands, but mainly in type.

As with anything you wear on your body, brand is irrelevant (unless you’re a
victim of the fashion game; which my friends know I’m not!)

The type of pad you should use depends on the type of falling you do, and
surfaces you’re riding on. For rocks and offroad situations, a hard kneepad is
recommended. For indoors or less “punishing” activities, you can use something
less cumbersome. But this should depend on how much falling you do as well. When
learning new things, protect yourself and you can learn more, because you won’t
be waiting for stuff to heal half the time.

Brett Bymaster wears hard platic rollerblading (don’t know the brand) kneepads.
He’s still Bloodman, but not as much as in the early days. I wear a pair of
cheap basketball/volleyball pads. I expose myself to less danger when I ride
(something to do with being over 30, Bruce Bundy and George Peck excepted), and
would rather avoid falling and not attempt certain trail features. Brett is more
willing to try stuff, so he protects himself accordingly. I will admit that my
pads are “Bike” brand. Not my choice, but that’s what the store had when I
bought them. I drew a red circle with a line thru it over the brand name, making
for some nice uni pads. I made up five sets of these for the USA Team that went
to China in 1993 and I’m still wearing mine. Guess it’s time for a fresh pair…

Probably the most important factor of safety equipment is that it be
comfortable. If you can’t stand wearing it you probably won’t, and it’s money
wasted and you still unprotected. You might have to try several things to find
what works for you.

You can see lots of examples of the stuff people wear by looking at MUni Weekend
riders. Click on the small images to see the big ones:
http://www.unicycling.com/unifoss/muni/muni98sat.htm

Stay on top,

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

Re: Safety gear: kneepads

Lars Burgstahler <burgstah@ind.uni-stuttgart.de> writes:

> after all this discussion and my bad experience last evening I’m thinking
> about buying some kneepads.

I hate my kneepads. They have two wide (~2 inch) padded non-elastic velcro
straps that meet and attach behind the leg. These straps often team up and pinch
me. They were the cheapest kneepads I could find, but I haven’t found anything
better for sale at any price.

I’ve fallen on them a couple times, and though there’s no hard plastic, just
padding, they’ve protected my knees pretty well. They do sometimes tend to slip
down my leg though. It’s hard to get a good fit without elastic.

A friend of mine has fantastic kneepads that he let me borrow once.

They have a padded front with hard plastic shields over the critical area.
Around the back there’s a wide elastic webbing, the same width (or height, as
you’re wearing them while standing) as the padded front. In addition, there
are two narrow (~1 inch) elastic bands that go around the leg and velcro to
the front.

Having both the webbing and the straps is nice. The webbing doesn’t pinch,
and the straps let you ignore the webbing and slap them on over pants if
you want to.

If I could find something like this for sale, I would buy them. I admit I
haven’t looked very hard; I just checked local skate shops.

Re: Safety gear: kneepads

Lars Burgstahler (burgstah@ind.uni-stuttgart.de) wrote:

: after all this discussion and my bad experience last evening I’m thinking
: about buying some kneepads. I’ve been in a sports shop after lunch, but I
: wasn’t sure what to buy. So, what are you (those using already kneepads)
: using? I’m not so much interested in brands, but mainly in type.

I use volley ball pads, soft and elasticated, they move with my knees and give a
fair bit of protection during face plants. I tried riding in skater pads to
start with for Muni but found them V sweaty and they rubbed uncomfortably.
Volley pads wash well too, just as well with my attraction to mud.

See you at the BMW Sarah

Re: Safety gear: kneepads

Hello! I wear knee pads designed for volleyball players…so far I haven’t had
to test them, but I just feel better with them on!