Saddle height

Hi guys,

I’ve just recently got myself one of these one-wheeled instruments of
destruction and am having loads of fun learning how not to fall off. One
thing I’m a bit curious about, though, is how high to set the saddle - mine’s
adjustable (a DM Ringmaster). With bikes they usually say you should have
your leg just slightly bent when the pedal’s at the lowest point. Is this
also best with a uni? I found it a lot harder to get on with the saddle that
high. What does anybody think?

Thanks, Jeremy.


o-------------------------------------------------------------o
| Jeremy Kirkwood | Whither atrophy? | All my own work |
| Inmos Ltd, Bristol | Eschew obfuscation! | jpk@inmos.co.uk |
o-------------------------------------------------------------o

Re: Saddle height

Jeremy,

IMHO, I think that the height of the saddle depends on exactly what you are
going to be doing. If you wish to ride long distance, put the seat high enough
to get full extension of your leg when it is at the lowest point. If the seat is
too low when riding distance, you may end up with knee problems. Be careful not
to put it too high, so that your hips are rocking side to side in order to reach
the pedals on the bottom, this could result in other problems.

If you are going to be doing any artistic riding, I usually prefer the seat just
a little lower - 1-2 inches. Having the seat lower will make some of the skills
easier to learn.

If you are going to be unicycling cross country, (overr hills, over rocks,
etc.), I would put the seat at about the same height that I practice artistic.
(I also let some of the air out of my tire when I go cross country.)

As far as having more difficulty getting on when the seat is at its proper
height, this is something that a little practice will quickly overcome.
Good luck!!.

Constance*


Constance Cotter cotter@cae.wisc.edu Unicon VII Director The 7th International
Unicycle Sports Convention August 2 to August 7, 1994

Address: Unicon VII; P.O Box 131404; St. Paul, MN 55113-0012
(612) 788-9137 phone; (612) 631-9270 fax