riding in the snow

We saw our first significant snow of the season on my campus today, and it
made me wonder what insight people might have to help sucessfully unicycle
through the snow.

I can tell now, more than ever that I need to master the rolling mount. I can
generally freemount where the ground is flat, and the snow not very deep.

Idling was definately interesting – I am very much slipping at any change of
direction. I do well so long as I make it as slow an idle as I can without
loosing balance.

I’ve ridden over a few ice patches, but tend to fall off if I don’t spot the ice
until I’m over it.

I’ve been thinking about putting together a chain for my wheel. Any suggestions
about what the best way to do whis is, or how much I could stand to benefit
from doing so?

Well, I was very disappointed that I could not easily work on my mountain
unicycling skills when the winter weather started, but now that there’s snow
on the ground, I can see I’ll be building plenty of new skills just by
riding to class.

jeff lutkus
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Re: riding in the snow

unfortunately, I don’t think I’ll find a tire that’ll fit my schwinn S-7, but
interesting info, nonetheless

>I have come across a couple sites that have studded snow tires; the SCHWALBE
>SNOW STUD, and the IRC BLIZZARD
>
>http://www.inoac.co.jp/irc/english/bc/products/blizzard.html
>http://www.schwalbetires.com/Cat1SnowStud.html
>
>I haven’t tried either of them since we don’t have ice or snow here. But, I
>have thought about getting one to try snow riding in the mountains. Has anyone
>ever ridden with a commertially produced snow tire?
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Re: riding in the snow

Nokian also makes studded snow tires. http://www.nokiantyres.fi/bike/winter.html

I haven’t had the opportunity to try them and I don’t know of any online stores
that sell them. Some day I’ll have to venture to a snow zone and try them.

john_childs

>From: John Hooten
>
>I have come across a couple sites that have studded snow tires; the SCHWALBE
>SNOW STUD, and the IRC BLIZZARD
>
>http://www.inoac.co.jp/irc/english/bc/products/blizzard.html
>http://www.schwalbetires.com/Cat1SnowStud.html
>
>I haven’t tried either of them since we don’t have ice or snow here. But, I
>have thought about getting one to try snow riding in the mountains. Has anyone
>ever ridden with a commertially produced snow tire?
>
>
>John Hooten
>

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RE: riding in the snow

> We saw our first significant snow of the season on my campus today, and it
> made me wonder what insight people might have to help sucessfully unicycle
> through the snow.

Dress waterproof!

> Idling was definately interesting – I am very much slipping at any change of
> direction. I do well so long as I make it as slow an idle as I can without
> loosing balance.

With practice you should be able to work up to an idle on all but the most
slippery of ice. You can ride through snow, depending on its consistency. Real
hard or packed snow you can simply ride on top. Fresh powder you can plow
through, just like a skier. Then there is the full range in between, some of
which is not too rideable, like the stuff we played on when riding
Mr. Toads in June. There were patches of snow, and our wheels sank in about
6-8 inches and spun, without rolling. I suppose you would have to hop
through that…

Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

There are two rules for success in life: Rule 1: Don’t tell people
everything you know.

RE: riding in the snow

> I’ve heard of “bike people” taking an old tire and driving sheet metal screws
> from the inside of the tire to make studs for ice riding. That might help, but
> don’t fall on it!

Bradley Bradley and I did that with carpet tacks once (on a bald old Schwinn S-7
tire). It worked but the nails didn’t last very long. Not only don’t fall on it,
don’t let it swing against your legs while you carry it outside, or swing
against the doorframe as you go outside (I did, and it stuck!)…

JF

Re: riding in the snow

Hi,

Does anyone know of a 24 x 3" tire that is studded?

-Kris.

— John Childs <john_childs@hotmail.com> wrote:
> Nokian also makes studded snow tires.
> http://www.nokiantyres.fi/bike/winter.html
>
> I haven’t had the opportunity to try them and I don’t know of any online
> stores that sell them. Some day I’ll have to venture to a snow zone and
> try them.
>
> john_childs
>
>
> >From: John Hooten
> >
> >I have come across a couple sites that have studded snow tires; the SCHWALBE
> >SNOW STUD, and the IRC BLIZZARD
> >
> >http://www.inoac.co.jp/irc/english/bc/products/blizzard.html
> >http://www.schwalbetires.com/Cat1SnowStud.html
> >
> >I haven’t tried either of them since we don’t have ice or snow here. But, I
> >have thought about getting one to try snow riding in the mountains. Has
> >anyone ever ridden with a commertially produced snow tire?
> >
> >
> >John Hooten
> >
>
> _____________________________________________________________________________-
> ________
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>


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RE: riding in the snow

Here’s an interesting question… chains, studded tires, and such will help to
increase traction. Has anyone had a “cheating” type argument about such things?
I figure, without the studs, or chains, one must develop some skill to stay up
under tough conditions… with studs and chains, you do not quite need as much
balancing power. (And of couse, on the other hand, people could be called stupid
for riding on a bald thin tire in the snow.)

> > Idling was definately interesting – I am very much slipping at any change
> > of direction. I do well so long as I make it as slow an idle as I can
> > without loosing balance.
>
>With practice you should be able to work up to an idle on all but the most
>slippery of ice. You can ride through snow, depending on its consistency. Real
>hard or packed snow you can simply ride on top. Fresh powder you can plow
>through, just like a skier. Then there is the full range in between, some of
>which is not too rideable, like the stuff we played on when riding
>Mr. Toads in June. There were patches of snow, and our wheels sank in about 6-8
> inches and spun, without rolling. I suppose you would have to hop through
> that…
>
>Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com
>
>There are two rules for success in life: Rule 1: Don’t tell people everything
>you know.
>

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RE: riding in the snow

> Here’s an interesting question… chains, studded tires, and such will
> help to increase traction. Has anyone had a “cheating” type argument about
> such things?

Cheating is when you use more than one wheel.

But if you want to be a purist, switch from your knobby tire to a street tire.
Or from your street tire to a slick tire. Or if you’re already riding a slick,
the most extreme step would probably be to get a “pizza cutter” tire, like Leo
V. uses in shows. That’s about as traction-free as you’re going to get… :slight_smile:

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

There are two rules for success in life: Rule 1: Don’t tell people
everything you know.

RE: riding in the snow

Hi,

I’ve found that fat, knobby unicycle tires have really good traction in compact
snow. Last Christmas I went on a short ski tour with my sister (she was on skis,
me on the uni), and I was able to go uphill as fast as she could (touring skis
with skins). I also tried mogul MUni and it worked out really well as long as it
was fairly steep. It seemed difficult to pound down through the moguls like a
skier would, though- I had difficulties turning that much. Groomed runs worked
great too.

-Kris.

— Jeff Lutkus <lutkus@hotmail.com> wrote:
> Here’s an interesting question… chains, studded tires, and such will help to
> increase traction. Has anyone had a “cheating” type argument about such
> things? I figure, without the studs, or chains, one must develop some skill to
> stay up under tough conditions… with studs and chains, you do not quite need
> as much balancing power. (And of couse, on the other hand, people could be
> called stupid for riding on a bald thin tire in the snow.)
>
>
>
>
> > > Idling was definately interesting – I am very much slipping at any change
> > > of direction. I do well so long as I make it as slow an idle as I can
> > > without loosing balance.
> >
> >With practice you should be able to work up to an idle on all but the most
> >slippery of ice. You can ride through snow, depending on its consistency.
> >Real hard or packed snow you can simply ride on top. Fresh powder you can
> >plow through, just like a skier. Then there is the full range in between,
> >some of which is not too rideable, like the stuff we played on when riding
> >Mr. Toads in June. There were patches of snow, and our wheels sank in about
> > 6-8 inches and spun, without rolling. I suppose you would have to hop
> > through that…
> >
> >Stay on top, John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com
> >
> >There are two rules for success in life: Rule 1: Don’t tell people everything
> >you know.
> >
>
> _____________________________________________________________________________-
> ________
> Get more from the Web. FREE MSN Explorer download : http://explorer.msn.com
>


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Re: riding in the snow

I have come across a couple sites that have studded snow tires; the SCHWALBE
SNOW STUD, and the IRC BLIZZARD

http://www.inoac.co.jp/irc/english/bc/products/blizzard.html
http://www.schwalbetires.com/Cat1SnowStud.html

I haven’t tried either of them since we don’t have ice or snow here. But, I have
thought about getting one to try snow riding in the mountains. Has anyone ever
ridden with a commertially produced snow tire?

John Hooten

Jeff Lutkus wrote:

> We saw our first significant snow of the season on my campus today, and it
> made me wonder what insight people might have to help sucessfully unicycle
> through the snow.
>
> I can tell now, more than ever that I need to master the rolling mount. I can
> generally freemount where the ground is flat, and the snow not very deep.
>
> Idling was definately interesting – I am very much slipping at any change of
> direction. I do well so long as I make it as slow an idle as I can without
> loosing balance.
>
> I’ve ridden over a few ice patches, but tend to fall off if I don’t spot the
> ice until I’m over it.
>
> I’ve been thinking about putting together a chain for my wheel. Any
> suggestions about what the best way to do whis is, or how much I could stand
> to benefit from doing so?
>
> Well, I was very disappointed that I could not easily work on my mountain
> unicycling skills when the winter weather started, but now that there’s snow
> on the ground, I can see I’ll be building plenty of new skills just by riding
> to class.
>
> jeff lutkus
> _____________________________________________________________________________-
> ________
> Get more from the Web. FREE MSN Explorer download : http://explorer.msn.com

Re: riding in the snow

On the Nokian site, http://www.nokiantyres.fi/bike/winter.html , under the
studded tire model named Freddie’s Revenz 336 a safety warning is given:
Always wear protective gear. Please prevent ass munch and do not ride over
other riders.

         In article &lt;LAW-F517MJJQ873Tlm7000003c7@hotmail.com&gt;,
             "John Childs" &lt;john_childs@hotmail.com&gt; wrote:

> Nokian also makes studded snow tires.
> http://www.nokiantyres.fi/bike/winter.html
>
> I haven’t had the opportunity to try them and I don’t know of any
online
> stores that sell them. Some day I’ll have to venture to a snow zone
and try
> them.
>
> john_childs
>

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/

RE: riding in the snow

I’ve heard of “bike people” taking an old tire and driving sheet metal screws
from the inside of the tire to make studs for ice riding. That might help, but
don’t fall on it!

-Rick

Re: riding in the snow

I haven’t had any cheating arguments. But a lot of people hear my tire and ask
if it’s studded. And considering that 90% of students’ bikes stay home on snowy
days, I figure any way I show up on a wheel is fair game.

I think studs make riding in the winter a lot safer. Two things normally bail me
in the winter: hitting unseen bumps & slipping on
ice. Studs can at least eliminate one of those, so I stud up any time
it gets icy.

Chris

Jeff Lutkus wrote:
>
> Here’s an interesting question… chains, studded tires, and such will help to
> increase traction. Has anyone had a “cheating” type argument about such
> things? I figure, without the studs, or chains, one must develop some skill to
> stay up under tough conditions… with studs and chains, you do not quite need
> as much balancing power. (And of couse, on the other hand, people could be
> called stupid for riding on a bald thin tire in the snow.)

Re: riding in the snow

On Wed, 13 Dec 2000, Jeff Lutkus wrote:
>unfortunately, I don’t think I’ll find a tire that’ll fit my schwinn S-7, but
>interesting info, nonetheless

It must be time for an upgrade…

Is the UTS kicking in yet? (Unicycle Toy Syndrome…)

Greg

Re: riding in the snow

On Tue, 12 Dec 2000, Jeff Lutkus wrote:
>We saw our first significant snow of the season on my campus today, and it made
>me wonder what insight people might have to help sucessfully unicycle through
>the snow.

We’ve had our first snow of the year the last couple of days too. Naturally I
had to give it a go. As I had about 5 inches of snow to plow through, I selected
my muni. It was pretty fun. I did better then I expected. However, like you, it
definitely revealed some flaws in my technique that I need to work on.

But I rode a little more at lunchtime today (my friend insisted…) over some
harder packed snow and through some lighter fluff and it was easier. He didn’t
have quite as easy a go at it, but at least neither of us got hurt.

Greg

RE: riding in the snow

On Wed, 13 Dec 2000, Kris Holm wrote:

>I’ve found that fat, knobby unicycle tires have really good traction in
>compact snow.

I don’t have much experience with snow, but my jaunts the last two days on a
Gazzoloddi 24x3 would definitely confirm this. It felt much more confident in
the snow then I expected.

But then again, it’s made in Finland and they definitely have a lot of
snow there…

Greg

RE: riding in the snow

On Wed, 13 Dec 2000, Rick Bissell wrote:

> I’ve heard of “bike people” taking an old tire and driving sheet metal screws
> from the inside of the tire to make studs for ice riding. That might help, but
> don’t fall on it!
>
> -Rick
>

Adding sheet metal screws makes ice riding MUCH more doable. They don’t help
much in the snow,though. Haven’t fallen on them yet…

Low air pressure also helps with winter riding since it helps smooth out the
frozen bumps that you can’t see under the latest snow.

Chris

Re: riding in the snow

Check out: http://sa-1.enteract.com/~icebike/Equipment/StudQuality.htm

The Icebike homepage has a lot of good info comparing different studded tires.

David Maxfield Bainbridge Island, WA

Re: riding in the snow

What a Blast!!!

I knocked on my riding buddy’s door at 9:00 pm last night, 4 inches of snow on
the ground and still coming down. “I’m going for a ride. You wanna come?”

His brakes were practically greased from the snow on his rims, especially his
front which isn’t ground. He also didn’t have “all wheel drive” like a uni,
loads of fun. We tried sideslides and such (mine weren’t very effective). I
couldn’t believe I was riding a snow covered set of wooden stairs! I never did
make the last run of them (about 5 flights, each flight has a different slope
and stair spacing). Then we found the sledding slope where all the frat. boys &
sorority girls were partying. They thought we were crazy, but we thought they
were in far worse danger of injury. Four people on a little piece of tarp going
off an icy jump = ouch. Some of them were cool and were riding those chairs down
with the metal runner-shaped legs. I stayed off the jump since it was ice, but
still- there was no going down that hill slowly. Definite drifting of the tire
just trying to go straight, and the more you skid the less you have to pedal :slight_smile:

Keep Riding!

Chris