Repair/Maintenance Books

I’d appreciate any recommendations on books for doing repairs and maintenance on
unicycles. Especially any that provide decent overviews of the parts and the
variety of types, e.g. cottered vs. cotterless cranks.

While I can’t see myself doing anything particularly complex, I’d still like to
have a basic understanding of the machine.

Is, for example, How to Build Unicycles and Artistic Bicycles, good for this
purpose? Are there books on bicycles that would be adequate?

Many thanks, Raphael Lasar Matawan, New Jersey

RE: Repair/Maintenance Books

> P.S, why are they called “saddles” on bikes and “seats” on unicycles???

That’s a good one. Unicycle “saddles” bear more resemblance to horse saddles
than bicycle ones do. But lots of people call them saddles. Seat is easier to
say though…

A saddle implies that you are straddling something. A unicycle is kind of hard
to straddle. So maybe it’s more of a seat (or a perch)…

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

“Wheel size matters” - Kevin (Gilby) Gilbertson

RE: Repair/Maintenance Books

> Whatever you call 'em, they still fit on a seatpost. For sure, I wouldn’t want
> to sit on a seatpost without a seat attached. Maybe the universal term for a
> saddle/seat should be “seatpost cover”. Don’t leave home without one.

Seatpost cover is what they should call those silly little seats on Trials bikes
(they look like something off a barbie bike). Apparently in some classes there
is a rule that the bike must have a seat, even if you never use it in the
competition. This is probably to prevent injury from an open pipe. I saw some
newer bikes that had neither seats nor dead-end seat tubes (nothing to get hurt
on), so maybe “seatpost capping” is the reason?

John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com

“Wheel size matters” - Kevin (Gilby) Gilbertson

Re: Repair/Maintenance Books

At 10:06 AM 5/3/00 -0400, Raphael Lasar wrote:
>I’d appreciate any recommendations on books for doing repairs and maintenance
>on unicycles. Especially any that provide decent overviews of the parts and the
>variety of types, e.g. cottered vs. cotterless cranks.

My favorite repair book is “Anybody’s Bike Book” by Tom Cuthbertson. It doesn’t
specifically cover unicycles, but this book does an excellent job of covering
the basics: bearing overhaul, fixing broken spokes and wheel truing, fixing
flats, crank removal and replacement (cottered and cotterless), lubrication,
seat adjustment…I think it would give you a lot of good information to get
you started and it is a very entertaining book to read (how many bicycle repair
books quote Kafka? This one does!) You can buy it on amazon.com.

One thing that I REALLY like about unicycles is the low maintenance factor

  • I always found it a real drag keeping the chain and sprockets on my road
    bike clean.

-Rick
P.S, why are they called “saddles” on bikes and “seats” on unicycles???

Re: Repair/Maintenance Books

Whatever you call 'em, they still fit on a seatpost. For sure, I wouldn’t want
to sit on a seatpost without a seat attached. Maybe the universal term for a
saddle/seat should be “seatpost cover”. Don’t leave home without one. Jim

John Foss wrote:
>
> > P.S, why are they called “saddles” on bikes and “seats” on unicycles???
>
> That’s a good one. Unicycle “saddles” bear more resemblance to horse saddles
> than bicycle ones do. But lots of people call them saddles. Seat is easier to
> say though…
>
> A saddle implies that you are straddling something. A unicycle is kind of hard
> to straddle. So maybe it’s more of a seat (or a perch)…
>
> John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone http://www.unicycling.com
>
> “Wheel size matters” - Kevin (Gilby) Gilbertson