Recommendation for Beginners

Set up two folding chairs back-to-back and get between them on your uni.
Hold onto the backs of the chairs and shove off. I learned this way and
two of my friends did too.

After you can go some distance, you will want to put one chair at each end
of your run and launch using just one chair.

–Mark

Mark Newbold Montpelier, Vermont USA http://dogfeathers.com Alternate
email: manx@sover.net

Mark Newbold <mark@dogfeathers.com> wrote in message
news:<3B91646C.EA2412BB@dogfeathers.com>…
> Set up two folding chairs back-to-back and get between them on your uni.
> Hold onto the backs of the chairs and shove off. I learned this way and
> two of my friends did too.
>
> After you can go some distance, you will want to put one chair at each
> end of your run and launch using just one chair.
>
> --Mark

My opinion:

For most absolute beginners, it is not possible to move even a few
revolutions without support, hence the chairs are useless. For a beginner
what is required is a fence top, deck railing, or such which can be used
while moving along and not just to start off. Ensure that the railing is
not too low or to high for you to sit straight up.

After a while, I have also found using the back of a car to be a useful
support. The advantage for beginners who have already spend time on a
railing is that the car allows for a complete revolution of support before
going “hands free”. This allows you to adjust shoes, position and such
before going ahead. And you are forced to try moving on your own after the
one or so revolution with the car’s support.

The most important requirement for learning Unicycling is motivation and
determination.

Hi David Stone, thanks for introducing me to this discussion group!

/Jay Shah

On Sat, 01 Sep 2001 22:37:15 GMT, Mark Newbold
<mark@dogfeathers.com> wrote:

>Set up two folding chairs back-to-back and get between them on your uni.
>Hold onto the backs of the chairs and shove off. I learned this way and
>two of my friends did too.
>
>After you can go some distance, you will want to put one chair at each
>end of your run and launch using just one chair.

Why didn’t I think of that?! I knew those two deck-chairs would come in
handy one day.

Cheers!

Jim.


http://www.javery.demon.co.uk/

I have been riding two weeks. I can now go almost endlessly (in a
straightish line). This is how I did it.

First, found a good support, a railing at the right high to feel
comfortable whilst sat up straight. Got used to mounting and feeling
comfortable on the uni. Then started moving along the railing, turning
around and going back. I found I used my hands less and less - but had to
make myself do so. Then I started riding along the railing without holding
on and grabing it at the last minute to turn around. After this I rode
from the railing to a camper van and back. A while later i though ‘what
the hell’ and just headed off into the great yonder. I practice several
times each day and get a little further every time.

One thing that also helped me was to learn to ride on a slight downward
slope. This has the effect of you having to pedal!! and hey presto -
you’re riding.

Just today I managed to ride uphill!! Now, mounting on that hill is a
different matter :slight_smile: - not to mention turning on it!

Anyone up for a lands-end john o’groats next year for this charity?
www.wildliferescue.org.uk

Tony

“Mark Newbold” <mark@dogfeathers.com> wrote in message
news:3B91646C.EA2412BB@dogfeathers.com
> Set up two folding chairs back-to-back and get between them on your uni.
> Hold onto the backs of the chairs and shove off. I learned this way and
> two of my friends did too.
>
> After you can go some distance, you will want to put one chair at each
> end of your run and launch using just one chair.
>
> --Mark
> –
> Mark Newbold Montpelier, Vermont USA http://dogfeathers.com Alternate
> email: manx@sover.net

> My opinion:
>
> For most absolute beginners, it is not possible to move even a few
> revolutions without support, hence the chairs are useless. For a
> beginner what is required is a fence top, deck railing, or such which
> can be used while moving along and not just to start off. Ensure that
> the railing is not too low or to high for you to sit straight up.

I learned useing two chairs too and thought it worked very well.

Peter

You can laugh, but my way certainly worked for me.

First off, I had a two objectives when I started.

a) I didn’t want to be watched - not an easy feat in NYC.
b) I didn’t want to get hurt.

I got permission from my synagogue to use their catering hall when it wasn’t in use. The carpet is very low, so it didn’t interfere with my progress, but at the same time, I’d rather wipe out on carpet than on concrete, any day!

The synagogue has about a dozen movable coatracks (on wheels). First, I set up two of them parallel to each other, sat on my uni in between while holding on to the middle bars. I “rode” around while holding on till I got used to the feel.

Then I graduated to the following setup. I arranged them end-to-end in parallel rows (about 3 or 4 coatracks on each side). I rode in between, while holding lightly or not at all onto the middle bars, progressively holding on less and less till I’d gotten the hang of it.

After 4 sessions of half an hour each, I’d gotten to the point where I didn’t need the racks anymore. It was still a while till I was perfectly at ease on the unicycle, but I had the feel and knew that I could do it.

I heartily recommend my synagogue / church method. Quiet, roomy and safe! Tell me if you try it!

On Tue, 4 Sep 2001 18:15:29 +0000 (UTC), Mordy
<forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote:

>I heartily recommend my synagogue / church method. Quiet, roomy and safe!
>Tell me if you try it!

Well I first tried to ride a uni belonging to a friend of mine in a church
hall back in the late '80s. It’s only since my sister gave me my own uni
last Christmas that I’m slowly but surely learning to ride (about six
pedals so far, but feeling like I’m nearly there).

Cheers,

Jim.


http://www.javery.demon.co.uk/

I practiced in our church occasionally when I was learning. Long
narrow hallways enabled me to reach both walls, carpeting was a plus
but there is always activity at our church so I covered my
embarrassing learning moments by getting others to join in the
attempts. We all laughed together.

Mordy wrote:
>
> You can laugh, but my way certainly worked for me.
>
> First off, I had a two objectives when I started.
>
> a) I didn’t want to be watched - not an easy feat in NYC.
> b) I didn’t want to get hurt.
>
> I got permission from my synagogue to use their catering hall when it
> wasn’t in use. The carpet is very low, so it didn’t interfere with my
> progress, but at the same time, I’d rather wipe out on carpet than on
> concrete, any day!
>
> The synagogue has about a dozen movable coatracks (on wheels). First, I
> set up two of them parallel to each other, sat on my uni in between
> while holding on to the middle bars. I “rode” around while holding on
> till I got used to the feel.
>
> Then I graduated to the following setup. I arranged them end-to-end in
> parallel rows (about 3 or 4 coatracks on each side). I rode in between,
> while holding lightly or not at all onto the middle bars, progressively
> holding on less and less till I’d gotten the hang of it.
>
> After 4 sessions of half an hour each, I’d gotten to the point where I
> didn’t need the racks anymore. It was still a while till I was perfectly
> at ease on the unicycle, but I had the feel and knew that I could do it.
>
> I heartily recommend my synagogue / church method. Quiet, roomy and
> safe! Tell me if you try it!
>
> –
> Mordy Posted via the Unicyclist Community - http://unicyclist.com/forums