Re: Is this a good deal? WARNING: OFF-TOPIC

On Sun, 12 May 2002 12:49:59 -0500, gauss
<gauss.4jxea@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>I just see that mistake a bunch and that one
>gets me. So does the one where somebody tries to argue that glass is
>really a liquid since it doesn’t have a melting point. I hate when
>people don’t believe me on that one.

Off-topic.

I’m confused as to what you believe in this case.

Anyway, I’ve heard that the viscosity of amorphous glass is a function
of temperature, and that it is less than infinity at room temperature.
I.e. it still flows albeit very slowly. Glass in medieval windows that
has been subjected to gravity for hundreds of years is thicker at the
bottom than at the top, or so I’ve been led to believe. But then,
panta rhei.

I don’t know the best definition of solid, but I think a “shape of its
own” is an element of it. Whether glass or (“liquid”) water have a
shape of their own depends on the time scale you look at it. But I
would argue that crystalline glass kept at room temperature does
have a shape of its own regardless of timescale. Hence it is
indisputably a solid.

Klaas Bil

“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked automagically from a database:”
“DUVDEVAN, SDF, ()”

Klaas Bil writes:

www.dicionary.com

This debate could go on and on, or we could all go for a ride :wink:

If you want to know more go here:

Is glass liquid or solid?

Gary

I think that describes this group rather nicely.

Christopher

I put an explanation in the conversation forum. It is not as complete as the link unicus provided which was very well written. I just wanted to mention that amorphous, as applies to materials science is not the same thing as amorphous you find in a dictionary. It refers to the lack of crystal structure. It doesn’t mean that there are no bonds formed between the atoms. Only that there is not long range periodicity that we find in most materials. It is also possible to force a metal to be amorphous. If you can cool it VERY FAST. It doesn’t mean it will take the shape of anything. It just means that it has better magnetic properties.

Re: Is this a good deal? WARNING: OFF-TOPIC

klaasbil_remove_the_spamkiller_@xs4all.nl (Klaas Bil) wrote in
news:3cdee61c.2376317@newszilla.xs4all.nl:

> bottom than at the top, or so I’ve been led to believe. But then,
> panta rhei.

What does panta rhei mean?

Re: Is this a good deal? WARNING: OFF-TOPIC

On Mon, 13 May 2002 03:22:51 GMT, Johnny B
<centromachetestakethisout@takethisoutyahoo.com> wrote:

> What does panta rhei mean?

Everything (or anything?) flows.

Klaas Bil

“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked automagically from a database:”
“gorilla, ~, 1080H”

I know all too well that glass is a solid. I now find myself owing my mother $200+ to replace the glass table that I boke whilst contact juggling. If it didnt have any particular shape, I’d just tell her that all we have to do is place the shards on top of eachother, and poof, like magic, I’d be out of debt.
Seriously though, I’d have to characterize glass as a solid. Logicaly, if I touch it, and I do not so through it at room temp, its pretty much solid to me.
VERY COOL EXPERIMENT
Whether you like this type of stuff, or not, I highly suggest you try this. Pour 1/2 cup of water into 2 cups of cornstarch. After mixing, you get a type of paste. This paste is similar in texture to a thick cake batter. If you try to gently immerse your hand in the mixture, it will go in quite easily. However, if you thrust your hand towards the mixture it will become hard as a rock. If you want to hold it in your hand it wil slip through your fingers, however if you keep tossing it up and letting it fall, it will stay solid. This has nothing to do with your hand being large. If you try to stab it with a sharp pencil, your tip will break.
**I dont remember if it was 1/2 cup of water and 2 cups of cornstarch, or if it was 1 cup of water and 2 cups of cornstarch. I suggest that you put in 1/2 cup first and see what hapens. Keep adding water and mixing till it looks like cake batter.
-David Kaplan

I just read about this cornstarch mixture on CNN- some new Tank can exzude it during battle to deflect artillery. I think they called them ‘DowBoys’… part of the new 9 billion dollar ‘Batter Battallion’.

Christopher

Whoah, and to think that in 3rd grade I was just playing with this stuff. I was way ahead of my time.
-David Kaplan

Re: Re: Is this a good deal? WARNING: OFF-TOPIC

“UniDak” <UniDak.4m66n@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:UniDak.4m66n@timelimit.unicyclist.com
>
> > VERY COOL EXPERIMENT
> Whether you like this type of stuff, or not, I highly suggest you try
> this. Pour 1/2 cup of water into 2 cups of cornstarch. After mixing, you
> get a type of paste. This paste is similar in texture to a thick cake
> batter. If you try to gently immerse your hand in the mixture, it will
> go in quite easily. However, if you thrust your hand towards the mixture
> it will become hard as a rock.

Non-Newtonian fluid? Just like Silly Putty, the next shin guard material?

Re: Re: Is this a good deal? WARNING: OFF-TOPIC

> VERY COOL EXPERIMENT
> Whether you like this type of stuff, or not, I highly suggest you try
> this. Pour 1/2 cup of water into 2 cups of cornstarch. After mixing, you
> get a type of paste. This paste is similar in texture to a thick cake
> batter. If you try to gently immerse your hand in the mixture, it will
> go in quite easily. However, if you thrust your hand towards the mixture
> it will become hard as a rock. If you want to hold it in your hand it
> will slip through your fingers, however if you keep tossing it up and
> letting it fall, it will stay solid. This has nothing to do with your
> hand being large. If you try to stab it with a sharp pencil, your tip
> will break.
> **I don’t remember if it was 1/2 cup of water and 2 cups of cornstarch,
> or if it was 1 cup of water and 2 cups of cornstarch. I suggest that you
> put in 1/2 cup first and see what happens. Keep adding water and mixing
> till it looks like cake batter.

Thixotrophy.

Human muscle behaves in a similar manner, said the massage therapist.