Quirky site sells Cokers on the cheap!

Re: Quirky site sells Cokers on the cheap!

On Mon, 2 Sep 2002 12:32:22 -0500, harper
<harper.ad5sz@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>
>Theoretically one could reach 120 mph on a Coker within 3 seconds of
>jumping out of a Cessna atop one.

I think 120 mph happens to be about the speed that a Cessna flies so
you would have that velocity from the moment you jump. Interestingly,
120 mph is also the typical free fall velocity for a human (although I
could not find a quote for a free-falling Cokerhead). So I argue that
the velocity (as a scalar) will be roughly constant at 120 mph until
deployment of a parachute. Interesting, really. But OT.

Klaas Bil

When will unicycle.com be stocking the Miyata parachute seats?

Freefalling on a Coker

C’mon, Klaas! Surely, even if you’ve never skydove before (I haven’t), you’re aware that the aircraft’s direction and the skydiver’s direction are (ideally) perpendicular…?

In the graphic model I provided, I believe that the helicopter’s downwash would actually accelerate the Cokerhead more rapidly than Harper’s original estimate. As we can see from the Stratoquest site, there’s an additional factor of initial altitude to consider. Theoretically, given a sufficiently stratospheric starting point, your average Cokerhead could easily attain Mach 1. I personally find it worrying that the site contains NO information on what happens upon parachute deployment at such speeds. Imagine Mach 1 abruptly interrupted by some strings and a nylon sheet.

Therefore, I recommend an entirely separate and independent parachute for the Coker itself. Preferrably with an automatic altitude-triggered deployment system.

Your heirs may want to ride the Coker to work now and then… within local speed limits, of course.

Re: Quirky site sells Cokers on the cheap!

On Tue, 3 Sep 2002 12:33:59 -0500, sendhair
<sendhair.af0pb@timelimit.unicyclist.com> wrote:

>C’mon, Klaas! Surely, even if you’ve never skydove before (I haven’t),
>you’re aware that the aircraft’s direction and the skydiver’s direction
>are (ideally) perpendicular…?
Yes, that’s why I added the “as a scalar” qualification. The
skydiver’s trajectory would approximate a parabola but the velocity
along the trajectory might well be about constant in magnitude. I have
not enough drive to work that out.
>
>In the graphic model I provided, I believe that the helicopter’s
>downwash would actually accelerate the Cokerhead more rapidly than
>Harper’s original estimate.
Yes but a Cessna is not a helicopter.

> As we can see from the Stratoquest site,
>there’s an additional factor of initial altitude to consider.
>Theoretically, given a sufficiently stratospheric starting point, your
>average Cokerhead could easily attain Mach 1. I personally find it
>worrying that the site contains NO information on what happens upon
>parachute deployment at such speeds.
But it does warn against doing so. Interesting site by the way, I’d
never heard of this record skydive.

> Imagine Mach 1 abruptly
>interrupted by some strings and a nylon sheet.
I would guess there would be a failure of parts involved. So
“interrupted” is the correct word. :astonished:

I can hear the topic police mumbling. Let’s get the thread off here.
I’m not normally frequenting Just Conversation (or any forum for that
matter). Email me if you have any more comments.

Klaas Bil

If you had this signature, I have forged it.