[Quick Tip] Standing your unicycle against a wall.

OK so many of you probably already figured this out already but if your
unicycle has a quick release seat post you can set the post all the way
down - on the wheel, thus acting as a parking brake so you can lean it
against a wall and it won’t roll away.

(took me a year to spot that one.)

Andrew xADF

Andrew-

Cool. 38 years and I still didn’t spot it. You pointed it out to me. Probably to most others, too.

this works, unless you ride a torker. torkers have caps on the bottem of the seat tube, not allowing the seat to get farther then the top of the fork.

----- Original Message ----- From: Andrew Feldhaus <Reply@Thread.pls>
Newsgroups: rec.sport.unicycling To: <rsu@unicycling.org> Sent: Tuesday,
December 18, 2001 4:50 PM Subject: [Quick Tip] Standing your unicycle
against a wall.

> OK so many of you probably already figured this out already but if your
> unicycle has a quick release seat post you can set the post all the way
> down - on the wheel, thus acting as a parking brake so you can lean it
> against a wall and it won’t roll away.
>
> (took me a year to spot that one.)
>
> Andrew xADF

My Torker has a stop welded into the bottom of the seat post tube. It will
not let the seat post go past that point and will not touch the tire.

Lowell

If you dont want to muck about with adjusting the seat height simply turn
the unicycle upside down and rest it on the saddle. The wheel leans on the
wall and the unicycle won’t fall.

Wayne…

“Andrew Feldhaus” <Reply@Thread.pls> wrote in message
news:9voh99$6he$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk
> OK so many of you probably already figured this out already but if your
> unicycle has a quick release seat post you can set the post all the way
> down - on the wheel, thus acting as a parking brake so you can lean it
> against a wall and it won’t roll away.
>
> (took me a year to spot that one.)
>
> Andrew xADF

Nice idea but I wonder if it’s not easier to put the uni “sufficiently
upright” against the wall. Saves you finding back the right height.
Then again, laying it sort-of-flat on the ground, or with seat on the
ground and tyre on ground and against wall, is even more practical. But
not as neat, OK.

Klaas Bil

On Tue, 18 Dec 2001 22:50:06 -0000, “Andrew Feldhaus”
<Reply@Thread.pls> wrote:

>OK so many of you probably already figured this out already but if your
>unicycle has a quick release seat post you can set the post all the way
>down - on the wheel, thus acting as a parking brake so you can lean it
>against a wall and it won’t roll away.
>
>(took me a year to spot that one.)
>
>Andrew xADF
>
>
>


“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked
automagically from a database:” “OPENBSD, blackjack, whitewater”

> If you dont want to muck about with adjusting the seat height simply
> turn the unicycle upside down and rest it on the saddle. The wheel leans
> on the wall and the unicycle won’t fall.
(which is great if you’ve got a clean tyre or a dirty wall)

----- Original Message ----- From: Andrew Feldhaus <Reply@Thread.pls>
Newsgroups: rec.sport.unicycling To: <rsu@unicycling.org> Sent: Wednesday,
December 19, 2001 6:21 PM Subject: Re: [Quick Tip] Standing your unicycle
against a wall.

> > If you dont want to muck about with adjusting the seat height simply
> > turn the unicycle upside down and rest it on the saddle. The wheel
> > leans on the wall and the unicycle won’t fall.
> (which is great if you’ve got a clean tyre or a dirty wall)

If you put a piece of your body armor between the tyre (tire) and the
wall you will protect the wall from a dirty tire. Or the tire from a
dirty wall.

Another suggestion is to mount a shelf bracket on the wall, minus shelf,
and hang the uni on it by the wheel.

Lowell

My solution to parking the uni…

I live in an apartment, so I couldn’t screw a hook into the wall or ceiling. And I didn’t want to risk marking the walls with my tire. So I built a free-standing rack from some scrap wood. Here’s how!

First, measure the length of your crank arm and double it. Mine was 10". Then hold the uni upside down and get the distance from the floor to the highest pedal when the cranks are aligned vertically. This measurement really depends on your height. Whatever you got (ex. 42"), add 2 inches to it (ex. 44").

You’ll need 2 lengths of 2x4 or 1x2 for posts. Using our example, one post will be 44", the other 34". The 10" difference is equal to the length of the both cranks.

Find some wood to use as feet and other piece to brace the posts together. Brace the posts at a distance so that the pedals rest atop the posts. If your pedals are like mine, you can set two nails in the top of the posts and the center of the pedal will fit into the gap. Here’s a rough ascii diagram of what I mean…

xxxxxxxx
x O x
xxxxxxxxxx
x O x
xxxxxxxx

In the end, you’ll have a rack that you can hang the uni on upside down. The pedals are held in place by the nails in the post and the seat will suspend about 2" above the floor. Mine holds well enough that I can swing the seat and the wheel is held in place and it won’t topple.

Darrell