PSAR on the Coker

Subject: PSAR on the Coker Newsgroups: rec.sport.unicycling Summary: Keywords:

It was about time, I’ve had my coker for a month now and barely got the trye
dirty yet, just doing the commute into Reading ha been good practise but hardly
exciting. Today was the day for an off road excursion.

Leaving Paul at the Cricket field to play his first game for the Kidmore End
Fourths I rode down the hill to Caversham, messed up my intension of working
round the high St on back roads and ended up pushing past a few shops in
preference to dicing with death at the traffic lights. I rode up hill to find
the turning which would take me back down to the River. Today I was following to
Thames from Caversham to Whitchurch for a cuppa at a friends house and then over
the river and back along the tow path into Reading.

The Bridle road to Whitchurch is very popular with the MTB set, though I’m not
sure why, based on my ride today it is largely dull riding on good tracks. So I
settled down to eating up the miles, something the Coker is very good for. Only
came off once and that was because I bottled it when faced with the only large
muddy patch on route. The best riding came after mapledurham, an uphill section
on a flinty narrow path, the other week we did this path as a down hill section
of another ride.On reaching the brow of the hill the bridle path once more
became a tarmac road, winding past stables, big houses and vineyards into the
village of Whitchurch on Thames. One cup of tea and some idle chat later I
wheeled out again and crossed a toll bridge over the Thames - no charge for
cycles- to find a summer fete in full swing on the riverbank I hoped to ride
along. I asked and was assured there was no problem , to use the tow path I had
only to “go through that gate over there” so I did and found the back way in to
the fete, and rode past the Fire Brigade showing off their hose technique into
the river to the tunes of a folk trio called the ancient men. It was a typical
english village fete but I was not stopping to buy jam, after all i did not have
a program having come in the back door. Leaving the noise and children behind I
settled down to chewing up some more miles, the lumpy grassy path took a bit of
getting used to but presented no real problems to the Coker’s huge wheel. Unlike
the kissing gates which cropped up every half mile or so, there was not enough
room in the gates close embrace for the 3ft stright line the coker takes up and
I had to resort to heaving it over the top and walking through. By Mapledurham
lock I was treated to the sureal sight of a troop of roundhead soldiers
marching, with pikes and drummer boy, past a car park full of volvos. A civil
war re-enactment group were on the battle trail just across the river from me. I
then got a bit lost as I had to leave the river bank and navigate round a rail
line and a marina. Two young toughs hanging around Tilehurst station helped me
clamber over a fence and pointed me on my way back to the tow path towards
Reading,( and offered me a ciggie, and told me I should me carefull coz I might
meet a mugger, these kids were about 13 and thought they were hard, bless). I
rolled though a few more miles, got respect from a bunch of lads on MTBs and
then found myself at the start line of a rowing regatta just as a race started.
So I decided to join in and belted along the next mile trying to stay ahead of
the boats ( 8 man sculls), much to the disgust of thr Pangbourne cox who berated
his crew that they were being beaten by a unicycle. I had to slow down as the
finish line approched not wanting to run over any spectators but the Pangbourne
crew and I finished neck and neck. Then I went home, and it started raining. I
did about 22 km in 2 hours riding, the route was pretty and easy. And Paul…his
team won so he was happy too. sarah

Re: PSAR on the Coker

Sarah,

You are lucky to have so much scenery/places to ride!! I’m jealous. I live in
Tulsa, Oklahoma/USA. Here, there are no sidewalks to ride on & the streets are
just big enough for cars & that’s it. I have to haul my uni to another town or
out in the country in order to even be safe riding.

We do have bike trails that parallel the highways. They are paved with a dotted
line (like a mini highway) and wind through trees. But that trail only goes for
a few miles. I like to make a day of my unicycle riding & this trail gets pretty
old. It’s not very challenging either…

I’m planning on getting a coker here in a couple of weeks… I can’t wait!! I
have a 24" Schwinn right now. I also built a UW which I still have to work on…
But, I’m looking forward to getting the coker so that my wife & I can ride long
distances together.

Talk to you later,

Shane

Sarah Miller wrote:

> Subject: PSAR on the Coker Newsgroups: rec.sport.unicycling Summary: Keywords:
>
> It was about time, I’ve had my coker for a month now and barely got the trye
> dirty yet, just doing the commute into Reading ha been good practise but
> hardly exciting. Today was the day for an off road excursion.
>
> Leaving Paul at the Cricket field to play his first game for the Kidmore End
> Fourths I rode down the hill to Caversham, messed up my intension of working
> round the high St on back roads and ended up pushing past a few shops in
> preference to dicing with death at the traffic lights. I rode up hill to find
> the turning which would take me back down to the River. Today I was following
> to Thames from Caversham to Whitchurch for a cuppa at a friends house and then
> over the river and back along the tow path into Reading.
>
> The Bridle road to Whitchurch is very popular with the MTB set, though I’m not
> sure why, based on my ride today it is largely dull riding on good tracks. So
> I settled down to eating up the miles, something the Coker is very good for.
> Only came off once and that was because I bottled it when faced with the only
> large muddy patch on route. The best riding came after mapledurham, an uphill
> section on a flinty narrow path, the other week we did this path as a down
> hill section of another ride.On reaching the brow of the hill the bridle path
> once more became a tarmac road, winding past stables, big houses and vineyards
> into the village of Whitchurch on Thames. One cup of tea and some idle chat
> later I wheeled out again and crossed a toll bridge over the Thames - no
> charge for cycles- to find a summer fete in full swing on the riverbank I
> hoped to ride along. I asked and was assured there was no problem , to use the
> tow path I had only to “go through that gate over there” so I did and found
> the back way in to the fete, and rode past the Fire Brigade showing off their
> hose technique into the river to the tunes of a folk trio called the ancient
> men. It was a typical english village fete but I was not stopping to buy jam,
> after all i did not have a program having come in the back door. Leaving the
> noise and children behind I settled down to chewing up some more miles, the
> lumpy grassy path took a bit of getting used to but presented no real problems
> to the Coker’s huge wheel. Unlike the kissing gates which cropped up every
> half mile or so, there was not enough room in the gates close embrace for the
> 3ft stright line the coker takes up and I had to resort to heaving it over the
> top and walking through. By Mapledurham lock I was treated to the sureal sight
> of a troop of roundhead soldiers marching, with pikes and drummer boy, past a
> car park full of volvos. A civil war re-enactment group were on the battle
> trail just across the river from me. I then got a bit lost as I had to leave
> the river bank and navigate round a rail line and a marina. Two young toughs
> hanging around Tilehurst station helped me clamber over a fence and pointed me
> on my way back to the tow path towards Reading,( and offered me a ciggie, and
> told me I should me carefull coz I might meet a mugger, these kids were about
> 13 and thought they were hard, bless). I rolled though a few more miles, got
> respect from a bunch of lads on MTBs and then found myself at the start line
> of a rowing regatta just as a race started. So I decided to join in and belted
> along the next mile trying to stay ahead of the boats ( 8 man sculls), much to
> the disgust of thr Pangbourne cox who berated his crew that they were being
> beaten by a unicycle. I had to slow down as the finish line approched not
> wanting to run over any spectators but the Pangbourne crew and I finished neck
> and neck. Then I went home, and it started raining. I did about 22 km in 2
> hours riding, the route was pretty and easy. And Paul…his team won so he was
> happy too. sarah