Proper English.

Unicyclists, Look at the above word. Think! Is it correct? I don’t
know, but my spell checker doesn’t think so, neither does my
dictionary. I can’t seem to find “unicyclist(s)” in any type of
dictionary, and I wonder, Is unicyclist(s) correct english? If not,
what would we use, Unicycler(s)? This sounds so akward. Maybe we
should trash conventional english’s usage and stick with “ist(s).” Got
any facts? write me or the list. Hey, I just got an idea; a glossary
of unicycle terms. This would’ve helped me figure out what gliding, or
a uni spin was. Just an idea! Karl Frankowski (Madison, WI)

RE: Proper English.

Well, gee, it’s in MY spell checker . . . I’ve got “unicyclist,” “unicycle,” but
(counter-intuitively) no “unicycling.”

I got by okay with “Einradler” when we lived in Austria, by analogy to “Radler”
(“cyclist;” literally, “wheeler”). The alternate form would probably have been
something ungainly like “Einradlfahrer,” analogous to “Radlfahrer” (“bicycle
rider;” literally, “wheel driver”). Could we cite comparative linguistics in our
favor and go with “unicyclist” by analogy to “cyclist”? Otherwise we’re probably
looking at some such unsatisfactory workaround as “unicycle rider,” by analogy
to “bicycle rider,” a locution seldom heard in these parts.

And hey: if it’s not in the default dictionary, that’s what the custom
dictionary is for, no? But I’m still trying to find “akward” <g>. Paul Goodrich
(Portland, Oregon)
psgoodrich@bpa.gov

From: bkonarsk To: unicycling Subject: Proper English. Date: Saturday, November
05, 1994 0:02

      Unicyclists, Look at the above word. Think! Is it correct? I don't
      know, but my spell checker doesn't think so, neither does my
      dictionary. I can't seem to find "unicyclist(s)" in any type of
      dictionary, and I wonder, Is unicyclist(s) correct english? If not,
      what would we use, Unicycler(s)? This sounds so akward. Maybe we
      should trash conventional english's usage and stick with "ist(s)." Got
      any facts? write me or the list. Hey, I just got an idea; a glossary
      of unicycle terms. This would've helped me figure out what gliding, or
      a uni spin was. Just an idea! Karl Frankowski (Madison, WI)

Re: Proper English.

Whatever the word is for one-who-rides-a-unicycle, I, for one, would prefer it
didn’t have the word “cyclist” in it.

Around the University of Queensland are various signs saying “Cyclists
Dismount”, and I would rather they didn’t apply to me! :slight_smile:

I don’t consider myself nearly as much a danger to pedestrians as
bicyclists. (Nor the security guards in their vans who patrol the place
enforcing such rules!)

Regards,

Julian.

– Julian Orbach (julian@cs.uq.oz.au) – University of Queensland,
Brisbane, Australia

Re: RE: Proper English.

Goodrich, Paul - TEB wrote:
|>
|> Well, gee, it’s in MY spell checker . . . I’ve got “unicyclist,” “unicycle,”
|> but (counter-intuitively) no “unicycling.”

I recently posted a message saying that “unicyclist” is a recognized word. It is
listed ini Webster’s Third International.
|>
|> I got by okay with “Einradler” when we lived in Austria, by analogy to
|> “Radler” (“cyclist;” literally, “wheeler”). The alternate form would probably
|> have been something ungainly like “Einradlfahrer,” analogous to

In German, I think “Einradfahrer” or something like that is correct. Perhaps
Rold should verify it…

Stay on top,

Jack Halpern IF Vice President

Kanji Dictionary Publishing Society 1-3-502 3-Chome Niiza Niiza-shi, Saitama 352
JAPAN Voice: +81-048-481-3103 Fax: +81-048-479-1323

Re: Proper English.

> |> I got by okay with “Einradler” when we lived in Austria, by analogy to
> |> “Radler” (“cyclist;” literally, “wheeler”). The alternate form would
> |> probably have been something ungainly like “Einradlfahrer,” analogous to
>
> In German, I think “Einradfahrer” or something like that is correct. Perhaps
> Rold should verify it…

Yes, “Einradfahrer” ist correct. Still I would not be surprised if people in
Austria call us “Einradler”.

            Rolf

Re: RE: Proper English.

Note that I said Austria, not Germany. “Radl” is distinctively
Austrian/Upper-Bavarian for standard-German “Rad” in the sense of “bicycle.”
Even in Germany, though, a bicyclist is commonly referred to as a “Radler”.
There is even a drink made by mixing lemonade and beer which goes under that
name; apparently cyclists found the combination useful as a training beverage .
. . yecch.

From: bkonarsk To: unicycling Subject: Re: RE: Proper English. Date: Friday,
November 08, 1901 11:02

Goodrich, Paul - TEB wrote:
|>
|> Well, gee, it’s in MY spell checker . . . I’ve got “unicyclist,”
“unicycle,”
|> but (counter-intuitively) no “unicycling.”

I recently posted a message saying that “unicyclist” is a recognized word. It is
listed ini Webster’s Third International.
|>
|> I got by okay with “Einradler” when we lived in Austria, by analogy to
|> “Radler” (“cyclist;” literally, “wheeler”). The alternate form would probably
|> have been something ungainly like “Einradlfahrer,” analogous to

In German, I think “Einradfahrer” or something like that is correct. Perhaps
Rold should verify it…

Stay on top,

Jack Halpern IF Vice President

Kanji Dictionary Publishing Society 1-3-502 3-Chome Niiza Niiza-shi, Saitama 352
JAPAN Voice: +81-048-481-3103 Fax: +81-048-479-1323

Re: Proper English.

Oba soebstverstaendlich! (For those not into such things, that’s an attempt to
spell an Austrian dialectal pronunciation of the German for “obviously”).

See my reply to Jack. The only place I’ve encountered the word “Radfahrer” in
Austria, outside official publications like the traffic-law booklet, is the
slang usage, in which it refers to a “social climber” (bowing to those above,
stepping on those below).

The Swiss refer to a bike as a “Velo;” anybody know what they call a unicycle?

Paul Goodrich
psgoodrich@bpa.gov

From: bkonarsk To: Unicycling-list Subject: Re: Proper English. Date: Tuesday,
November 08, 1994 14:58

> |> I got by okay with “Einradler” when we lived in Austria, by analogy to
> |> “Radler” (“cyclist;” literally, “wheeler”). The alternate form would
> |> probably have been something ungainly like “Einradlfahrer,” analogous
to
>
> In German, I think “Einradfahrer” or something like that is correct.
Perhaps
> Rold should verify it…

Yes, “Einradfahrer” ist correct. Still I would not be surprised if people in
Austria call us “Einradler”.

            Rolf

Re: Proper English.

>> nope. in russian a bike is a “velociped”. a unicycle, as much as I can
>> gather, is an “odnokolosni velociped” – i.e. a one-wheeled bicycle. it’s a
>> bit of a mouthful. you’d think something like a unicycle would deserve its
>> own word. ah, well… -sara (Langseth: sl@cs.brown.edu)
>
>All my Russian friends call a unicycle a (spelled phonetically) “monot- seekl.”
>These are (former) Soviet circus performers, such as Alexander Frisch, so I
>believe their version would be what is commonly used.

John Foss, President International Unicycling Federation unifoss@cerfnet.com

Re: Proper English.

On Tue, 8 Nov 1994, Goodrich, Paul - TEB wrote:

> The Swiss refer to a bike as a “Velo;” anybody know what they call a unicycle?
nope. in russian a bike is a “velociped”. a unicycle, as much as I can gather,
is an “odnokolosni velociped” – i.e. a one-wheeled bicycle. it’s a bit of a
mouthful. you’d think something like a unicycle would deserve its own word.
ah, well… -sara