pronunciations

How do you pronounce Suzue, Miyata, Muni, and Wilder?
Is it like Sooze, Miata (like the car), Mew-nee, and Will-der?

I think its Suh-zoo-eee, Mee-ah-tah, M’you-nee, Weye-el-der
-David Kaplan

Bzzzt on the Japanese ones. How about: Sue-zoo-eh, Me-ya-tah, your M’you-nee
is great, and Wilder is the same as in “Suzy’s wilder than Mia.”

—Nathan

“UniDak” <forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote in message
news:a3srio$89g$1@laurel.tc.umn.edu
>
>
> I think its Suh-zoo-eee, Mee-ah-tah, M’you-nee, Weye-el-der
> -David Kaplan
>
>
> Import Car Fan wrote:
> > How do you pronounce Suzue, Miyata, Muni, and Wilder? Is it like
Sooze,
> > Miata (like the car), Mew-nee, and Will-der?
>
>
> –
> UniDak
> Posted via the Unicyclist Community - http://unicyclist.com/forums

UniDak <forum.member@unicyclist.com> wrote:

> I think its M’you-nee,

In the UK its Mew-nee , the sport, and mew-nee the pashley model. Writen
muni, the sport and MUni the Pashley.

So one can go for a muni, be a munier, go muniing, have munied and have
a MUni or a muni ( any other Off road unicycle expect the Pashley). One
could own a DMATU ( DM all terrain Unicycle) and refer to it as a
muni.

sarah


British Unicycle Convention #9 April 19-21 2002
Unicycle Hockey, Games, Muni rides, Quidditch and Barn dance
Harry Cheshire High School, Habberley rd, Kidderminster
http://www.unicycle.org.uk/buc9/

> In the UK its Mew-nee , the sport, and mew-nee the pashley
> model. Writen muni, the sport and MUni the Pashley.

How do you pronounce “Mew?” :slight_smile:

I pronounce the word “Myou-nee” because it comes from “Mountain Uni.” Not to
be confused with “Mooney.”

My experience with the Pashley is that the stickers spell it “Muni.” and the
dorky capitalization “MUni” is what I’ve been calling this sport since 1996.
I think I thought it up, and it has been loosely picked up by others.

Stay on top,
John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone
jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“You’re not supposed to wash your Roach armor” - Nathan Hoover, on safety
equipment cleaning methods

John Foss <john_foss@asinet.com> wrote:
>> In the UK its Mew-nee , the sport, and mew-nee the pashley
>> model. Writen muni, the sport and MUni the Pashley.
> How do you pronounce “Mew?” :slight_smile:
Like what a cat does, when it mews.
> I pronounce the word “Myou-nee” because it comes from “Mountain Uni.” Not to
> be confused with “Mooney.”

> My experience with the Pashley is that the stickers spell it “Muni.” and the
> dorky capitalization “MUni” is what I’ve been calling this sport since 1996.
> I think I thought it up, and it has been loosely picked up by others.

I stand corrected on one point, Pashley do indead use a lower case u.I’ve
even gone to look at the oldest Muni shirt we have , a now very rare
contents unstable shirt Paul won in a muni race in 1997. So the MU version
must refer to the sport at lest in some places, normal UK usage is muni
the sport.

However, I have to beg to differ on who coined the term.
Duncan Castling designed the muni with Pashley in 1994 , with the name
muni all ready coined I think Duncan beat you too it. the NW UK muniers
have been using the term muni since 94 or 95 , its hard to say which side
of new year things happened.Mini Mansells write of the INSIPIDS ride of
Nov 1996 uses the term freely and this was the second mass muni ride for
some of that group as they had already held a muni event at the same place
in July 1996. Minis write up is at
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/mini.mansell/insipids.html
Roger davies also has a potted history of Muni on his site at
http://www.unicycle.uk.com/muni.asp
Which refers to Duncans 1994 work on the muni with Pashley and his
entries into Polaris Challenge MTB events in 1994 & 95.

I havn’t yet found out what the muni at Unicon 1996 was called ( the
unicycle page and IUF pages seem to be down). I have a theory that if the
Muni race at UniconVIII was called Muni, that event may be what made the
term Muni universal rather than local to the UK.

sarah
Who thinks jack H might like the references for his reserch into unicycle
linguistic history.

  British Unicycle Convention #9  April 19-21 2002

Unicycle Hockey, Games, Muni rides, Quidditch and Barn dance
Harry Cheshire High School, Habberley rd, Kidderminster
http://www.unicycle.org.uk/buc9/

How is Gazzaloddi pronounced?
And how would you say Gazz?

import car fan said:
>How is Gazzaloddi pronounced?
>And how would you say Gazz?

gazz? its like when sombody sneezes:
GAZZ-unt-tight

its also rymes with the begining of mazda. MAZ-GAZZ

gazzaLODDI- the LODDI part rymes with rod-ee.

final result: mazza-rodee, like the car
(gaz.a.lod.ee)

tra la la la la
dan

> However, I have to beg to differ on who coined the term.
> Duncan Castling designed the muni with Pashley in 1994 ,
> with the name muni all ready coined I think Duncan
> beat you too it.

Indeed he did, no argument. I only lay claim to the capital “U” (which may
be dropped in the future as it’s a little annoying to type and explain).

> of new year things happened.Mini Mansells write of the
> INSIPIDS ride of Nov 1996 uses the term freely and this
> was the second mass muni ride for
> some of that group as they had already held a muni event
> at the same place in July 1996.

I learned of the word “muni” from the unicycling newsgroup around that time.
In April of 1996 I discovered the trails in Auburn, CA, and soon decided to
put together the first MUni Weekend. Somewhere in there I started using the
capital U to signify “Mountain Unicycling.”

> Roger davies also has a potted history of Muni on his site at
> http://www.unicycle.uk.com/muni.asp

That’s a great write-up, though it could use a tad bit of updating and maybe
even some newer pictures.

> I havn’t yet found out what the muni at Unicon 1996 was called ( the
> unicycle page and IUF pages seem to be down).

I think it was called Orienteering, though the “M” word was certainly used
along with it. It was an orienteering event, with people riding Munis (or
MUnis) if they had them.

> I have a theory that if the Muni race at UniconVIII was
> called Muni, that event may be what made the
> term Muni universal rather than local to the UK.

I think it was already sort of universal before that, as I was already
promoting my event as “MUni Weekend” at that time. From Duncan and friends
at the 1994 Polaris Challenge, to the unicycling newsgroup, to the other
off-roaders of that time.

George Peck was never a big fan of the word, because he didn’t want people
to think they needed mountains (true, I often have to remind people of
this). he always preferred “rough terrain unicycling,” as used on the title
of his video. MUni is easy to say, but can be confused with other things,
such as the Municipal Transit system of San Francisco (type “muni” into a
search engine).

I liked using “Muni/MUni” because it rides the same wave of popularity as
mountain biking. You can ride a mountain bike anywhere, mountain or no, and
the same applies to a unicycle.

> sarah
> Who thinks jack H might like the references for his reserch
> into unicycle linguistic history.

Yes, Jack was the one who suggested we drop the “U.” I’m still undecided…

Stay on top,
John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone
jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“You’re not supposed to wash your Roach armor” - Nathan Hoover, on safety
equipment cleaning methods

A couple of history questions:

What are the earliest that people know riders were riding offroad on a unicycle? I don’t mean
just riding down a dirt path, but actively pursuing it as a sport.

My understanding is that the mid-eighties were about the earliest?

Also, what is the earliest that people were pursuing trials as a sport. Again, I don’t mean just
hopping curves or riding cones, but actively doing it as a specific sport. George Peck and I were
fairly actively doing pure unicycle trials around 1986, which is the earliest I know of. Anybody
have input on this?

-Kris.

— John Foss <john_foss@asinet.com> wrote:
> > However, I have to beg to differ on who coined the term.
> > Duncan Castling designed the muni with Pashley in 1994 ,
> > with the name muni all ready coined I think Duncan
> > beat you too it.
>
> Indeed he did, no argument. I only lay claim to the capital “U” (which may
> be dropped in the future as it’s a little annoying to type and explain).
>
> > of new year things happened.Mini Mansells write of the
> > INSIPIDS ride of Nov 1996 uses the term freely and this
> > was the second mass muni ride for
> > some of that group as they had already held a muni event
> > at the same place in July 1996.
>
> I learned of the word “muni” from the unicycling newsgroup around that time.
> In April of 1996 I discovered the trails in Auburn, CA, and soon decided to
> put together the first MUni Weekend. Somewhere in there I started using the
> capital U to signify “Mountain Unicycling.”
>
> > Roger davies also has a potted history of Muni on his site at
> > http://www.unicycle.uk.com/muni.asp
>
> That’s a great write-up, though it could use a tad bit of updating and maybe
> even some newer pictures.
>
> > I havn’t yet found out what the muni at Unicon 1996 was called ( the
> > unicycle page and IUF pages seem to be down).
>
> I think it was called Orienteering, though the “M” word was certainly used
> along with it. It was an orienteering event, with people riding Munis (or
> MUnis) if they had them.
>
> > I have a theory that if the Muni race at UniconVIII was
> > called Muni, that event may be what made the
> > term Muni universal rather than local to the UK.
>
> I think it was already sort of universal before that, as I was already
> promoting my event as “MUni Weekend” at that time. From Duncan and friends
> at the 1994 Polaris Challenge, to the unicycling newsgroup, to the other
> off-roaders of that time.
>
> George Peck was never a big fan of the word, because he didn’t want people
> to think they needed mountains (true, I often have to remind people of
> this). he always preferred “rough terrain unicycling,” as used on the title
> of his video. MUni is easy to say, but can be confused with other things,
> such as the Municipal Transit system of San Francisco (type “muni” into a
> search engine).
>
> I liked using “Muni/MUni” because it rides the same wave of popularity as
> mountain biking. You can ride a mountain bike anywhere, mountain or no, and
> the same applies to a unicycle.
>
> > sarah
> > Who thinks jack H might like the references for his reserch
> > into unicycle linguistic history.
>
> Yes, Jack was the one who suggested we drop the “U.” I’m still undecided…
>
>
> Stay on top,
> John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone
> jfoss@unicycling.com
> www.unicycling.com
>
>
> “You’re not supposed to wash your Roach armor” - Nathan Hoover, on safety
> equipment cleaning methods
> ___________________________________________________________________________
> rec.sport.unicycling mailing list - www.unicycling.org/mailman/listinfo/rsu


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I was there or about in about 1986, I was photographed riding down the
Kamakarsi Run down Mammoth Mountain in California in June 1987 I believe on
my Pashley 26", modified by myself from my 24", it had a 1.5" tyre and it
had cottered cranks! I made the front cover or MBUK magazine.

Roger


The UK’s Unicycle Source
http://www.unicycle.uk.com


----- Original Message -----
From: “Kris Holm” <danger_uni@yahoo.com>
To: “John Foss” <john_foss@asinet.com>; <rsu@unicycling.org>
Sent: Monday, February 11, 2002 7:25 PM
Subject: RE: pronunciations, now “History”

> A couple of history questions:
>
> What are the earliest that people know riders were riding offroad on a
unicycle? I don’t mean
> just riding down a dirt path, but actively pursuing it as a sport.
>
> My understanding is that the mid-eighties were about the earliest?
>
> Also, what is the earliest that people were pursuing trials as a sport.
Again, I don’t mean just
> hopping curves or riding cones, but actively doing it as a specific sport.
George Peck and I were
> fairly actively doing pure unicycle trials around 1986, which is the
earliest I know of. Anybody
> have input on this?
>
> -Kris.
>
>
> — John Foss <john_foss@asinet.com> wrote:
> > > However, I have to beg to differ on who coined the term.
> > > Duncan Castling designed the muni with Pashley in 1994 ,
> > > with the name muni all ready coined I think Duncan
> > > beat you too it.
> >
> > Indeed he did, no argument. I only lay claim to the capital “U” (which
may
> > be dropped in the future as it’s a little annoying to type and explain).
> >
> > > of new year things happened.Mini Mansells write of the
> > > INSIPIDS ride of Nov 1996 uses the term freely and this
> > > was the second mass muni ride for
> > > some of that group as they had already held a muni event
> > > at the same place in July 1996.
> >
> > I learned of the word “muni” from the unicycling newsgroup around that
time.
> > In April of 1996 I discovered the trails in Auburn, CA, and soon decided
to
> > put together the first MUni Weekend. Somewhere in there I started using
the
> > capital U to signify “Mountain Unicycling.”
> >
> > > Roger davies also has a potted history of Muni on his site at
> > > http://www.unicycle.uk.com/muni.asp
> >
> > That’s a great write-up, though it could use a tad bit of updating and
maybe
> > even some newer pictures.
> >
> > > I havn’t yet found out what the muni at Unicon 1996 was called ( the
> > > unicycle page and IUF pages seem to be down).
> >
> > I think it was called Orienteering, though the “M” word was certainly
used
> > along with it. It was an orienteering event, with people riding Munis
(or
> > MUnis) if they had them.
> >
> > > I have a theory that if the Muni race at UniconVIII was
> > > called Muni, that event may be what made the
> > > term Muni universal rather than local to the UK.
> >
> > I think it was already sort of universal before that, as I was already
> > promoting my event as “MUni Weekend” at that time. From Duncan and
friends
> > at the 1994 Polaris Challenge, to the unicycling newsgroup, to the other
> > off-roaders of that time.
> >
> > George Peck was never a big fan of the word, because he didn’t want
people
> > to think they needed mountains (true, I often have to remind people of
> > this). he always preferred “rough terrain unicycling,” as used on the
title
> > of his video. MUni is easy to say, but can be confused with other
things,
> > such as the Municipal Transit system of San Francisco (type “muni” into
a
> > search engine).
> >
> > I liked using “Muni/MUni” because it rides the same wave of popularity
as
> > mountain biking. You can ride a mountain bike anywhere, mountain or no,
and
> > the same applies to a unicycle.
> >
> > > sarah
> > > Who thinks jack H might like the references for his reserch
> > > into unicycle linguistic history.
> >
> > Yes, Jack was the one who suggested we drop the “U.” I’m still
undecided…
> >
> >
> > Stay on top,
> > John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone
> > jfoss@unicycling.com
> > www.unicycling.com
> >
> >
> > “You’re not supposed to wash your Roach armor” - Nathan Hoover, on
safety
> > equipment cleaning methods
> >


> > rec.sport.unicycling mailing list -
www.unicycling.org/mailman/listinfo/rsu
>
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Send FREE Valentine eCards with Yahoo! Greetings!
> http://greetings.yahoo.com
>


> rec.sport.unicycling mailing list -
www.unicycling.org/mailman/listinfo/rsu

I’m referring to the 1980s, and specifically to mountain unicycling.

-Kris.

VerseUni@aol.com wrote:
>
> In a message dated 2/11/02 2:27:02 PM, danger_uni@yahoo.com writes:
>
> << A couple of history questions:
>
> What are the earliest that people know riders were riding offroad on a
> unicycle? I don’t mean
> just riding down a dirt path, but actively pursuing it as a sport.
>
> My understanding is that the mid-eighties were about the earliest? >>
>
> Kris,
>
> Are you speaking of the 1880’s or referring to modern day unicycling? I am
> sure that the people in the mid 1880’s also were sport minded in riding
> adventures.
>
> Al Hemminger


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----- Original Message -----
From: “John Foss” <john_foss@asinet.com>
To: “‘Sarah Miller’” <sarah@vimes.u-net.com>; <rsu@unicycling.org>
Sent: Monday, February 11, 2002 6:49 PM
Subject: RE: pronunciations

<snip>

> > Roger davies also has a potted history of Muni on his site at
> > http://www.unicycle.uk.com/muni.asp
>
> That’s a great write-up, though it could use a tad bit of updating and
maybe
> even some newer pictures.

Thanks John,

I am open to re-writes and certainly new photographs. Kris, do you have any
nice ones for me, John you as well? and George? I will hijack Duncan
sometime and get a new one of him… maybe I should put the ironing one of
him up :slight_smile:
The equipment bit definitely needs updating. Oh well.

Roger

i once had a Pashley catalog about 6 years ago.they had one mountain unicycle for sale in there.next to the uni on the other page was a picture of two guys uni-ing down a dirt road and judging by there neon green apparel/helmet covers it looks like this picture could be several years older than when it was printed for the catalog.

any idea who these people were?

> What are the earliest that people know riders were riding
> offroad on a unicycle? I don’t mean
> just riding down a dirt path, but actively pursuing it as a sport.

Of course, like bicycling, in the early days most roads were “off-road” by
today’s standards. But okay, that doesn’t count for this question.

Speaking for myself, I rode on dirt from the beginning. There must have been
many others before me, but I’ll give my example:

I lived on an unpaved street in Livonia, MI. As most of my learning to ride
was done at home, one of my earliest riding goals was to be able to ride
down my driveway and onto my street, at least far enough to get to the
nearby paved street. So I started riding on dirt by necessity in late 1979.

But within a few months of that, I started venturing onto local dirt bike
paths on purpose. My brother took 8mm movies of me zooming around a set of
trails near my house, which are now part of the Livonia Mall parking lot. In
1981 I wrote an article for the USA Newsletter and called it UMX, saying how
trails were fun to ride on and people should try it. The article appeared in
early 1982.

When we started to have dirt races at the unicycle conventions (many years
later, and also at my urging), we called those UMX as well. I called it that
because I wanted to attach to the popularity of BMX. But we recently stopped
official usage of “UMX” because we’ve never really done a moto-type event at
any convention I’ve been to. Now they are MUni (or Muni) events.

The first “off road” unicycle race I remember was at the International
Cycling Festival in Hull, Quebec in 1988. Almost all of it was on pavement
(we were in the middle of downtown), but it went around buildings, up & down
a few stairs, and around obstacles. It was lots of fun.

This was followed by what we would now call the first MUni race, at UNICON
IV in Puerto Rico. About 100 riders participated in a race of about 1 mile
on a dirt/sand/mud puddle road. It was a blast! I think Alfredo Martinez
came in first, and I was second, followed by Takayuki Koike.

The first dirt race at a USA convention was in 1989 in Mobile, Alabama. This
course was maybe a little over 1 mile, mostly on grass, with at least one
curb, a ditch, and up and down a long shallow hill. Bragging a bit here, I
think I won that one by almost a minute.

> My understanding is that the mid-eighties were about the earliest?

George Peck got his unicycle in 1985, and first contacted me in 1986 or so.
He was seriously riding on dirt, where I just did it as an aside to all
the other forms of unicycling I did.

But I lived in flat areas that didn’t have much in the way of interesting
trails. Long Island had one really fun trail, that I started riding
regularly in the early 90s, but that was about it. I still mostly did not go
out of my way to ride on trails.

This didn’t become a major activity for me until I found the
long/scenic/more challenging trails in Auburn, CA, a year and a half after
moving out here.

> specific sport. George Peck and I were
> fairly actively doing pure unicycle trials around 1986, which
> is the earliest I know of. Anybody have input on this?

My friends and I used to ride on things and do jumping over rocks, curbs,
and other objects, but I don’t think any of us ever compared it to the sport
known as Trials for bikes or motorcycles, partly because we probably had
never heard of it. I have no knowledge of people actively doing trials for
the sake of trials before you and George. Other riders surely have, but they
did not communicate about it and promote it to the world so others could
join in the fun.

Stay on top,
John Foss, the Uni-Cyclone
jfoss@unicycling.com
www.unicycling.com

“You’re not supposed to wash your Roach armor” - Nathan Hoover, on safety
equipment cleaning methods

Roger Davies wrote:
> I will hijack Duncan
> sometime and get a new one of him… maybe I should put the ironing one of
> him up :slight_smile:

Are you about to tell us Duncan’s into ironing as well?

See www.extremeironing.com/~eib/ei/homepage/main.php


Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny )
Jenny Colyer born 05/02/02 - www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/jenny/
“Sleep - what’s that?” “Pardon?”
B4/5v c(+) rv d m(+) w++ q+ k e+ t+ (s) g+ f

Roger Davies wrote:
> I will hijack Duncan
> sometime and get a new one of him… maybe I should put the ironing one of
> him up :slight_smile:

Are you about to tell us Duncan’s into ironing as well?

See www.extremeironing.com/~eib/ei/homepage/main.php


Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny )
Jenny Colyer born 05/02/02 - www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/jenny/
“Sleep - what’s that?” “Pardon?”
B4/5v c(+) rv d m(+) w++ q+ k e+ t+ (s) g+ f

Danny Colyer wrote:
> Are you about to tell us Duncan’s into ironing as well?
> See www.extremeironing.com/~eib/ei/homepage/main.php

See http://www.extremeironing.com/~eib/ei/gcomp/index.php
(Strange goings in the North of England)

> Jenny Colyer born 05/02/02 - www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/jenny/

Many congrats.

> “Sleep - what’s that?” “Pardon?”

Probably explains why you missed the Duncan discussion.

> B4/5v c(+) rv d m(+) w++ q+ k e+ t+ (s) g+ f

People here won’t understand. Not sure many uk_jugglers understand. :wink:

Regards,
Mark.

Fujitsu Telecom Europe Ltd,| o
Solihull Parkway, | In the land of the pedestrian, /|\
Birmingham Business Park, | the one-wheeled man is king. <<
Birmingham, ENGLAND. | O

Danny Colyer wrote:
> Are you about to tell us Duncan’s into ironing as well?
> See www.extremeironing.com/~eib/ei/homepage/main.php

See http://www.extremeironing.com/~eib/ei/gcomp/index.php
(Strange goings in the North of England)

> Jenny Colyer born 05/02/02 - www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/jenny/

Many congrats.

> “Sleep - what’s that?” “Pardon?”

Probably explains why you missed the Duncan discussion.

> B4/5v c(+) rv d m(+) w++ q+ k e+ t+ (s) g+ f

People here won’t understand. Not sure many uk_jugglers understand. :wink:

Regards,
Mark.

Fujitsu Telecom Europe Ltd,| o
Solihull Parkway, | In the land of the pedestrian, /|\
Birmingham Business Park, | the one-wheeled man is king. <<
Birmingham, ENGLAND. | O

On Tue, 12 Feb 2002 12:47:32 -0000, “Danny Colyer”
<danny@jugglersafety.net> wrote:

>Jenny Colyer born 05/02/02 - www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/jenny/
>“Sleep - what’s that?” “Pardon?”
>B4/5v c(+) rv d m(+) w++ q+ k e+ t+ (s) g+ f
Congratulations. The sleep issue is only natural, dark-eyed is what
young fathers should look like anyway. The puzzle (or whatever it
is) beats me.

Klaas Bil

“To trigger/fool/saturate/overload Echelon, the following has been picked automagically from a database:”
“Dictionary, DPSD, MOSAIC”