problems having

Scott Harvey wrote:
>
> I’ve been riding now for around a year (and on about level 3) And I have
> come across two areas I just can’t seem to pass:
>
> 1. Wheel Walking- although it may seem very distant for a level 3 rider I
> thought I would give it a go and after about an hour of practice I was
> able to travel about 3 metres until I feel. I start by holding onto the
> fence and one foot idling then put my other foot up and start going until
> I fall. I was wondering if people have come across a better way to learn?

You are doing it about right, persist. Remember to not lean forward. Always
feed your feet along the tyre going from your toe to your heal with your feet
generally pointing in. If you are having trouble with your feet getting
tangled on the wheel try it on your 26" uni and put the seat up as high as you
can get it. This gives you more room for your feet and allows you to grip the
seat easily.

> 2. Stairs- This is something that seems a bit more achievable, I am able to
> go down about 4-5 stairs with no trouble but any more and I loose
> control. I wanted to know if how other people go down them for example i
> go down on an angle and take one step at a time, I thought mabe people go
> straight down them but that seems a bit suicidal

Always hold your sea, but depends on how steep it is whether you hold your self
into the seat or not. I use my legs as suspention to take the shock out.

Roger

               -----------------------------------------
                       Roger.Davies@Octacon.co.uk
                                Stockton
                           North East England

I’ve been riding now for around a year (and on about level 3) And I have come
across two areas I just can’t seem to pass:

  1. Wheel Walking- although it may seem very distant for a level 3 rider I
    thought I would give it a go and after about an hour of practice I was able
    to travel about 3 metres until I feel. I start by holding onto the fence
    and one foot idling then put my other foot up and start going until I fall.
    I was wondering if people have come across a better way to learn?

  2. Stairs- This is something that seems a bit more achievable, I am able to go
    down about 4-5 stairs with no trouble but any more and I loose control. I
    wanted to know if how other people go down them for example i go down on an
    angle and take one step at a time, I thought mabe people go straight down
    them but that seems a bit suicidal :slight_smile:

Scott Harvey

Re: problems having

On Sat, 1 Nov 1997, Harvey wrote:

>
> I’ve been riding now for around a year (and on about level 3) And I have
> come across two areas I just can’t seem to pass:
>
> 1. Wheel Walking- although it may seem very distant for a level 3 rider I
> thought I would give it a go and after about an hour of practice I was
> able to travel about 3 metres until I feel. I start by holding onto the
> fence and one foot idling then put my other foot up and start going until
> I fall. I was wondering if people have come across a better way to learn?
>
I would immediately suggest that you should expect to do a lot more than 1 hour
of practise to get wheel walking. I subscribe to the theory that holding onto
things whilst learning is completely different to doing a skill without holding
on - and thus not entirely useful. Despite this, I learnt by “walking” up and
down my driveway next to a wall. This wall is only about 4 metres long, so I
pretty rapidly ran out of room. I think that starting holding onto support, and
going a couple of metres before making your bid for freedom is the best way to
go, simply because it means you don’t have to worry about the transition to WW.
Alternating between using support and no support will also build your
confidence because you’ll actually be able to go places when you have the
support. I found it was simply a matter of time. One day it just clicked for
me, and I went from going 1-3 metres to well over 5 metres. Practise practise
practise. Same old story.

> 2. Stairs- This is something that seems a bit more achievable, I am able to
> go down about 4-5 stairs with no trouble but any more and I loose
> control. I wanted to know if how other people go down them for example i
> go down on an angle and take one step at a time, I thought mabe people go
> straight down them but that seems a bit suicidal
>

Isn’t straight down steps the best way to go? I’ve never tried anything else!

uNICycle@tartarus.uwa.edu.au

Re: problems having

In article <1.5.4.32.19971101055437.00672dcc@rpi.net.au>, Harvey
<beacon@rpi.net.au> wrote:

> I’ve been riding now for around a year (and on about level 3) And I have
> come across two areas I just can’t seem to pass:
>
> 1. Wheel Walking- although it may seem very distant for a level 3 rider I
> thought I would give it a go and after about an hour of practice I was
> able to travel about 3 metres until I feel. I start by holding onto the
> fence and one foot idling then put my other foot up and start going until
> I fall. I was wondering if people have come across a better way to learn?

It sounds like you are making good progress. I know several people who would
just love to be able to make 3 metres. Keep up the practice, you are over the
first big hurdle now. I started learning in a hall way where you have support on
both sides and then went on to the way you descibed. This seems to work pretty
well, giving you a bit of support while you get your feet right.

I would suggest a couple of things, a helmet is a good idea while practicing
wheel walking. Falling forwards is fine but if you go backwards chances are you
will end up on your back. A hemlet lets you stop worrying about that happening
and allows a little more focus. Try going as slow as possible when wheel
walking. The tendency is to speed up and keep on speeding up until you come off.
Practice riding very slowly as well as trying to wheel walk slowly. Riding
slowly will come in handy when making transitions as well.

To make the transition from normal riding to wheel walking isn’t as hard as you
would think. The important thing is to get your speed right down. Then while one
foot is on the downward path bring your other foot up on to the wheel and follow
it with the other one. This means you always have a foot in contact with the
unicycle which makes things (reasonably) stable.

front () .-’ .-’
==
when foot gets to about here bring other foot up on to tire.

Your foward momentum should mean you are moving forward the entire time which
aids balance.

> 2. Stairs- This is something that seems a bit more achievable, I am able to
> go down about 4-5 stairs with no trouble but any more and I loose
> control. I wanted to know if how other people go down them for example i
> go down on an angle and take one step at a time, I thought mabe people go
> straight down them but that seems a bit suicidal
>
> Scott Harvey

The advice I’ve had is to take them all in one go, if you stop and pause you
tend to lose it.

Catch ya Peter

            o Peter Bier - computing student o O o pjb10@waikato.ac.nz o(|\o
            (delete nospam- to send a message)