pedal strippage

I own two identical 28" Sun unicycles, and the pedals seem to strip the threading on the cranks about every mile of unicycling or so. I figure this would be unacceptable for a bike, so it’s probably unacceptable for a uke, too.

I have replaced the crank and pedals on one of them, using a different brand of both, and this didn’t help at all.

I don’t do a lot of tricks, just an occasional bunny hop. Mostly I just use them for going places.

Is the Sun brand of unicycle just a shoddy one? Is there some brand of crank with tougher threads? Any advice?

although it seems silly, and i appoligise if youve already thought of this, but you might want to check that you have the left pedal on the left side and the right on the right side.

when i first got my very first unicycle i had managed to turn around the seat some time and so was effectively riding backwards everywhere - putting the wrong pressure on the threads. that on top of being a bit of a fatty meant I was ripping through cranks faster than the local bike shop could supply them… I only realised what the problem was after getting a fancy new unicycle!

The pedal on the right tightens when turned counter-clockwise, which I believe is correct, right?

Nope.

The way I remember is that the pedal on the right is tightened the “right” way (righty-tighty, lefty-loosey) and the pedal on the left is tightened the other way.

Either your cranks are reversed or your seat is on backwards (not both!).

The only way to put the wrong pedal on the wrong crank is through force (effectively stripping the crank).

Both cranks and pedals should be labled L and R. Sometimes only one side is marked, usually the right side. Pedals are often labeled on the end of the bit thats threaded. Cranks are usually labeled on the side that faces the unicycle.

I always put pedals on by hand and only use a wrench after its on a few threads. If you have to use a tool right away, you’re probably crossthreading (and ruining) your crank.

The right pedal has normal threads and tightens when turned clockwise.

The left pedal has reverse threads and tightens when turned counter-clockwise.

Looks like you’ve got your pedals (and cranks) backwards which would tend to cause the pedals to come undone as you ride. The easy fix for you would be to flip your seat around.

That is backwards to what you would think due to the direction that the pedals turn when you ride. But that is the correct way so the pedals stay tight as you ride. An explanation as to why is here and here.

Grease or oil the pedal threads before threading them into the crank. And make sure you don’t accidentally cross-thread the pedals when putting the pedals on. Cross-threading will strip the threads in the crank.

Putting the right pedal in the left crank or vice versa is next to impossible. Putting the right crank on the left of the uni and vice versa is way too easy. Or simply putting the seat on back to front…

The pedal on the right of the uni, as you sit on it facing forwards, should tighten clockwise.

The pedal on the left of the uni, as you sit on it facing forwards, should tighten anti-clockwise.

That’s clockwise/anti-clockwise if you’re tightening the pedal from the pedal side of the crank, rather than reaching through the crank with a hex wrench (Allen key) - some pedals have a hex socket in the end.

If the pedal is on the wrong side of the uni, then it will unwind as you ride. It’s such a simple mistake to make, especially as when you are working on the uni, it is often upside down. Be methodical.

Pedals are such a basic commodity that you can be certain it isn’t faulty pedals. You are unlikely to get two consecutive sets of faulty cranks. Therefore, it is almost certainly an assembly problem.

In addition to the cranks being on the wrong end of the hub, or the seat being the wrong way round, the wheel may be the wrong way around in the frame. It’s probably better, and easier, to remove the wheel from the frame and turn it round than remove the cranks and refit them if that is the problem, square tapers don’t like being removed often.

Either approach will work.

I have swapped the square taper cranks on all of my unis many many times, and have never noticed it being a problem. I’ve tried 89, 102, 110, 125 on my 20 and the same plus 150s on my old 24; 125, 110, 102, and 89 on the 28; 150 and 125 on the Coker, and 150, 170 on the MUni - trying some of the combinations more than once, or upgrading to lighter cranks, and occasionally moving the cranks round 90 degrees to even out tyre wear. I ride fairly hard but without much hopping or dropping. I think the fear of changing cranks too often on square tapers is a bit of an urban myth. There is no doubt an effect there, but as long as you are careful, and don’t do it every week I see no problem.

Re: pedal strippage

In message
<c56608c6a019f71f9eff5382466374b6.20fiin@NoEmail.Message.Poster.at.Unicyc
list.com>, mscalisi <mscalisi@NoEmail.Message.Poster.at.Unicyclist.com>
writes
>
>The only way to put the wrong pedal on the wrong crank is through force
>(effectively stripping the crank).
>
>Both cranks and pedals should be labled L and R. Sometimes only one
>side is marked, usually the right side. Pedals are often labeled on the
>end of the bit thats threaded. Cranks are usually labeled on the side
>that faces the unicycle.

In addition, LH pedals are usually knurled / ribbed where they screw
into the crank, RH pedals are plain.

Wassail!

Martin E Phillips nb Boden, Splatt Bridge
http://www.g4cio.demon.co.uk martin/at/g4cio/dot/demon/dot/co/dot/uk
Homebrewing, black pudding, boats, morris dancing, ham radio and more!
The Gloucester-Sharpness canal page http://www.glos-sharpness.org.uk

Another clue can be the “R” (right-hand) and “L” (left-hand) often stamped on the cranks and the pedal stub

jim

[QUOTE=Martin Phillips]

In addition, LH pedals are usually knurled / ribbed where they screw
into the crank, RH pedals are plain./QUOTE]

By Jove! You’re right. Never noticed that. I’ve just been to check and it is true for 3 of my 5 unis and the 2 where it is not true have the cheapest pedals.