Pedal Grabs?

When I pedal grab i tend to get the bottom of my fork up there to. Is this right or should I just be using my pedal? I tried doing a pedal only grab but i could bearly balance. Do you have any tips?

-Budd-

Try getting the crank on the edge, but not the bottom of the frame. With both the pedal and the crank on the edge it’s nice and stable; you can stand there all day. Jumping on the frame might risk squashing the bearings or loosening the bearing holders, or something equally weird. (Possibly… I’m not an expert!)

I can only just do a grab with only the pedal, but they are very wobbly…

Phil

Oh okay. I’ll have to try crank grabs. But I’ll wait until I find something wooden to jump onto. I don’t want to scratch my beautiful Profiles. Is the only advantage of a pedal grab over a crank grab the height you can jump to?

Thanks,
Andrew

Re: Pedal Grabs?

>Is the only advantage of a pedal grab over a crank grab the
>height you can jump to?
>

The height difference will be minimal, but, with pedal grabs you will be able
to grab uneven and small objects. Rails, posts, stumps, etc. An excellent skill
to learn if you are serious about trials.

Dylan

Thanks Dylan. They do sound useful.

try learning to grind, that’ll scuff up your cranks in no time.

i’ve pretty much perfected crank grabs, and i can grab onto stuff thats fairly high too, but the problem is that sometimes the stuff i’m grabbing onto isn’t big enough or flat enoughto land the pedal and the crank on. time to spend some serious time practicing pedal grabs.
and i’d like to be able to grind on just my pedal too.

I only crank grab on plastic/wood stuff, so my cranks get beaten only minimally. I land with my crank, pedal, and the bottom of my frame on the obstacle. I have main-cap bearing holders, (or something like that) and the only thing that happened to me was the little bolts got flattened (they were hemi-spherical once…). They seem to be holding my frame together just as well as before, but then again, they’ve been flat for a while…

My uni is still in one piece, so I personally don’t worry too much if I land on the bottom of the frame as well, but other frames might be different.

this happenes to me too. i grab with my crank a lot so the first thing i did was turn the bolts upside down so the nut is at the top and the flat head is facing downwards.
after a while the bolts broke.
so i got a set of bolts from a bike shop that fitted, and in the course of time they broke too.
now i’ve got a set of D.K. skateboard truck bolts and their holding up niceley, the best thing about them is they are designed to sit flush with the top of the board, so the countersunk bolts fit niceley into the bearing holders with nothing sticking out. they’ve lasted for months and show no signs of fatigue

Yeah, the bolts on mine are looking pretty sad but still holding that one-wheeled wonder together. I don’t think I’ll worry too much until something breaks and/or falls off.

Those D.K. skateboard truck bolts sound pretty cool. When mine break I might have to look into that. It’s always great to hear other people’s amazing ideas… I love forums!

From what i see you guys do more crank grabs than pedal grabs. Can anyone do an actually do a real pedal grab? And if you can who do you do it??

-Budd-

uni_x, I’m very sure that a good number of uni riders can really pedal grab. As said before, they’re much better for hopping up to difficult or smaller obstacles.

Check out Universe, or Universe 2 (when it comes out). Universe really helped me answer some “How-to” questions.

If you havn’t already, check out the lutkus Kris Holm workshops. They’re awsome.

It’s so much better to see someone doing it, especially when Kris explains them.

okay, okay.
I CAN actually do a pedal grab, and i’ve let this go long enough.
I’m not sure exactly what you mean by “how do you do it?” but i’ll try.
first you hop up (seat out front), and rotate your cranks in the air, so the pedal grabbing crank is the highest. then, you land the pedal on. immediatly do a 100% weight transfer onto the pedal that’s on the object. i usually stick my other leg out in the air for balance, if i need it.

Then, once you’re ready to go up (d’ont stay there too long!)bring the pedal up, then do a “S” shaped movement with the wheel. meaning, you go above the where your cranks are horizontal, (so the bottom of your tire is the closest you can get it to the object your pedal is on) and then pull up, and return to horizontal pedal position in the air, so that you’re in the right hopping position once you land.

now you should be up there.

it takes a while to be able to do this, but just keep practising.
i d’ont crank grabs anymore. pedal grabs are quicker, and you get more height with them.

-Ryan

vortex_oow: I’ll look for that universe video. Can you give me the URL of the Kris Holm workshop site?

m_extreme_uni: Thanx for the explaination. I only have one question, when you jump from the pedal grab to the tyre, is your crank vertical or horizontal?

-Budd-

It depends on the person, but it’s easiest to have it about half way, because you’ll have some upwards momentum (from pulling it up to that position) and less distance to go up. it doens’t have to be in any position though. it’s easier to do when it’s horizontal, than completely vertical, but go for a good mix.

-Ryan

I am not much of a pedal grab person. I have never tried it although I have seen someone doing a crank grab. It was cool to see how high he could climb. On the DVD version of Into the Thunder Dragon, in one of the extra scenes it has a detailed description of how to pedal grab, and Kris describes exactly what he is doing. He goes from a few medium height wooden pole things, pedal grabs onto a really high one and then drops off it. Most impressive. One of the points he made was that you grab it with the pedals lined up vertically, and when you are balanced on the pedal, you line up your cranks horizontally so that there is a smaller distance to hop from the pedal to the rubber (the “S” shaped hopping movement).

http://lutkus.com/video/Kris_Holm_workshop/

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